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Buying vs Renting

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I am a very Large guy 6'7" 260lb but an athletic build. Last year at Breckenridge I caught on very quick and was skiing some small Blacks by the end of day 1 with no ski school.  I would love to own at least my own boots and that is a challenge at a size 15 shoe 32.5-33 ski boot. Im not sure of the quality of the rentals I received last year or the stiffness however I have been told I need a minimum 90 flex boot.  Is it worth it to own your own boots if you only take 1-2 trips a year? Any boot suggestions for my skill level (Blue/Black I feel very comfortable with controlling my turns, speed, etc) or any boots to stay away from? Ill be in Big Sky this year and last year at break with my size I had 1 option on the boot i would rather just get something that will last and be fit to my foot. Also what would be a good rental ski? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks

post #2 of 10

The standard advice is to buy your own boots.  Boots are the "adaptor" that connects your uniquely shaped foot to the standard-shaped ski/binding.  Without well-fitting boots, your skiing will suffer dramatically.  (I can barely ski at all in rental boots, and from what I've observed on the hill neither can anybody else.)  So definitely buy boots.  The right boot to buy is the one that fits your feet - work with an experienced bootfitter to ensure you get a good fit.  It's worth every penny.

 

As for skis, renting good skis costs about $50 a day.  By buying gently used or last season's overstocks, skiing on them for a season or three, and then strategically reselling while they're still worth something, you can get that down to about $50/year. For instance, I just sold my Tigersharks for $375 after getting three seasons out of them. Since I only paid $400 for them, that's under $10/year.  Of course, you have to figure in maintenance, transportation, etc, but it's definitely cheaper to own than rent if you do it right.

 

Thirdly, you should take some lessons.  Now, before you spend years practicing and ingraining bad habits.

post #3 of 10

By all means, buy your own boots, per Walt's advice above.

 

I'd rent skis this year, then buy during the spring sales, once you figure what style of ski seems to put the biggest smile on your face (traditional camber, slight early rise, full rocker, etc.).

post #4 of 10

Welcome to EpicSki!  When are you going to Big Sky?  I went for the first time last winter and had a great time.  There are lots of long runs for intermediates.  I'm an advanced skier so also enjoyed the glades and going up the tram to Liberty.

 

Since you are thinking seriously about having more fun on the slopes, I suggest you check out the articles here:

 

http://www.epicski.com/atype/9/First_Run

 

Where do you live?  Even for only 1-2 trips a year, well worth investing in boots.  Especially given the size you need.  I have an old friend who's not quite as big as you but needs ski boots pretty close to your size.  He's having a much more fun after getting good boots from a local boot fitter.  Meaning in a ski shop, not just some salesperson in in a store that sells ski boots.  It could be there is a boot fitter who is local to you.  They are all over the country, not just near big ski resorts.

 

As for skis, makes more sense to rent this season.  Sounds like you will be progressing pretty fast, especially if you invest in a few lessons.  Try out several options.  Then you'll know what to look for during late season sales next spring.  Can do a personal Demo Day.  Usually for $50 can get demo skis on mountain and switch out as often as you like.  The idea is to take 2-3 runs on different skis.  Best to take the same runs.  Even novice skiers can tell the difference between brands/models/lengths.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tmeigs37 View Post

I am a very Large guy 6'7" 260lb but an athletic build. Last year at Breckenridge I caught on very quick and was skiing some small Blacks by the end of day 1 with no ski school.  I would love to own at least my own boots and that is a challenge at a size 15 shoe 32.5-33 ski boot. Im not sure of the quality of the rentals I received last year or the stiffness however I have been told I need a minimum 90 flex boot.  Is it worth it to own your own boots if you only take 1-2 trips a year? Any boot suggestions for my skill level (Blue/Black I feel very comfortable with controlling my turns, speed, etc) or any boots to stay away from? Ill be in Big Sky this year and last year at break with my size I had 1 option on the boot i would rather just get something that will last and be fit to my foot. Also what would be a good rental ski? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the quick replies!

 

One last question I have found two option from Salomon Its the Salomon RS brand one is a 100 and the other a 120.. Any advice on the stiffness difference in the 2 models? I have been told that with my size a 100 stiffness will not respond like a 100. True or False?

 

Also I have for a Head Edge+11 Which is a 90 flex however I feel that 90 isn't going to be stiff enough..

 

All tips are appreciated in advance I was a college/minor league baseball player from GA so i didnt grow up skiing and most of these ski terms are new to me.  I am hooked since last year in Breck which was my first year getting off the east coast WV etc.. 

 

MARZNC im heading out there MLK weekend I hope its not to early for good powder as they call it!

 

Thanks!!

post #6 of 10

Honestly, I only buy boots from a ski shop with an experienced boot fitter.  Too many variables go into a well fit ski boot.  Plus it's nice to have the option of going back for free tweaks if there is a spot or two that needs adjustment.

 

Flex ratings are not really that critical, plus they are no consistent across brands.  For instance, I'm an advanced skier but use a softer flex boot because I'm a lightweight.  An intermediate guy your size probably needs a stiffer boot.  But matching the shape of your feet to the internal shape of the boot is more important.

 

Check out this thread related to large boots:

http://www.epicski.com/t/115284/large-size-ski-boots#post_1510079

 

This one may also give you some ideas about how to go about getting gear if you don't want to wait until you are at Big Sky.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/114626/intermediate-skier-needs-help-with-gear-selection#post_1503161

 

Where did you ski in WV?  I've been to Winterplace and Snowshoe, but usually ski in VA or NC.

post #7 of 10

Listen to Marznc.  The fit is much more important than the flex index.  That said, if you have a choice go for the higher flex index - boots can easily be softened up (lower flex) but it's not so easy to increase the flex index.  As a big guy, you'll probably be able to handle a stiffer boot.  OTOH stiffer boots are usually more narrow, so if you have wide feet you may not be able to find 120 flex boots that fit your feet.  Again, choose the fit over the flex. 

post #8 of 10

The OPs biggest problem may be his big feet as i don't think a lot of shops stock boots to fit size 15 or if they do it will be only one model.

 

The solution may be to figure out a boot that fits his needs from a quality ski shop (boot fitter) and order a large enough boot next spring for the 2014 season.

post #9 of 10
He should be able to find a shell from a ski shop, which can always call around to find one. If not, Strolz can make a boot up to size 18, and Daleboot can make a custom boot to fit any feet. He is new at skiing and doesn't know how miserable he can be with a poorly fitting boot. That is why renting is a bad option. Depending upon renting can ruin his vacation. Rental boots are not designed for him, a self described " very large guy."
post #10 of 10

Yes, it's worth having you own kit.

 

Get boots first, find a boot fitter who can set you up with a pair of boots that fit, and then make them fit better.  It may take years to save on rentals, but that's not the point.  You will have good boots.  Well fitted boots are the most important piece of equipment in skiing.

 

Get skis, it's worth it so you don't have to waste your time in the rental shop line up.  

 

I would recommend 100 or higher flex, considering your weight.  Boots are like part of the suspension on a truck.  You don't see Mini springs on a five ton truck.

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