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Plastic scapers all the same?

post #1 of 62
Thread Starter 

i have been waxing my own skis for a season now, I am using the cheap scraper that came with some one ball jay wax I bought (I now buy bulk from tognar).

 

Are some more durable than others? Anyone recommend a good place to buy them? If they are all the same, a good cheap place.

 

Thanks,

Brad

post #2 of 62

You want the Lexan ones. They stay sharp longer.

post #3 of 62

I prefer thick ones - 5-6mm. However, any will do if you sharpen them after each scrape - takes 3 seconds with bastard file mounted on your bench with 90deg guide...

 

Here is picture showing manual setup 1a.  Instead of holding it by hand you can screw the file to the guide.

 

post #4 of 62

What crf said.  That's the way I keep mine sharp too but I use a panzar.  I only use the file to set the edges and use a drywall screen to keep them sharp.  I also use a plastic scouring pad to scrape the wax off the edges so I get better contact with the ski and don't clog the file/screen when sharpening.

 

RaceWax.com is having a balck Friday sale and everything is 20% off.  He has 5 mm scrapers and is a Sponsor here.  http://www.epicski.com/t/115233/20-off-at-racewax-com-with-coupon-black20

post #5 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by cfr View Post

I prefer thick ones - 5-6mm

 

 

I mostly use 5mm but 3 or 4mm is nice when parts of the ski are a bit concave (or convex depending on your point of view.

post #6 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 

I mostly use 5mm but 3 or 4mm is nice when parts of the ski are a bit concave (or convex depending on your point of view.


Good point. Thinner ones you can slightly bend to get to concave parts of the base.

post #7 of 62

I miss using my steel scraper and hate using the plastic ones but seems I was out-voted by the experts on here so I use plastic now.
 

post #8 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by my poor knees View Post

I miss using my steel scraper and hate using the plastic ones but seems I was out-voted by the experts on here so I use plastic now.
 

 

False dichotomy - they both have a role. 

post #9 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

False dichotomy - they both have a role. 

Yup...typically one would use a steel scraper for anything from removal of excess base repair material (p-tex) to cutting off the hairs that appear as a result of a stone grind. Conversely, plastic is less aggressive in terms of ski base removal, and therefore is desirable for wax removal.

 

 P.s. Keep your plastic scraper sharp, cantunamunch! You won't hate it AS muchwink.gif


Edited by zentune - 11/24/12 at 8:58pm
post #10 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

False dichotomy - they both have a role. 

Same here. I've got a crippled up finger this fall that really limits the scraping pressure I can exert, so......................I'm just very gentle with the steel scraper.

 

So far, the skis have not burst into balls of flames!

post #11 of 62
Thread Starter 

Where can you find a scrapper like post #3, I am having trouble finding one online.

post #12 of 62

Errr...what?   The scraper sharpening methods in post #3 work with /any/ scraper, and the only scraper shown is a generic rectangular one.   I am really hard pressed to believe you can't find one online.

 

http://www.racewax.com/product/RB-2420/RaceWax-Ski-Wax-Scraper-Stiff-and-Sharp.html

http://www.slidewright.com/briko-maplus-fat-ski-and-snowboard-plexi-scraper-260-x-70-x-5mm_mt0515.html

http://www.artechski.com/holmenkol-wax-scraper-5-mm-thick-6619.aspx#.ULWtqVJKp8E

http://www.tognar.com/tognar-snowboard-wax-scraper-12/

http://www.reliableracing.com/detail.cfm?edp=10017069

http://www.rei.com/product/840656/dakine-10-in-scraper

http://www.race-werks.com/svst-supreme-wax-scraper/

 

If you really need /curved/ scrapers like the one in the 4th pic from top, you can look here

http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=32639&cat=1,310,41069

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Hall View Post

Where can you find a scrapper like post #3, I am having trouble finding one online.


Edited by cantunamunch - 11/27/12 at 9:36pm
post #13 of 62

Or just go to home depot and buy a scrap piece of plexi, cut it to any shape you want.

 

I don't know the value of having a curved scraper with regards to scraping skis.  I would be overly concerned with too much pressure being applied in one spot causing a ski to have a groove.  I tend to try and make sure the scraper is straight.  Without a doubt, there are times to put a little bend in the scraper to get a little focus in one spot, but the scraper should be designed so you have to force that to happen and not happen without you intentionally doing it.

 

JMO,

Ken


Edited by L&AirC - 11/28/12 at 3:58am
post #14 of 62
Thread Starter 

Sorry, I meant scraper "sharpener" like post #3.

post #15 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Hall View Post

Sorry, I meant scraper "sharpener" like post #3.

roflmao.gif

 

Same answer as before...sort of.

 

At the top of that is a file and a block of wood (just something to keep it square to the file).  I think panzar files work best.  One of the sites listed in post 12 sells a 12 inch one.  That's what I use.  A general purpose file will work too.

 

The big block used for honing is probably a stone of some sort.  I use a dry wall taping screen on a bench top with the block like in the first pic.

post #16 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

 P.s. Keep your plastic scraper sharp, cantunamunch! You won't hate it AS muchwink.gif

+1 on that. I sharpen often during the course of scraping each ski. A really sharp scraper makes the effort much easier. I use a now unavailable Holmenkol Pro Scraper Sharpener which has an adjustable tungsten blade that actually cuts some of the plastic with each pass. It is a great product that has made my tuning much easier.

post #17 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsirin View Post

+1 on that. I sharpen often during the course of scraping each ski. A really sharp scraper makes the effort much easier. I use a now unavailable Holmenkol Pro Scraper Sharpener which has an adjustable tungsten blade that actually cuts some of the plastic with each pass. It is a great product that has made my tuning much easier.

