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All sitski / monoski users, coaches help wanted!!!

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Hi everybody,

 

my name is Luka Jelaska, and I am student of industrial design in Croatia.

I am working on new sitski / monoski project, which tends to be in two years from now in phase ready for production, as it is self-initiated project.

 

As I don't want to skip any of key aspects of that product such as construction, function, materials, ergonomics, dynamics and aesthetics, I am trying to do as much as fundamental research as possible.

 

In my country there is only one athlete that uses adaptive skis professional, but as much as he can help me I need more information from as much as possible users, coaches that know about that sport, product and could help me.

So I hope everybody in here that could help me will try to do it by answering some questions that I have prepared, and find useful for further progress of my research.

 

Thank you in advance for your help, as much useful answers I get, it's bigger chance for project to realise!

The questions are based for users, but please all the coaches with experience in that sport try to help as much as u can with your answers, or additional suggestions what to look for when developing sitski product.

 


1.  What level of disability do you have?

2.  What monoski / sitski do you use/have tried?

3.  Do you sitski for recreation or professional?

4.  What are, in your opinion, based on your experience, the advantages, disadvantages on each one of them?

 

5.  What kind of suspension /  shock absorber do they have, could it be adjusted and in which way?
 
6.  What is the difference in skiing by adjusting the seating angle of the seat/leg support?

1000

 

1000

 

1000



7.  What is the difference in skiing by adjusting the seating height from the ground?

1000

 

1000

 

1000

 



8.  Do you/did you use chairlift/ lift anchor with your sitski / sitski that u used?

     Can you do it by yourself, or did you need help from somebody around?

 

1000

 

1000

 



9.  I You could choose between adjustability and light weight of sitski, what would you prefer more?

     What adjustability you couldn''t  compromise?

10. Based on adjustability, what do you find useful to adjust right away on the snow?

11. Do you know someone who is interested in adaptive skiing, but for some reason he/she does not ski?
      What is that reason?

 

12. In general, what are the disadvantages in adaptive skiing that, in your opinion, could be improved?

 

Any additional advices are welcome!

 

Thank you again for your help!

 

Luka Jelaska

post #2 of 24

I'm not super familiar with the construction/design of sitskis, but this looks like its pretty well thought out.  I'm anxious to hear what some of the adaptive people have to say about it. 

post #3 of 24

Aren't sitskis custom made for each skier according to the individual needs and skills of each skier? Is the OP trying to design "one size fits all" or adapts to all?confused.gif

post #4 of 24

I assume you will also be contacting other sites specifically focused on sitskis such as

http://www.adaptivesportsforums.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?5-Winter-Sports

Regarding DanoT's comment about sitskis being custom made. In my limited experience some are custom made 'from scratch' but most are bought following general parameters then modified to fit the individual much like ski boots. However unlike ski boots where everyone is assumed to have a foot of a certain general shape and general level of functionality, sitkskiers are much more diverse in nature and more ingenuity is required. I am sure there are other key issues but two that have been most pressing in my volunteer work have bee

1- balancing the skier and rig so they are over the correct mounting point of the ski so the ski functions properly

2- finding a fool proof, 100% reliable chairlift loading/unloading  mechanism. Failure here can be catastrophic. 

post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 


2 DanoT - Most stuff on sitskis like seat, seating angle, shock absorber preload, is adjusted after taking measurements of user, but some stuff like seat type not compromising comfort over control, chairlift mechanism if there is some, choosing the right cost effective materials, and deciding what is defined once the customer ordered it, and what can and what cant be adjusted after it, are the places where I can try to improve the whole product considering each one as most important.

 

2Castle Dave - thank you for the link, I posted in another topic improving the monoski from other member, but no replies like he got from users so I posted another topic.

 

Thank you for your opinion on priorities, as much suggestions, and asnwers I get, that much well based the product could be.

The first one is definitely one of the most important priority through development. The second one Is also very imporatant, but also saw that some rigs dont have any of mechs for chairlifts, so user should lift himself and the rig with the ski by his hands up, and that rigs are still selling well.

 

That is why i got this questions that I will find useful considering your answers, I will get the whole picture on priorities and key facts to start from developing the product.

post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by LukaJ View Post


 The second one Is also very imporatant, but also saw that some rigs dont have any of mechs for chairlifts, so user should lift himself and the rig with the ski by his hands up, and that rigs are still selling well.

