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New England; ideal ski widths of skis if you could own two, three or four pair of skis?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
New England; ideal ski widths of skis if you could own two, three or four pair of skis?

I'm just curious what ski widths are optimum / ideal for specific conditions...

Perhaps others are as well...and maybe there are different trains of thought.

Could be an interesting discussion.
post #2 of 25

Well width is only part of the story there, dood. 

 

I'd say something in the mid-90s to 100mm underfoot with a full wood core and a bunch of camber with hybrid wall to wall layup with a mid 20s sidecut and some tip rocker up front for everyday- something like a Worth Daily Bread or a 183 regular hybrid BRO.

 

Also a 105-110ish ski with about the same or slightly less camber as above, with a little less sidecut and more rocker up front, also full wood core and hybrid or double carbon layup on here.  Think Moment Bellafonte or Worth Magics.   

 

Then a 115ish ski for pow.  I don't need anything wider because I only weigh around 165-170ish.  Biggger skiers might want more though.  Big shovel up front, flat or minimal camber, pintailish ass end and a slarvey, swiveley sidecut.  Think the brand new Bily Goats, or a similar ski for this slot. 

 

But that's just my .02 and that will change with the wind.  It always does. 

post #3 of 25

New England...easy

 

65-80mm hard snow frontside specialist

 

85-95mm, fresh/soft snow "all mountain" type

 

105 -120mm for the odd boottop or better dump (makes for a fine spring corn ski as well)

 

 

Have fun!

post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 

Let's put this another way which people may find more interesting, and may have more of an interest in discussing here...

 

Hypothetically you own 3 skis...

 

1) What do you think is the ideal ski width (and specific ski) for groomers when there hasn't been a storm in a while?

 

2) What do you think is the ideal ski width (and specific ski) if it snowed 8 to 12 inches 36 hours ago?

 

3) What do you think is the ideal ski width (and specific ski) if it snowed 8 to 12 inches over night and you're at the lifts at 8AM?

 

I'm not going to mention ability level, where you're skiing, trees, moguls etc...I'll leave that up to you to tell me which ski you're picking in each scenario and why (what you're going to do with it).

 

Hopefully we can scare away the crickets that have taken over this thread!

post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

Let's put this another way which people may find more interesting, and may have more of an interest in discussing here...

 

Hypothetically you own 3 skis...

 

1) What do you think is the ideal ski width (and specific ski) for groomers when there hasn't been a storm in a while?

 

2) What do you think is the ideal ski width (and specific ski) if it snowed 8 to 12 inches 36 hours ago?

 

3) What do you think is the ideal ski width (and specific ski) if it snowed 8 to 12 inches over night and you're at the lifts at 8AM?

 

I'm not going to mention ability level, where you're skiing, trees, moguls etc...I'll leave that up to you to tell me which ski you're picking in each scenario and why (what you're going to do with it).

 

Hopefully we can scare away the crickets that have taken over this thread!

 

My list stays exactly the same as above. But width in mm must be combined with appropriate flex too.

 

Everything is covered on your list


Edited by Rossi Smash - 12/1/12 at 5:58am
post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

Let's put this another way which people may find more interesting, and may have more of an interest in discussing here...

 

Hypothetically you own 3 skis...

 

1) What do you think is the ideal ski width (and specific ski) for groomers when there hasn't been a storm in a while?

 

2) What do you think is the ideal ski width (and specific ski) if it snowed 8 to 12 inches 36 hours ago?

 

3) What do you think is the ideal ski width (and specific ski) if it snowed 8 to 12 inches over night and you're at the lifts at 8AM?

 

I'm not going to mention ability level, where you're skiing, trees, moguls etc...I'll leave that up to you to tell me which ski you're picking in each scenario and why (what you're going to do with it).

 

 

 

I pretty much agree with Rossi, maybe slightly narrower for category 2 and 3. I tend to think in terms of snow conditions and temperature, ie.  hard icy conditions, lots of fresh snow, packed or untracked, warm days, spring corn snow, heavy wet snow, etc....

 

I will try to follow your lead and give my opinions: (me 6'4", 250 lbs, expert)

 

1.  assuming its gotten pretty hard, I choose my 70 mm +/- 5mm slalom racing ski if weekend (crowded) or my GS racing ski if midweek (no crowds). I don't want to slide around on the scraped spots and want to make lots of turns and take more frequent breaks. I have skied my 100 mm skis in this stuff and the racing skis are a lot more fun. Substitute front side carver of your choice, I would stay 75 mm or under.

