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Tecnica Cochise 130 Pro Review(s)

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

I'm starting this thread more so as an open discussion / ongoing review for these boots, since some of the potential issues can't really be discussed or known without at least a half season's worth of use.  There are multiple points of concern with a boot that has a walk mode, obviously.  Not to mention uphill vs. downhill.

 

So far, after 2 days of strictly downhill use, one thing I can absolutely say is the 130 flex rating is no joke.  These are every bit as stiff and responsive as Lange RX 130's and the power strap with the release mechanism is awesome.  Railing groomers felt pretty much the same and when I really needed my edges on some early morning off piste boiler plate (someone has to soften it up for everyone else) they were right there for me at every turn.

 

To be continued... but so far I'm very impressed.

post #2 of 27
I've got 3 days on mine.. (2 down, 1 up) Your points on the flex are right on. Still dialing in the fit on my right boot.

Love the walk mode but noticed after my touring day that there was a bunch of plastic on plastic rubbing on the contact point above instep.

Liners are a pita to return to the shell after adjustments. wink.gif
post #3 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

I'm starting this thread more so as an open discussion / ongoing review for these boots, since some of the potential issues can't really be discussed or known without at least a half season's worth of use.  There are multiple points of concern with a boot that has a walk mode, obviously.  Not to mention uphill vs. downhill.

 

So far, after 2 days of strictly downhill use, one thing I can absolutely say is the 130 flex rating is no joke.  These are every bit as stiff and responsive as Lange RX 130's and the power strap with the release mechanism is awesome.  Railing groomers felt pretty much the same and when I really needed my edges on some early morning off piste boiler plate (someone has to soften it up for everyone else) they were right there for me at every turn.

 

To be continued... but so far I'm very impressed.

Which skis are you skiing, the Kendo's or Cochises? 

post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Originally Posted by spknmike View Post

Liners are a pita to return to the shell after adjustments. wink.gif

 

I noticed this too, because it sort of catches the lip of the lower shell piece along the spine.  It is getting easier each time I take them out and put them back in.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

Which skis are you skiing, the Kendo's or Cochises? 

 

One day on each.

post #5 of 27

I've got 6 half days and one full day with some boot top powder. I've gone from a ultra thin sock liner to a regular sock liner and now a thin ski sock. Great fit, walk mode is so easy to engage/disengage that first time i didn't realize I had engaged/disengaged.

 

Why is the tab on the non bale part of the second buckle (from the toe) coloured red? And why is the non red part hinged?

 

Is there any flex (stiffness) adjustment?

post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

 

Why is the tab on the non bale part of the second buckle (from the toe) coloured red? And why is the non red part hinged?

 

I think I read somewhere it's to make getting in and out of the boot easier.

post #7 of 27

I have 10+ days on this boot and here's my feedback. I replaced the stock liner with a dfp hd full custom and had boot work done to work out most of the kinks, stil have something really hitting me on my upper right shin. I bought these boots along with a pair of line bacons and salomon guardians. These are my thinnest skis and the idea of this setup was to use them in bounds on non powder days and out backcountry. So far my experience with these is terrible.

 

Cons:

-I skied in them out in the backcountry (chopped up, some pow, some cement) single digits F and the ski/walk mechanism malfunctioned. I couldn't get the boot to snap back into ski mode and my calfs/feet took a massive beating. No skiing the next day.   

-the powerstrap buckle is a PIA. It's difficult to dial it in. Once you have used it for a bit it likes to go back to the same position. In my case it's too lose or too tight. You have to keep messing with it to get it right. Sure when you start off in the AM no big deal. However if you want to tweak it some as the day progresses it's annoying. A booster strap is way easier to deal with, even a traditional powerstrap.   

-These boots leak from the front. Others mention it only happens when the bottom buckles are loose, since I have a pretty snug fit I can't crank them down. After a day skiing in them and taking the liner out there was a pool of water in the shell. Duct tape helps across the front dam.

 

Pros:

-the buckle powerstrap really feels like a 4th buckle to me.

-edge to edge they feel great.

-light.

-up a bootpack they are comfortable

-are comfortable skinning

 

Needless to say I am returning these tomorrow as a boot that beats me up this bad is useless. I went through growing pains with this boot and unfortunately for me, not worth it. Having skied both the DFP liner and the stock liner, the DFP liner is considerably warmer.  

post #8 of 27
Been on my 120s for about 20 days (used at least 20 days already when I bought them). I also get leaking issues which, along with cold stock liners, has led to really cold feet more than a few times. Trying to resolve that one still. Haven't had the other problems, though, even on a couple -15 to -20 degree days. Agree with the pros. I find the powerstrap buckle to be my favorite part of the boot. A powerstrap that actually works like a buckle. Better than a fourth buckle AND a powerstrap together, in my opinion.
post #9 of 27

I just wonder how this boots compare to other on market? I know boot is really personal choice how it fits and how you leg is shaped...