 

 

Having a self loading mechanism certainly complicates things. Problem is only some skiers have the strength to self load without some kind of engineered assist mechnism like the Praschberger but it has problems too.

Here is a post I did to Adabptive ski

http://www.adaptivesportsforums.com/forums/showthread.php?851-solution-ot-Praschberger-chair-offload-problem

post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Castle Dave View Post

Having a self loading mechanism certainly complicates things. Problem is only some skiers have the strength to self load without some kind of engineered assist mechnism like the Praschberger but it has problems too.

Here is a post I did to Adabptive ski

http://www.adaptivesportsforums.com/forums/showthread.php?851-solution-ot-Praschberger-chair-offload-problem


Great improvisation Castle Dave! But that is exactly the problem that I think monoski users should not be improvising on such product. Also I find a Drawback on that solution that shock absorber is being unprotected from upcoming chairlift and hitting it. The shock absorber was never meant to bi hit perpendicular to its main axis.

 

I know it complicates things, but I will put chairlift mechanism to my priorities too. Because I think that development of such products should progress forward.

These products are expensive to develop, to test, and to produce each one of them to adapt each customer body measurements.

That is why each knew product that is developed should have good progress and benefits against current solutions.

 

If you have any of friends, monoski users that you know, and might not be on this forum, it would be great to ask them those few questions to help me find just right amount of informations to move on further with development. I would be very grateful for your help, and also one day you might be grateful for a good product that could come from this research, and you as a kind of a participant in it!

 

Thank You again for your help!

post #8 of 24

If you can get in touch with some of the manufacturers it should help you.  The KBG (Kevin Bramble Goodz) Monoski is considered one of the best.  The fellows that I know that ride them swear by them.

 

Here's a couple of links for the KBG.

 

http://accessanythingreviews.blogspot.com/2009/04/kevin-bramble-goodz-monoski-5000.html

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_Bramble

 

http://www.axsvail.org/winter/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=24&Itemid=42

  This page has a link to Kevin's e-mail.  I could not find Kevin's website.

 

Here's a link to Freedom Factory.  They make several types of equipment:  http://www.freedomfactory.org/

 

Here's a link to Spokes N Motion.  They are another supplier of adaptive equipment:  http://www.spokesnmotion.com/catalog/category.asp?category_id=100

post #9 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Square View Post

If you can get in touch with some of the manufacturers it should help you.  The KBG (Kevin Bramble Goodz) Monoski is considered one of the best.  The fellows that I know that ride them swear by them.

 

Here's a couple of links for the KBG.

 

http://accessanythingreviews.blogspot.com/2009/04/kevin-bramble-goodz-monoski-5000.html

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_Bramble

 

http://www.axsvail.org/winter/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=24&Itemid=42

  This page has a link to Kevin's e-mail.  I could not find Kevin's website.

 

Here's a link to Freedom Factory.  They make several types of equipment:  http://www.freedomfactory.org/

 

Here's a link to Spokes N Motion.  They are another supplier of adaptive equipment:  http://www.spokesnmotion.com/catalog/category.asp?category_id=100


Thank you very much T-Square,

Any kind of help, experience, advices from people who have tried, are using, or know someone who does, people that are producing, coaching is great!

I already did contacted some companies like Tessier, Praschberger, DynAccess, Team HOC, Freedom Factory, and now I contacted Mr Kevin Bramble, but only few of them answered my email.

I hope Mr Bramble will too!

post #10 of 24

Have you considered contacting the Canadian Association for Disabled Skiing? They're a really approachable group and I imagine they'd be interested in improving sitski design. 

post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Have you considered contacting the Canadian Association for Disabled Skiing? They're a really approachable group and I imagine they'd be interested in improving sitski design. 
Thank you Metaphor, as I said any kind of information direction who coul help me is useful!
I just sent them email, and hope they will respond!
post #12 of 24
Why do you want to design a new mono-ski? Are the ones currently available not good enough? I mean, you can buy any number of monoskis right now that allow people to race at the world cup level, compete in the x-games, ski big mountain powder, do backflips, and perform every other skiing related activity. Are the monoskis available so flawed that you need to design a brand new one? I just don't understand your logic behind this project. Maybe you could clarify why you're doing this.
post #13 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaos View Post

Why do you want to design a new mono-ski? Are the ones currently available not good enough? I mean, you can buy any number of monoskis right now that allow people to race at the world cup level, compete in the x-games, ski big mountain powder, do backflips, and perform every other skiing related activity. Are the monoskis available so flawed that you need to design a brand new one? I just don't understand your logic behind this project. Maybe you could clarify why you're doing this.