 

2.  assuming nice soft packed snow almost any ski works. The race skis still work for me and if its cold that would be my choice. For a two ski quiver, I would choose the race ski. For a larger quiver, its time for the 78-88 mm all mountain ski. That would be the ideal ski and would be good off groomers and on. I don't own this type of ski, but I could see a Kastle MX78,83,88 being a lot of fun. If its warm and the snow is heavy, a 90 mm ski would be fun as well.

 

3.  Here's where the width and ski type can be "unlimited". I would only rule out dedicated powder skis due to not enough snow, although expand the amount to 8 to 24" and bring out the powder skis. As narrow a ski as a Head Monster 78 mm will work up to the 120 mm fully rockered skis. Assuming its a powder day, ideal width would be 100-120 mm (for me 140 mm) and rocker. I own a Ski Logic Charriot, 100 mm, and it is used on this day. If you have a 3 or 4 ski quiver, and it snowed 8", I would not bring out the powder skis, but the 90-105 skis that have good edge grip, because you will be skiing on what's underneath the 8" by noon time.

 

I have a two width quiver, narrow and wide, 70 mm race skis, and 100 mm Chariot. If I had three widths, I would add a 85 mm front side side carver. Most people would add a 85 mm all mountain ski and be happier. I don't see the need in New England for 90 mm skis unless that's your widest ski, but I would go 100 mm and call it a soft snow/powder ski.

 

I think a lot of New England skiers have quivers that are all fairly narrow based, like a 65 mm, 78 mm, and 88 mm ski. There is a anti-wide ski sentiment around here. I was really worried when I bought my 100 mm ski that I wouldn't like it. I was surprised at how much I did like it, but the Chariot can carve on ice at 100 mm better than most front side carvers, and that is why I like it so much. On an 80 degree day last spring at Cannon, I was still skiing on sheets of melting ice and loving it on my 100 mm Chariots. I don't see a big need for wide rockered skis in New England unless you can ski midweek and when it snows, as opposed to weekend warriors like me.

post #7 of 25

I gave my somewhat lengthy opinion above, but I would like to come at this from another angle. I bought 3 pairs of skis last year, after not buying any for about 20 years. The question I asked was why do I need more than one pair of skis (my wife asked me the same question) in New England?  Here's what I debated with myself.  There are two conditions my old slalom race skis were difficult to ski in, freshly laid man made snow that was like talcom powder and heavy wet fresh snow. Both conditions really grabbed the ski and edges didn't do much for you. I think wider skis with some degree of float make a big difference. Depending on your size and weight, going to a 75-88 mm width ski cures those issues. So why not find a ski in that range that can still hold and edge (my criteria) or has the characteristics you like and use it as your 1 ski quiver?

 

I decided that a narrow race ski for hard conditions and a wider everything else ski was a good way to go. Kind of fell into those choices based on what used skis were available on the web and what the prices were on new skis.

 

Any else care to share their thoughts and experiences?

post #8 of 25

Hard snow - 68 mm in three radii (sl, gs, and speed)

 

Haven't seen enough soft snow in the last 20 years to really advise on width for softer or deeper snow,

But I'm pretty sure I would want a nice soft bendy ski for tight trees, likely with some rocker too,  along with a 20 ish m radius somewhat medium soft ski for more open terrain.  I would likely want a wide charger for deep snow (i.e, just slightly softer flex than a sg in a wider width)

post #9 of 25

That may well be the difference.

 

I ONLY ski mid week biggrin.gif

 

New England snow might be the most variable of all. That's why a ski to match the conditions only makes you smile more. Is it required? No

 

Is it FUN? YES!

post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by bttocs View Post

I gave my somewhat lengthy opinion above, but I would like to come at this from another angle. I bought 3 pairs of skis last year, after not buying any for about 20 years. The question I asked was why do I need more than one pair of skis (my wife asked me the same question) in New England?  Here's what I debated with myself.  There are two conditions my old slalom race skis were difficult to ski in, freshly laid man made snow that was like talcom powder and heavy wet fresh snow. Both conditions really grabbed the ski and edges didn't do much for you. I think wider skis with some degree of float make a big difference. Depending on your size and weight, going to a 75-88 mm width ski cures those issues. So why not find a ski in that range that can still hold and edge (my criteria) or has the characteristics you like and use it as your 1 ski quiver?

 

I decided that a narrow race ski for hard conditions and a wider everything else ski was a good way to go. Kind of fell into those choices based on what used skis were available on the web and what the prices were on new skis.

 

Any else care to share their thoughts and experiences?

