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Extreme terrain at resorts and how it compares to the OB Gnar? - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

 

 

Bob:  What's going on with ARL, is it Bruce's now?

 

Bruce and Theo had an unfortunate falling-out about three years ago.  As far as I know and at this particular moment in time, Bruce is affiliated with Tommy Moe's operation at Tordrillo Mountain Lodge.  Bruce raves about the place.

 

Theo's daughter Alex has been running the business side of ARL for the last few years.  I got the impression at Theo's memorial that she will continue in that role and that the guide crew will be back and Alaska Rendezvous Lodge will be operating as usual for the coming season.

 

Very sad about Theo.  He was a good friend from a long time back.

post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

 

Those inbounds runs would get scraped and bumped even if it was being skied by only the world's best skiers.  It's an inevitable result of traffic on a slope.  The same would happen to those AK runs if a bunch of people went over the same areas.  Not sure what your point is.


Proving your ignorance I'm afraid; give a person enough rope....

There is no comparison between a hill bumped out by expert skiers and one bumped out by a less skillful set. example: I once skied a glacier in Italy being used in the summer only by the national teams of Europe. The bumps were super nice, no blocked fall lines, no traverse ruts, no chopped off moguls etc.

The point is that crappy skiers make a crappy bump run.

post #33 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
The point is that crappy skiers make a crappy bump run.

Absolutely! I have skied a small hill in Moscow, and at the end of the day most runs become a nightmare: huge assymetric bumps to the sides and terrible bulletproof stripe in the middle.

post #34 of 46

Thanks for the update. I'm sorry to hear about the fallout.  Looks like he ended up OK with Tordrillo.  I've also heard nothing but good about Kings & Corn, with that all star crew!

 

Theo's passing was a tragedy.  It just won't be the same going back, but hopefully I do.

I hope he's resting up on Bill Mitchell.

 

RIP Teddy.

post #35 of 46
Thread Starter 

What happened to Theo?

post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post


Proving your ignorance I'm afraid; give a person enough rope....

There is no comparison between a hill bumped out by expert skiers and one bumped out by a less skillful set. example: I once skied a glacier in Italy being used in the summer only by the national teams of Europe. The bumps were super nice, no blocked fall lines, no traverse ruts, no chopped off moguls etc.

The point is that crappy skiers make a crappy bump run.

 

Well, that was a little more concise than the response I had but, yeah, that's pretty much it.

post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post


Proving your ignorance I'm afraid; give a person enough rope....

There is no comparison between a hill bumped out by expert skiers and one bumped out by a less skillful set. example: I once skied a glacier in Italy being used in the summer only by the national teams of Europe. The bumps were super nice, no blocked fall lines, no traverse ruts, no chopped off moguls etc.

The point is that crappy skiers make a crappy bump run.

 

Okay, I guess I stand corrected.  That's surprising it's such a difference.  On the other hand, a good skier should be able to handle both just fine.  Oh no, the bumps aren't perfect!

post #38 of 46

JayT - Don't know how old you are so this may have been before your time but, in the mid-seventies, we used to ski bumps on 205 or longer skis.  Then there was a move toward short skis, 175 or so for comparable skiers.  Those of us who resisted the length change suddenly found the bumps to be much tighter with steeper backs, almost like a stairstep effect with large stairs.  They were much more difficult to ski with the long skis so, begrudgingly, a lot of us caved and bought into the short ski deal.  It certainly made skiing the bumps easier but it wasn't as good as the older times of bumps formed by longer skis.  Fortunately, the short ski thing was just a fad and the bumps got better again, until snowboards came along.  Then the bumps really started getting funky and choppy and, again, much harder to ski.  It's about the rhythm of the turns relative to the spacing and shape of the moguls.  With choppy traverse cuts and uneven turning of skiers who shape the bumps to start with, it makes a huge difference to the fun of skiing them.  Can a good skier ski them?  Yes.  Is it all that much fun?  No.  I don't prefer dropping off the backside of a chopped bump, onto a flat top of the next bump.  It all changes and the kind of skier and their equipment that form the moguls has a large impact on the ski-ability.  If a good zipperline is formed; lots of fun.  If irregular and dictating non-rhythmic turns; not so much.   

post #39 of 46

True 'nuff, skiers can handle most stuff, but nicely formed bumps can be one of the great pleasures skiing. not so choppy, small, irregular bumps.

 

We slide our line often to fix the bumps. then it's good for awhile, until some people find it, then it gets trashed again.

 

not piling on JT, GM and I were typing at the same time.

 

With the leadership of Steve McKinney and his buds, Squaw fought the short ski thing with everything they had: ridicule, shunning, reputation (-), mockery, disdain and disapproval, insults, the whole package.

post #40 of 46

Fair enough.  I'm not a big bump guy so I guess I can't relate, although I'm starting to enjoy them more than in the past... maybe because there weren't any in Tahoe last year until February!  ;-)

post #41 of 46
Inbounds gnar? you be the judge. No choppy bumps, just exposure.
 
 
Or
 
post #42 of 46

Resort Extreme has the advantages of snow control, available rescue, and practice on the lines, so skiers can be more agressive than the BC, where they have to avoid dangerous situations.

not to mention the hero factor  devil.gif

post #43 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by apeyros View Post

What happened to Theo?

 

I started a thread when it happened.  About 30 people viewed it.  I can't express how disappointed I was about the deafening silence from the self proclaimed core skiers in "Epic-Land".  Sadly most of you will never understand Theos contributions to skiing and snow science and have no clue about what we all lost with his passing.

post #44 of 46

La Grave or Chamonix gives you the super gnar with the ease of resort access..

post #45 of 46

I find the terrain both in and out of bounds around a lot of areas is often very similar. Main difference usually is first tracks (and any avy control). Calling anything "extreme" just depends on personal point of view.  

post #46 of 46

The title of this thread, "Extreme terrain at resorts and how it compares to the OB Gnar?," and most of the comments so far, seem to focus only on objective difficulty, which is the major factor in resort skiing. However, those of us who hike or climb to terrain that is more "B/C" than "OB" (where there is as much "Gnar" steeper than 60 degrees as you could ever want) face two additional factors: subjective difficulty and real danger. When you truly on your own out there, no helicopter hovering above to whisk you away, disasters have very serious consequences. More than once, I've looked down some You Fall-You Die chute and thought to myself, "What am I doing here? There's nobody up there giving out medals," and climbed back out. Were those lines really more objectively difficult than the most extreme in-bounds terrain?  I don't know.  However, for me, on that day, given the conditions, they were certainly more dangerous, and unjustifiable.

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