 

There are a lot of different aspects you can look at the question why would I want to design a new mono-ski due to the fact thet current ones are just fine.

For the first one is that with all the technology of today, you still have to have compromise with adjustability over the weight, right amount of control over the comfort, etc.

Still some people aren't happy with some parts like a seat so they order aspen seat and example nissin mono-ski.

 

People are incredible species, they can adapt anything, but they can only adapt what they are offered. I am not saying that current mono-skis aren't good ''enough'', just that they could be a lot better. I know that all adaptive sports equipment is expensive, but then again I think the function in a whole, and product itself should justify the price. By that I mean that no such product should have mechanism for chairlift that could stuck if the user doesn't do some kind of improvising to make it work as it should in a first place.

 

Why would I want to design a mono-ski? Well because there are, in my opinion to many compromises to take from mono-ski users that, I don't think, they should be dealing with.

I am not saying I could make a revolution in it, just try to catch a solution to each problem that current products have, and that I will come up to with the mono-ski that I will try to make.

And of course I'm not alone into this, I will ask for any help from my professors for detailed examination of ergonomics, construction, dynamics and materials.

I will try to incorporate new technologies, materials and solutions that could help that product to come to another level.

My goal at first was to make it lighter, enough adjustable, with chairlift support, and if could, cheaper. Of course the last one and the first one is very hard to get together.


And If I will succeed in that, you may have another mono-ski on the market to try, test, choose, compete with, and if not I will still be richer for a great experience in development of such product, but of course, you may guess, my goal is the first one. ;)

post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaos View Post

Why do you want to design a new mono-ski? Are the ones currently available not good enough? I mean, you can buy any number of monoskis right now that allow people to race at the world cup level, compete in the x-games, ski big mountain powder, do backflips, and perform every other skiing related activity. Are the monoskis available so flawed that you need to design a brand new one? I just don't understand your logic behind this project. Maybe you could clarify why you're doing this.

Wow...salient question Chaosnonono2.gif....I would assume that these athletes are clamoring for the latest/greatest/fresh design...just like most of us.

 

 

  P.s. What-a inza-f***a iza chineze downhill?    ski.gif   (atlatl wink.gif)

post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by LukaJ View Post

For the first one is that with all the technology of today, you still have to have compromise with adjustability over the weight, right amount of control over the comfort, etc.
Still some people aren't happy with some parts like a seat so they order aspen seat and example nissin mono-ski.
You just described the nature of every piece of sporting equipment in the world. Sacrifice in one area of performance to excel in another.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LukaJ View Post

I am not saying that current mono-skis aren't good ''enough'', just that they could be a lot better.
A lot better how? Be specific. Seriously. Let's see some of your groundbreaking ideas on how you're going to make these sitskis better. Let's see some pics of your prototypes, your superior lightweight materials, your more functional parts, hinges, springs, shocks, seals, gaskets, bolts. Let's see what you got.

You come on here and tell us that you're going to create the one monoski that does everything better. Better comfort...but with all the control, better adjustability...but lighter weight without sacrificing durability? Better than Bramble, Praschberger, Tessier, Freedom Factory, HOC, Nissin. And then you ask us for advice on how to create that ski?

I appreciate your ambition but I think it's laughable. You know, most of the guys who design these monoskis- the ones that you're somehow going to magically improve upon- spend 150+ days a year in their sitskis. These guy eat, sleep and breathe adaptive equipment. It's all they do. We're talking about the best monoskiers in the world. And they spend all their time around other sitskiers getting feedback. And now some person from Croatia who is probably not a para and probably doesn't even know how to monoski is going to do it better? Gimme a break.
post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaos View Post