I was once in a similar position.  My wife asked why I needed another pair of skis.  My skis were an old pair of SG skis.  At 160 lbs and 208 cm, float in deep (but not dry powder) snow was not a problem.  With a 65 - 70 m radius, there was no problem with grabby edges.  The only problem was it took half the hill to get them up to speed, and then after three turns you had to shut 'er down.  You could only really get two really good turns per run.  So, I got a 13 m radius sl ski.

 

The problem with the SL skis was I kept trying to do things with them that they weren't meant to do.  Yes, I did indeed use them at the speed and turn radius they were designed for, but I also couldn't resist letting them rip, and sometimes got myself in trouble by trying to turn too hard at gs-sg speeds.   They could easily make gradual turns at too high speeds, but they could also bight into a good stiff pile of snow and want to turn much much sharper, when you only wanted to turn sharper than the drift that was going on.

 

I definitely want a gs ski, a stiff gs ski, not one that is soft enough to make you think it could double as a sl ski, but one that won't fold up on you when yo really want to drive it into a super hard turn at speed,   bot not a ski with 65 m turn radius and not a ski a metal cap that won't let you put a 3 degree side bevel on it (lots of ice around here).

 

No money, so I can't buy any more skis now; I'll have to be good when out on the 13-m ski, or on smile.gifthe bendy gs ski.  

 

A wide soft bendy ski for slow turns in tight trees would be fun too.

post #11 of 25

What's a cricket and what did they do to your train of thought?

 

I thought Rossi, owner of quite a quiver, was right on. He demo's from his own ski wall. biggrin.gif

 

edit to comment: I think DW's suggestions are a little wide for the average good skier in Eastern conditions.


Edited by davluri - 12/1/12 at 8:02am
post #12 of 25

A problem is rocky conditions in firm snow, like low coverage with no new snow, like whenever the weather is not providing a decent base. What can you do? You want your narrow skis to be very sharp to perform on their intended surface, firm. But if you take them out when it's firm-low coverage, you will damage the edges, probably beyond restoration to really sharp. My solution is to just give up on rocky conditions and bring out any stiff old beat up skis, saving the good 75mm carvers for a firm day with excellent coverage.

post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 

Yeah, that's why I'm afraid to go out yet in New England - I have no expendable skis.

 

But maybe since they only have like 5 or 10 trails open they have concentrated on making a good base on the few trails they have opened?

post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bttocs View Post

I think a lot of New England skiers have quivers that are all fairly narrow based, like a 65 mm, 78 mm, and 88 mm ski.

 

Right now I have 2 skis around 75mm and my new ones, Salomon Rocker 2 90's, at 89mm, which are kind of soft...I want to use them on recent big dump days. I'm looking at getting a stiffer groomer ski in the 80mm range or a stiffer 88mm all mountain ski that leans more towards a groomer ski.

 

But what the heck do I know - that's why I'm here picking you people's brains!

post #15 of 25

I bought my GS race stock skis this year from a race coach in VT. He sells skis for race teams and parents that are used for really good prices and has quite the inventory. Ghost, you especially may find what you want at an affordable price. I bought Blizzard Magnesium racestock GS skis 192 cm. I like em, but I am a big guy. The VT guy has a new pair for $100 and will put a binding on it for around $75. Very reasonable, and racestock skis don't change drastically year to year. I have never felt a better grip on ice from any other ski I have owned or skied. He will ship skis as well as pick up.

 

http://vermontyardsale.com/

post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
Yeah so I own 75mm Salomon XW Storm skis and I bought 89mm Salomon Rocker 2 90 skis for softer deeper frontside conditions primarily. I am itching to buy one more - either stiffer more groomer oriented 88mm skis (Experience 88 or Blizzard Bushwacker) or more advanced groomer skis in the 80mm range (Rossignol Pursuit HP or Blizzard Magnum 8.0 Ti skis) Hmm...There may be no rhyme nor reason nor logic to it but I am trying to get the ones I can most justify...if that makes any sense!
Edited by twochordcool - 12/5/12 at 12:19pm
post #17 of 25

2 skis: 72-78 mm all mountain carver and 98-105 soft snow

3 skis: 68-72 mm race carver, 85-95 mm twin tip or twin rocker, 115-115 serious soft snow.