 

I was looking into this models. Maybe some already test them or compare it with Tecnica C 120 boot.

 

Atomic Tracker 110 / 130

Tried just 110 version. I could say great Livefit on outside of the boot, not so flex for walking, I guess better for going down.

Walking system is not so advanced as on BD or Tecnica.

 

BD Factor 130

I found it great to use and fit into it, also great walking mode, do not know how is for going down

 

Salomon Quest 120

Similar to Atomic and I prefer 4 bucke system on Atomic.

 

Tecnica C 120

Need to see it and try it.

 

Thanks for your inputs.

post #10 of 27

I've got 30+ days (not all full days) on my pro 130s. I found them to be cold on cold days but was thinking it may be due to the inexpensive heat mold-able foot beds that I am using, or maybe they are just cold boots. I found some moisture getting in the boot between liner and shell, but I do not like to remove the liner if I don't have to so I just use boot dryers. I might try the duct tape.

 

I got my left boot punched at the baby toe. The boot fitter removed the velcro-in-place forward lean spacer that goes between the shell and liner. He said they should only be used by skiers with skinny legs (I definitely do not have skinny legs) and they are too narrow anyways and just dig into the back of you leg. He also mentioned that instructors today are teaching a more upright stance with less forward lean.

 

I switched from a Patagonia ultra light weight sock to a thicker light weight sock and now have a great fit.

 

I am very happy with these boots except for cold toes on cold days.

post #11 of 27
I have 3 days in these boots... I have a lot of wear on the bottom of the sole of the liner from putting them back in the shell. It is actually cutting the heal area and is almost 1/2 way through. Any body else seem this problem
post #12 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goofy K A View Post

I have 3 days in these boots... I have a lot of wear on the bottom of the sole of the liner from putting them back in the shell. It is actually cutting the heal area and is almost 1/2 way through. Any body else seem this problem

 

Yes, sort of.  The red spongy part on the heel of my liners is tearing apart from the contact.

post #13 of 27
Red sponge on mine started coming off the first day during adjustments. Seems to catch on the ridges of plastic on back of shell.

Got this years tech soles. Switching is pretty painless. They are made of a much beefier plastic and add ~ 100g per boot.

Planning to get that weight back and then some by trying a lighter liner as the stock is quite heavy (and small in the toebox for me).
post #14 of 27
The boot glove seems to be doing the trick for me for cold feet. Keeps the wet out and adds a nice buffer when you're skiing anything boot deep or more.
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goofy K A View Post

I have 3 days in these boots... I have a lot of wear on the bottom of the sole of the liner from putting them back in the shell. It is actually cutting the heal area and is almost 1/2 way through. Any body else seem this problem

what exactly do you mean? picture?

 

thx

post #16 of 27

Liner damage is one reason that I rarely remove boot liners. Another reason is that they sometimes don't initially re-seat exactly the way they were before they where removed. It seems to take some time for the fit to feel exactly the same as before they where removed.

 

My ski locker at my home Mt. has tubes with pumped in room temperature air that does a good job of drying boots overnight. I use electric low voltage heat tube boot dryers when on ski trips.

 

When I need to remove the liners i first make sure the boots are warmed to above room temp so the shell is soft.


Edited by DanoT - 2/2/13 at 9:16am
post #17 of 27
Good tips.

Fwiw, the red sponge damage seems superficial.
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

Liner damage is one reason that I rarely remove boot liners. Another reason is that they sometimes don't initially re-seat exactly the way they were before they where removed. It seems to take some time for the fit to feel exactly the same as before they where removed.

 

My ski locker at my home Mt. has tubes with pumped in room temperature air that does a good job of drying boots overnight. I use electric low voltage heat tube boot dryers when on ski trips.

 

When I need to remove the liners i first make sure the boots are warmed to above room temp so the shell is soft.

I'm in the Cochise 120 from last season & also noticed a bit of Red rubber showing some slight wear on the liner sole. I take my liners out at least twice a week & have found a new tool to reinstall them called Boot Horn. website is www.skiboothorn.com

post #19 of 27

I have skied about a week with these boots and have worked all of the kinks except freezing feet. What is a "boot glove"?  Any other recommendations?  Should I upgrade the liner?

post #20 of 27

A boot glove is a neoprene mitt that fits over the toe and instep of the ski boot without interfering with binding function. I find that on a really cold day they allow me to stay out for 1 or 2 runs longer than without them. By then other body parts are usually in need of warming up anyway so inside I go.