1. You just described the nature of every piece of sporting equipment in the world. Sacrifice in one area of performance to excel in another.
A lot better how? Be specific. Seriously. Let's see some of your groundbreaking ideas on how you're going to make these sitskis better. Let's see some pics of your prototypes, your superior lightweight materials, your more functional parts, hinges, springs, shocks, seals, gaskets, bolts. Let's see what you got.
2. You come on here and tell us that you're going to create the one monoski that does everything better. Better comfort...but with all the control, better adjustability...but lighter weight without sacrificing durability? Better than Bramble, Praschberger, Tessier, Freedom Factory, HOC, Nissin. And then you ask us for advice on how to create that ski?
3. I appreciate your ambition but I think it's laughable. You know, most of the guys who design these monoskis- the ones that you're somehow going to magically improve upon- spend 150+ days a year in their sitskis. These guy eat, sleep and breathe adaptive equipment. It's all they do. We're talking about the best monoskiers in the world. And they spend all their time around other sitskiers getting feedback. And now some person from Croatia who is probably not a para and probably doesn't even know how to monoski is going to do it better? Gimme a break.

 

1.  I must say that I wouldn't agree on that one. I think there are a lot of fine pieces of sporting equipment such as helmets, jackets, bicycles, that are just about perfect in each demand, and    user need. Of course the adaptive equipment is smaller ''market'' so the evolution of those products are going slower. As one member of another adaptive sports equipment said, ''The sitski products are now like mountain bikes 10 years ago'' so if you want to have better product, you must try to built one, again and again and again.

 

2. I didn't came here to tell you that I am going to create monoski that does everything better, you miss understood it somewhere. I said I will do my best to try to improve some of the problems on current solutions, and try to make construction that could save weight and keep enough adjustability.

And I didn't ask how to create  that ''better'' ski, I asked questions that I think that are relevant to my priorities in developing new ski, never asked you how would I solve some issue on it, that is my problem.

You see how much manufacturers you came up  to, and what is the difference in all of them? Some are better in some way, some in another. There is no product standing out of the crowd.

So was my goal that I am not trying to make evolution in that product. Manufacturers of each product in a world no matter what kind are those, can only do better if they experience current issues.

They have to make a product the best they could with all the issues solved from previous one, so that kind of circle never goes to the end. I am trying to relate to current products because I don't have current one.

 

3. I understand you're point of view, and of course I appreciate those people that are current manufacturers and developers from mono-ski market. It may be laughable to you, but it may also be useful to those people that will maybe have another option on the market, and will get a chance to participate in development and testing of that product, and maybe one day compete in it.

I don't understand why you seem to be so annoyed by my idea, will, and trying to make a better mono-ski. If I wouldn't think that there is a space to improve it, I wouldnt spend so many hours of research, contacting, reading all the experiences, looking for solutions for such problems in other sports equipment etc.

I hope that does not offend you the fact that I'm not para and trying to improve that mono-ski.

 

As zentune said, each industry tends to improve products, in each way, but that could happen only trying to improve it, and working on new ones again and again and again.

Some may fail, some may succeed, I said my goal is second one, but not that it will be.

 

My kind regards,

Luka J

post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by LukaJ View Post


You see how much manufacturers you came up  to, and what is the difference in all of them? Some are better in some way, some in another. There is no product standing out of the crowd.
If you say so. Obviously you're the expert on the matter.
post #18 of 24

So it depends on what your target audience really is.  There are several groups, newbies, recreational dependent, recreational dependent, off-piste independent, carvers, etc...  as with the many types of skis - racing, carving, powder, etc..., all with different cuts, and materials to get the results you want, you need to define who it is you are making this for.  Newbies and recrational are probably your largest market, as these are used for teaching, and integrating individuals into the sport.  these units are ususally highly adaptable as one unit could be used for several differnt body and disablity types.  If you are truly trying to crack the higher end market, a history of prodcut developmetn will suggest that you had better have a disability yourself and have lots of time and patience to create a unit that works well for you, that others will notice and hence want.  It seems most "good" units on the market have followed this path of development.  That said, I have really only been involved in teaching sit-sking for a couple of years now (2A) certified. 

 

Most of the guys I know that sit-ski, have moved up the scale, by starting off in one of these highly adaptable units 9say like and Mountain Man, or bi-unique), realizing they were skill limitations to this equipment or adjustability issues so they moved up to say an entry level mono by some manufacturer, say a Yeti or Praschberger, only to eventually reaize thay want further refinement and begin modifying that unit only to realize development of a custom unit for themselves is ultimately the only way... 

 

have a look at a friend of mine's set-up.  His rig allows him full control.  His rig was fully custom built of Titanium nad carbon fibrer which he built on his own.  it is a custom rig, and I don't know 3rd or 4th generation one of- Have a Google of Andy Van Grunsven.