4 skis +: Beyond three, useless $ unless you have a particular fetish like racing or trees or freestyle. 

post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

Yeah so I own 75mm Salomon XW Storm skis and I bought 89mm Salomon Rocker 2 90 skis for softer deeper frontside conditions primarily. I am itching to buy one more - either stiffer more groomer oriented 88mm skis (Experience 88 or Blizzard Bushwacker) or more advanced groomer skis in the 80mm range (Rossignol Pursuit HP or Blizzard Magnum 8.0 Ti skis) Hmm...There may be no rhyme nor reason nor logic to it but I am trying to get the ones I can most justify...if that makes any sense!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

2 skis: 72-78 mm all mountain carver and 98-105 soft snow

3 skis: 68-72 mm race carver, 85-95 mm twin tip or twin rocker, 115-115 serious soft snow.

4 skis +: Beyond three, useless $ unless you have a particular fetish like racing or trees or freestyle. 

 

 

Considering what you said above, beyond, and keeping in mind that I just want some new toys to play with, which of the 4 skis that I mentioned above makes the most sense to get, as a New England? (Bare in mind I said makes the most sense - not "makes sense"...I'm probably not being talked out of buying more skis!)

 

Is the Prophet 98 too similar to the Rocker 2 90 or would it be better in softer and deeper snow? Or should I go even a little bigger - Sir Francis Bacon?

 

Or as an east coast guy is 88 underfoot plenty...and I should just get a hard snow leaning 88mm ski since I already have a soft snow leaning 88mm ski?

 

Or should I just get a fantastic 80mm groomer ski...an upgrade from what I have?  

post #19 of 25

66 mm for hard pack and ice: about 50% of days (Volkl Speedwall SL)

72 mm for softer snow, warmer weather, recent storm, soft moguls: about 30% of days (Blizzard Supersonics)

94 mm for pow, 3D snow: hopefully 20% of days (Kastle FX 94)  This will be the 1-ski quiver for the West

post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

2 skis: 72-78 mm all mountain carver and 98-105 soft snow

3 skis: 68-72 mm race carver, 85-95 mm twin tip or twin rocker, 115-115 serious soft snow.

4 skis +: Beyond three, useless $ unless you have a particular fetish like racing or trees or freestyle

 

So, I guess 20+ doesn't work for you either? You do it your way, I'll do it mine!

 

1000

post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

 

So, I guess 20+ doesn't work for you either? You do it your way, I'll do it mine!

 

1000


I see a void. There is no 5 point design.  S7, definitely, and desperately. 

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

 

 

 

 

Considering what you said above, beyond, and keeping in mind that I just want some new toys to play with, which of the 4 skis that I mentioned above makes the most sense to get, as a New England? (Bare in mind I said makes the most sense - not "makes sense"...I'm probably not being talked out of buying more skis!)

 

Is the Prophet 98 too similar to the Rocker 2 90 or would it be better in softer and deeper snow? Or should I go even a little bigger - Sir Francis Bacon?

 

Or as an east coast guy is 88 underfoot plenty...and I should just get a hard snow leaning 88mm ski since I already have a soft snow leaning 88mm ski?

 

Or should I just get a fantastic 80mm groomer ski...an upgrade from what I have?  

Or maybe you should take a breath and realize how manic you're sounding. Your choices are all over the map. As far as factual assumptions, a fail: There are no deeper softer groomer days. Eastern groomers seldom get more than a few inches of new snow, and it's skied off in an hour. Your Sollie will be money in the trees where the soft lives, and will like bumps. Second, there are no "fantastic" 80 mm groomer skis that will markedly outperform the 75 mm you already have. If you want a serious carver for hardpack that really gives you new capabilities, you should be looking at a 68-72 mm race carver. Plenty of good ones out there. Third, the MX88 is a great ski, but wasted on most eastern slopes unless you're a heavy big guy (doubt it with the choices you've already made); not enough room to run. And compared to what you already own - which I assume indicates like - it's significantly stiffer and more demanding. The Bushwacker is another great ski, fine for the east, forgiving, but you have that niche covered by the Sollie. Yes, the Prophet 98 is (another) nice ski, but what will it give you that you do not already have? Why not think about a real soft snow ski? Seriously, if you just want permission to go buy a ski, you have my permission. Go for the coolest graphics. If you want to build a reasonable 3-ski quiver, think about what qualities you like in the skis you own, what niches they do not fill for you personally, and then seek skis that have the feel and cover the place you feel uncovered. 

post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I see a void. There is no 5 point design.  S7, definitely, and desperately. 

 

Have never been interested in the S7 or Super 7....or similar DPS for that matter.

post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

 

Have never been interested in the S7 or Super 7....or similar DPS for that matter.


But......but, but......but......      smile.gif

post #25 of 25

Rock skis

Soon to be rock skis

Skis yet to be mounted wink.gif

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