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Review: Luddite Charger

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Kudos to the Ski Luddite Thread for this good find. I got the Elan 777  for $89 + ship

 

Mounted with a pair of Griffons I picked up for $139 on black Friday. This has been a very economical addition to my quiver.

 

On to the review:

 

1000

 

Product: Elan 777 

Length Tested: 192

Dimensions/Turn Radius: 117-87-107 / 26.1

Camber (select one, delete the rest): Traditional

Binding: Griffon 13

Mount point:  On the line

 

Environment & Conditions: Early WROD

Location of Test: Snowbasin

Number of Runs: 8 run on middle bowl chair

Snow Conditions: manmade groomers early

Demo or Own: Own

 

Tester Info:

Username: tromano

Age: 34

Height/Weight: 5'10" / 205

Ski Days/Season: 30-50

Years Skiing: 20

Aggressiveness: Moderate(Finesse)

Current Quiver: Blizzard The One 184, DPS RP 190, Dynastar Huge Trouble 185, Praxis Powder 185

Home Area: Snowbasin

Preferred Terrain (select one/all, delete the rest):  off-piste & trees

 

 

Review:

 

Short version: These things like to go fast. 

 

Long version: I went out today at snowbasin for my first day of the season. Not much terrain was open, only middle bowl chair with sweet revenge and very little else. Some ungroomed bumps, and a terrain park. It reminded me very much of 7Springs where I used to ski in PA. So I took out the new all mountain boards to see how they would do. 

 

Elan was a ski brand I had completely ignored / not known about. I bought these based on a whim after reading the luddite thread and a perceived need to replace the Dynastar Sultan 85s in my quiver. 

 

After a few runs to get a feel for sliding on snow again, it was time to try some carving. Once I got the feel for them, it was game on, these things love to go fast and I didn't have enough room to really give them a thorough test at the speeds they were happiest going. I was making 2 turns down most of the steeper rollers on sweet revenge and the skis were begging for even more speed.  These things really like to go fast and respond well to edging and pressure early in the turn. They have a bit of a playful feel, but it really doesn't come out until about 30 mph. I was grinning when I was able to get them into the air off some rollers in the trail. 

 

Shorter and more medium sized at medium to lower speeds the skis did not want to hook up cleanly or carve reliably. Could be a technique issue on my part, but the skis did not seem to be naturally good at this. 

 

I did some slower speed moguls a few times, the skis were predictable and absorbed the terrain pretty well in the bumped up snow, this was not proper moguls, more like whales from the snow guns that had some ruts carved in them. I will give the ski an incomplete grade but its worth mentioning the good early results. 

 

The feel was smooth and refined, about half way between Blizzard and Head. And the forgiveness was I think decently high. The ski never reacted poorly to any thing I did, not even my tossing them around on my first run as I was trying to get my technique together and get a feel for my boots, edges, balance, all at the same time. 

 

This is a ski that is very different from other skis in my quiver and really seems like a good ski to have at a place like snowbasin with the wide open trails and lots of room to turn. 

 


Edited by tromano - 11/24/12 at 3:57pm
post #2 of 6

Oh, old school 777's!  I remember it as a superb "big terrain" ski, really solid, not much of a speed limit.  I remember it well, a real skier's ski!  Probably not as friendly as a modern ski, no?  I remember having a very good feel for my edges on that ski, thinking it was quite laterally stiff and reactive.  Great in crud too.  Let us know what you think after you have you winter legs back! 
 

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

Oh, old school 777's!  I remember it as a superb "big terrain" ski, really solid, not much of a speed limit.  I remember it well, a real skier's ski!  Probably not as friendly as a modern ski, no?  I remember having a very good feel for my edges on that ski, thinking it was quite laterally stiff and reactive.  Great in crud too.  Let us know what you think after you have you winter legs back! 
 

 

I would agree, especially the part about feeling the edges on these. And I think it will only get better as more terrain opens up and I can open the throttle even further, it was a bit of a WROD today.

 

Comparing them to a modern ski e.g. something like the 181 cm Blizzard 8.5 TI that I demoed last year, the modern skis were easier to ski. But its not an apples to apples comparison and I am not convinced the performance parameters are the same. These are 192 cm long and therefore not many real comparisons in terms of length, at least not that I have ridden. Modern all mountain skis near 87 under foot don't seem to come in lengths above 188 any more. Also the shape, these are a very skinny straight ski, not many skis this narrow are this straight, most seem much more shapely. I would want to spend time on something close to an equal length before I could make a fair comparison. 

 

This is a very solid "groomer" ski without being a fat carver. And I use the term groomer with quotes, these groomers went from ice to slush to pushpiles, to rutted brake bumps in a few meters. 

 

I spent alot of time on the Sultan 85 and these ski nothing like them, The sultan is a very shapely and fairly medium flexing ski. These are straight and pretty stiff flexing. the closest thing to that I have skied is the head im88 back in the day. 


Edited by tromano - 11/24/12 at 8:46pm
post #4 of 6

I picked up the same deal as tromano but with $52.00 Head Freeflex 14s. Mounted a great setup for under $200.00.

 

I agree with the skis need for speed on the hard packed. I first skied them at the Copper Speed Center on their opening day so was able to let them rip. Lots of fun, a burly ski that wants to fly. You really have to work them to get them to make smaller turns. I got them for an all mountain ski so piste performance is secondary. I can get them to make the turns I want whether carved or not so I expect they'll be a go to ski for me.

 

I'm looking forward to getting them on the soft snow (soon I hope, although the forecast is for sunny and mild into next week).

post #5 of 6

Mine are mounted with Tyrolia d10 FF+17s, purchased a few years back from Level Nine for $59.  A sweet <$200 charging rig that was my primary spring setup this year.

 

I agree with your comments generally, tromano.  They are, somewhat paradoxically, very playful at speed.  They are also great crudbusters.  And for a stiff, conventionally cambered midfat, they actually float fairly well if you know how to get such a ski to float.  They remind me of my late lamented Big Stix 84s.

post #6 of 6

I also got these skis last spring. Have yet to put bindings on them yet. I was thinking of stealing the Marker 1200s off another older pair of skis. I got mine for $99. I thought that they would be a fun ski and a can't miss at that price. Great to hear the skis are working well for such a steal in price.

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