 

I'm not suggesting you stop your quest, as I too am a Mech Eng contenplating whats out there, but just suggesting you define your target market place a little better before you dive in and put a lot of effort to make yet another product offering into a pretty large pool that is out there all ready.  Spend your time researching key product failures and try to overcome those with your unit.  Key aspects for me which most low to mid range units lack - independance for lift loading, weight, easy terrain adapability, breakdown for storage and transportation...

 

Best of luck!

Philip Cassidy (Canada)

post #19 of 24

So now that i have offered a little bit of my opinion, lets see about your questions

1. What level of disability do you have?

          I have no "disability".  I have been skiing for 38yrs, boarder for 12 or so, and instructing for almost 20yrs.  # years agao a friend of mine hit a tree skiing and became a paraplygic, and I wanted to get him back into skiing as part of his recovery, so I joined CADS and now instruct disabled skiiers.  I have been tethering sit-skis no 3 years, I guess more because of my strength and ski ability.  I have on various training days been in the sit-ski to learn from a teaching stand point.

2. What monoski / sitski do you use/have tried?

          Have not been in a mono yet, hopefully this year i'll get a chance.  Our CADs progran uses Mountain Man and Bi-Unique.  We have a couple of mono's in the equipment room, but very limited use.

3. Do you sitski for recreation or professional?

          I, as an able bodied person, do it to learn on how to teach better.  Okay it is quite fun too!

4. What are, in your opinion, based on your experience, the advantages, disadvantages on each one of them?

         That's a loaded question...  High level key issues, adaptability, weight, cost

 

5. What kind of suspension / shock absorber do they have, could it be adjusted and in which way?

         Coil over suspension type.  Adjsutability is like most coil overs - adjustability of a support ring to preload.  Also can change out the damper or spring to get required support for wieght of person or terrain type.

6. What is the difference in skiing by adjusting the seating angle of the seat/leg support?

          Adjsuting set angle as I understand it is for comfort of the user - the overall comfortable body position is impeotant to the user - think of sitting all day in that seat, strapped in - fatigue and preassure points become very important - Why do skiers often get custome bed liners for their boots?  If you do not know the answer ask the same to a hockey player...  comfort.  Bottom line is the more adjustablity the better comfort.  secondly once comfort position is found, now you would need to adjust the setup to be centered over the skis...

 

7. What is the difference in skiing by adjusting the seating height from the ground?

          Stability - lower to the ground is better when learning, as there is less distance to fall - For racing height needs to adjust with type of skiing - If you are too low, bucket may bottom out on the  hill in which case you may get washout and loose edge - not good!

 

8. Do you/did you use chairlift/ lift anchor with your sitski / sitski that u used?  Can you do it by yourself, or did you need help from somebody around?

          No anchor used as when we teach we have 2 instructors for each and hold the bucket to the back of the chair.

 

9. If you could choose between adjustability and light weight of sitski, what would you prefer more? What adjustability you couldn''t compromise?

          Another loaded question -  It really depends on what audience the sit-ski is to be for.  For teaching, I'd rather compromise weight over adjustability, and viceversa for an idivudual i would assume.  When demo-ing skis I like that they do not waste my time preping the skis to my boots, but for my skis i am not willing to carry the exrta weight for my daily boards - get it - demo bindings have added adjsutability that add weight?

10. Based on adjustability, what do you find useful to adjust right away on the snow?

          Ah, not sure really what the question is...  For teaching I need to adjust the bucket length for comfort and then re-adjust to be centered over the skis.  For a person who owns their own, well it should be just like a boot - all straps and settings should be set, to show up and strap in...

11. Do you know someone who is interested in adaptive skiing, but for some reason he/she does not ski?  What is the reason?

          Yes. Usually it is finances or age that dictates this.

 

12. In general, what are the disadvantages in adaptive skiing that, in your opinion, could be improved?

          Weight, cost and durability.  all 3 are required, but might need better balancing.  adapability features are all there, some more refined than others on certain units, but usually design is a comprimise of at least 1 of the 3.  The most durable designs tend to be costly, lightweight usually menas higher cost, and cheaper, means compromised durability.

 

Cheers,

Phil

post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 

First of all, thank you very much for your time and thoughtful post.