  I want to get one of those electric sharpenersbiggrin.gif!!!!

post #18 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

  I want to get one of those electric sharpenersbiggrin.gif!!!!

 


Me too!!! I was looking at them earlier today in a catalog.

post #19 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsirin View Post

 


Me too!!! I was looking at them earlier today in a catalog.

  I am ashamed, in fact, that Zentune H.Q. doesn't have onewink.gif

post #20 of 62

Don't forget to properly tune the plastic scraper on a 1/1 angle.  Just like tuning your poles.  Could lead to serious injury if not done regularly.

 

 

ROTF.gif

post #21 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post

Don't forget to properly tune the plastic scraper on a 1/1 angle.  Just like tuning your poles.  Could lead to serious injury if not done regularly.

 

 

ROTF.gif

  .5 & 3...for hard waxwink.gif

post #22 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post

Don't forget to properly tune the plastic scraper on a 1/1 angle.  Just like tuning your poles.  Could lead to serious injury if not done regularly.


ROTF.gif

Actually, isn't it 0/0?

You want ALL the edges at a 90* so they will work in either direction. I know everyone jokes about this but having a sharp scraper makes life so much easier and setting the scrapers edges exact means that each time you use the tool, it will perform the same way.
post #23 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post


Actually, isn't it 0/0?
You want ALL the edges at a 90* so they will work in either direction. I know everyone jokes about this but having a sharp scraper makes life so much easier and setting the scrapers edges exact means that each time you use the tool, it will perform the same way.

  Yes, it does make it far easier. I usually sharpen mine before every scrape-at a 90*. Saves a lot of effort and is more effective...

post #24 of 62

Try this for a sharpener...

 

Heavy duty staple a  square of coarse grit sandpaper to your bench.  Screw a small block of scrap down on top of it so sandpaper protrudes on both sides.  Viola. @ 90degree guide.  Hold scraper firmly against block and scrub back and forth vigorously.

post #25 of 62

Out in the field (I mean the resort parking lot) I'll use the edge of my ski to sharpen and square up a scraper edge if I still need to scrape.  Ya, it might ever so slightly dull a 1/8th inch section of your edge but a small price to pay in order to have a nice freshly sharpened scraper when trying to get ready to hit the mountain.

post #26 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsirin View Post

 I use a now unavailable Holmenkol Pro Scraper Sharpener which has an adjustable tungsten blade that actually cuts some of the plastic with each pass. It is a great product that has made my tuning much easier.

 

Have you seen the SVST unit?  

post #27 of 62

I have one of these and don't like it:

 

 

 

While this does not look like the Holmenkol one, it seems to have a similar operation and, if I were replacing mine, I'd be inclined to try this:

 

Slide Wright sells this for something like $90 which is about 50 to 100% more than I paid for the Holmenkol unit a few years ago, although mine has a plastic housing. I wonder if this can be attached to the bench? I find one handed sharpening to promote more frequent sharpening. Mine has a clamp that holds it down at an edge of my table. SVST makes great stuff, every piece I have from them is a pleasure to use (except of course, the one I just said I didn't like).

post #28 of 62

That top one is more fit for restoring nordic klister scrapers, imo, like the classic Swix T87 dogbone.  

 

 

 

(It is actually awesome for that, since you can dunk the scraper into wax remover afterwards).

 

 

And, yes, the one at bottom is the one I had meant.

post #29 of 62

I could have used some wax remover a few days ago when I did the annual deep cleaning of my tuning area. I would not put it on my skis but getting the wax off my bench and the ceramic tiles I use for my iron stand were a job. I did take apart my scraper sharpener and got all of the wax dust out. Luckily, I've been using a taped down plastic 9' x 12' drop cloth for the area so the floor was not too bad but it is still a big dirty job. 
 

post #30 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post


Actually, isn't it 0/0?
You want ALL the edges at a 90* so they will work in either direction. I know everyone jokes about this but having a sharp scraper makes life so much easier and setting the scrapers edges exact means that each time you use the tool, it will perform the same way.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

  Yes, it does make it far easier. I usually sharpen mine before every scrape-at a 90*. Saves a lot of effort and is more effective...

 

The reason why people are joking is who is scraping at such a precise angle?  You're not using a jig when you're doing the actual scraping, and nobody is Bender Bending Rodriguez where you can hold the scraper at exactly 45* or 47* or maybe 46* or whatever.   So as long as it's reasonably at 90*, consistent along it's full length, sharp, and cleared of wax,good to go.

 

 

As far as getting stuff from concave or funky portions of the ski,  I happen to use old hotel keycards/creditcards to floppily clear away most of the excess wax in hard to get spots.  

It doesn't matter so much, as I brush to even everything out.

 

For OP's question.  Not too much rocket science to it.  If you have an old scraper follow the  tips to sharpen or clean the tool it will revive it and be good to go.   As far as buying a new scraper, I'd say just pick up whatever is reasonably cheap at a ski/sports store.  Don't buy it online if you have to pay for shipping.

 

For cleaning, the wax I use will melt in less than boiling temp (not the same as recommended melting point for your iron).  So I just pour boiling water over it and other tools, and swirl the tool around in the hot water.  If there happens to be some residue, it can just be wiped off with a paper towel.    This won't work if you happen to like to use cold waxes.

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