 

Since I also find the 130 Pro boots to be cold, I have just started using chemical toe warmers stuck to the top of my socks as this is one of the only boots in a while for me that had enough toe box room to allow it. A box of 30 pr go for under $10 at Costco in Canada.

post #21 of 27

I have been skiing some BD Factor 130s as my alpine boot since the near the end of last season.  I plan on doing a complete review, but one thing I know is that boots of this type with interchangeable sole blocks all have a problem being cold because they have metal bolts connecting them to the bottom of the shell.  Also, the shells and liners tend to be thinner in an attempt to save weight for AT use.  Boot Gloves will help, but part of the problem is coming up from the bottom where they do no good.

post #22 of 27

Do you think that replacing the stock liner with intuition liners would be a major improvement?

post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Elias View Post

Do you think that replacing the stock liner with intuition liners would be a major improvement?

 

I am certainly no expert on the subject, but I tried on the Salomon Quest boots and the liners and shells were very thin, and those boots have

a reputation of being cold.  My Factors have a pretty substantial BOA liner and I have not really had major cold feet issues. I tried on some Cochises but the fit was not good for me, and I was not particularly impressed with the liners.  Intuitions are generally warmer than the stock liners in any AT boot, but how much is an individual issue.  The metal bolts in the bottom of replaceable block boots tend to wick the cold up into the soles, so thicker/insulated insoles would probably improve that problem.  Intuition liners are almost always a warmth improvement in any boot, but I have a problem spending $150 to replace the liners in a pair of new $500 boots.  That just seems wrong, even if your feet are more comfortable.

post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

I have been skiing some BD Factor 130s as my alpine boot since the near the end of last season.  I plan on doing a complete review, but one thing I know is that boots of this type with interchangeable sole blocks all have a problem being cold because they have metal bolts connecting them to the bottom of the shell.  Also, the shells and liners tend to be thinner in an attempt to save weight for AT use.  Boot Gloves will help, but part of the problem is coming up from the bottom where they do no good.

Interesting observation. Thanks for the insight!

post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 

I'm also fighting cold toes in these boots.  Today I had the shop do a toe punch to free up a little room and I'm trying some compression socks, if that doesn't work it's time to break out the intuitions and/or hotronics I suppose.  Love them otherwise, just wish I could have warmer feet.

post #26 of 27

Love these boots, saw this thread, couldn't resist replying. I know quite a bit about socks and footwear. I use waterproof knee-high goretex socks for walking knee deep in the snow or cold streams - keeps it warm and dry.  I actually like the flexibility of a less warm liner in cochise 130: when colder, I put a warmer sock. When warmer, e.g. skiing resort in the 30's or on tough climbs in 20's I put highly breathable thin socks and my feet don't sweat as much, and stay warm enough in cochise.  With intuition liners I always get sweaty feet skiing hard and fast, and sweaty leads to cold feet later, especially on the lifts or on breaks in the backcountry.

 

I'm used to skiing with cold sweaty feet from young age, as I'm sure most of you, so I can tolerate a full day of cold feet, but it's nice that cochise liners are not sweaty by default, and can always be made warmer by warmer socks.

 

Btw, I did the boot fitting with warmer socks, but when I wear a thinner sock I just clamp down more with the buckles. Micro adjustments on the buckles work great too.

 

I also like that cochise boots are not 100% waterproof, because waterproof = always less ventilation = more sweaty feet.  I prefer the flexibility of using the boot cover in powder to waterproof when I need it.  Bootcover also adds warmth of course.

 

Another thing that is great for this liner is it prevents toe bang on landing from jumps, because of the extra inch of space between the liner tip and the shell.

 

ABOUT TAKING OUT THE LINERS, RIPPING, ETC:

I took out these liners exactly 8 times to change from din to tech and back.  Did it carefully with the boot horn, no damage.  I don't take out any liners for any other reason - much faster and less work to use boot dryers or a hair dryer :).  Years back I would just stuff em with paper towels overnight + put next to a room heater at the right distance.

 

Hope this helps!

Kate.

post #27 of 27
On older 26.5 120s with 27 Intuition Power wraps and chicken legs. Great heel hold for me, and the slightly wider last is a treat in the 5th met head area. One day up and down. The boot top felt a little loose around the top of my calf without the big rear spoiler in. So in experimenting I tried putting the thin, semi-flexible rear spoiler from my old Langes between the front of the liner and shell sticking about 40% above the top of the shell... And it was like instant heaven. And it turns out the black material on this years intuitions is like one side of a sheet of Velcro...
the spoilers stick!

Still need a tiny big toe punch for skinning. On the down they are perfect.
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