 

I get the idea what you are saying about targeting my market, and specific users. As I got the idea what you just confirmed that biggest problem in current mono-skis is the weight, costs, and enough adjustability and strength, those were some start goals to acquire for the new on to a new one.

 

For targeting the market between recreation and competitive mono-ski, I would like to start by putting higher goals of course, so it could be as less weight as possible, so maybe adjustability would be kept for teaching, and recreational models, then scaling the price downwards by using different materials, shocks etc. Also some of my goals are to improve routine for mono-ski users on the snow, like chairlifts, anchors... so there would be less assistance and help needed.

 

Unfortunately I didn't come up to any pictures of your friend's ski, just one video on youtube where its not so clear to see the mono-ski.

 

Thank you for all the answers as well, it's also a step forward to clear the picture of where I should be getting at.

 

My kind regards,

Luka

post #21 of 24

1. What level of disability do you have?

         T-12 Para

2. What monoski / sitski do you use/have tried?

          Revi-pro comp, nissan, HOC (edge and groove)

3. Do you sitski for recreation or professional?

          Rec for now, working on the pro thing.

4. What are, in your opinion, based on your experience, the advantages, disadvantages on each one of them?

         There is a lot to talk about here...  Weight and position are the big factors to me (cost also, but I didn't buy all of them...)  I prefer to have as compact fore/aft position as possible (it helps keep the 'swing weight' down so innitiating turns is EZer, and whipping some short radius turns in steeps is also betting in this configuration...)  Able Bodied (AB's) skiers have most of their mass directly over where they want it.  while most Mono's adjust enough to get us sitting over the 'ball of the foot', some have the feet way out in front (this seems to be going away - even the new bramble allows you to drop the feet).  The problem with dropping the feet is that - you can only go so low before your feet will bottom out before the suspension will...  (feet go down, ski bends up and all that clearance goes away quick...)  HOC solves this by keeping the feet stationary (on the edge) but this has some strap issues for some people...  I just remember going from a revolution with a feet out possition, to a Nissan with a 'compact' possition, and I was blown away by how quick I could whip the ski around...

 

5. What kind of suspension / shock absorber do they have, could it be adjusted and in which way?

         all had coil over...  I believe most had general compression/ re-bound damping and preload also (and you can swap spring rates...)  These work great - and nicer coil overs are availible (with hi/low - or 4 way damping).  I don't know all the issues of going to an air shock, but if it could save some weight (over a pound) and give the same performance, that would be awesome...  but a nice coil shock with a ti spring seems to be good and have minimal issues...

6. What is the difference in skiing by adjusting the seating angle of the seat/leg support?

         It depends on the disability.  some guys have full control of abs, and even use of some leg muscles (or all use of what leg muscle they have -amputees...) See above about keeping 'swing weight' down.  I ski with a good amount of 'dump' in my bucket (but low, knees high, feet low)  this is because I'm tall (6' 2") and am trying to keep the swing weight down as much as possible (even found some good lightweight boots...)

 

7. What is the difference in skiing by adjusting the seating height from the ground?

          Stability/ performance/ ease of loading... - Like has been said, low is good for beginners - and we move up from there usually.  (I've seen a lot of people starting in a HOC groove, and they seem to handle that well - which is actually decently up there.)  Also, the higher the rig, the less you have to lift yourself up to get on the lift...  this can be a problem if you are too high, as the lift will just push you from behind and you won't actually have your butt (or rig) on the lift untill you start to go into the 'pit'.  This has been a problem with the Nissan while in the load position, and a lot of the guys remove the "up lock" pin, so when they are in 'load' mode, they are not lifting the ski and bottom 1/2 of the rig - making it a good amount EZer, and solving the 'too high to get on the lift' problem.  

 

8. Do you/did you use chairlift/ lift anchor with your sitski / sitski that u used?  Can you do it by yourself, or did you need help from somebody around?

          When I was learning, the would kinda lock me to the lift with a strap.  now, I don't use anything - getting off of lifts tends to be a decent problem, so I'm usually not worried about just falling off.  Surface lifts are also a pain, but I don't think there is a great way to solve that for us (but i'm open to suggestions)  

 

9. If you could choose between adjustability and light weight of sitski, what would you prefer more? What adjustability you couldn''t compromise?

          Again - for a ski program - needs to be adjustable.  For personal rig, make it as light as possible.  If I could tell you - I want my feet here, knees here and butt here - and didn't have any adjustment after that (custom rig) and it was 4 lbs lighter than the lightest rig out there (making it 16-18 lbs) I'd be all over it

10. Based on adjustability, what do you find useful to adjust right away on the snow?

          Possibly the shock, but that's it.  Once we get our rig set, it's unusual to want to adjust it daily...  O yeah, one thing that is nice if there is a clamshell type bucket (seat) - some people like to be able to adjust the forward lean of the backrest part - well, it would only need 2 positions - skiing (leaning forward a decent amount , and - not skiing (leaning back a little for riding the chairs, or hanging out...

11. Do you know someone who is interested in adaptive skiing, but for some reason he/she does not ski?  What is the reason?

          money is big.  all that goes into skiing plus a 3-$6000 rig - it's a lot to take on...  

 

12. In general, what are the disadvantages in adaptive skiing that, in your opinion, could be improved?

          It's been said before - weight, cost, durability...  for me - make it super light - make it decently durable - and the cost is the cost...  I like rigs with no 'load' mechanism (less stuff to break - and lighter usually)  I like the HOC rigs (and the new Bramble has caught my eye) however, these guys build them with Xgames stuff in mind...  I don't want to launch myself off crazy jumps at high speeds - and most monos don't (we have a lot of hardware in out backs, so jumping hurts...)  I do like to go fast - and maybe drop something now and then with a nice steep landing...  

 

One thing to note that isn't really on your list - the way the suspension travels.  A lot of rigs move the center of mass forward as the suspension compresses.  This isn't ideal - straight up and down or even very slightly back would be better...

 

Also - if you want to improve greatly on something - make a binding that won't pull out of a ski and won't release on us...  and allows for the ski to flex under foot...  That would be awesome.

 

 

let me know if ya need any other input from an actual mono skier - 

 

take it easy - 

post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 

2 Justrolln - Thank you very much for a lot of detailed and useful answers.

A lot of them is confirmation for more facts that I went for, and few of them new like the travel of suspension you said it would be better to go straight down or even a little bit backward.

That kind of facts are the ones that I am looking for, but also would need some confirmation from more users to prove it is not just personal thing than a real improvement to the control of the ski.

 

Currently I am working on amputee version, since I am working with one who is pro at it, but tend to do both versions.

 

Thank you again for that fundamental answers that sure will help with going for some advantages and innovations with new sitski.

post #23 of 24

For sure - 

 

you'll see that the rigs that most racers run are really close to going straight up and down - or even slightly back (HOC edge, scarver, nissan...)  The higher the disability, the more important this becomes.  This is because those with lower disabilities can adjust body position a lot to make up for a forward traveling shock (they can lean back a bit during the apex of a turn yet still get forward to initiate the next turn.)  Higher injuries will usually run a higher backrest, and do not have the back or ab muscles to make such a move, so they are dependent on what the shock does...  The good thing is - if it is set up so higher injury guys can ski it fast - us lower guys can also take advantage of it, and it makes laying nice carves (skiing as efficently <fast> as possible) all that much EZier...

 

Some other things I've though of.

 

Travel.  I wouldn't ski a rig anywhere without 6 or so inches of travel.  If I was thinking about jumping at least 8-10 would be nice...

 

it would be awesome to be able to change out the whole shock relatively quickly.  (this is if it is a spring based shock...)  the reason is - we run different settings for different conditions (really firm groomers = fairly stiff.  Powder or mixed conditions would be a bit softer and usually a different rebound setting.  It would be awesome to just have 2 shocks and swap them out for the days conditions (or even swap at lunch if things change a bit.)  that way you don't have to remember all the compression/rebound damping settings for each style you like (and you can run different springs also - something I would probably do for sure.)

 

I'll let ya know if I think of anything else!

post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 

2 Justrolln thank you very much for detailed answers it did help a lot to figure out some stuff and priorities.


Right now I am at my final stage my definding requirements, for written part of my college work.

All I need more is 1 minute of your time for a short survey that I need to make to satisfy my professors and official part of the project.

I really tried to make this survey as short as it could to get the most that I need, and hope you all will take a minute for my project and I can ensure you this wont be just an ink on paper project.

 

THank you all in advance, I''ll try to keep you updated with the project, as it is for now too early to show first concept renders

 

Kind regards,

Luka J

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