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Base edge damage

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I have too many skis and damage my skis too often to take them to a shop everytime I damage the edges or the bases, so I repair my own core shots and base damage with a base repair iron, a grinder dremel tool and a ski visions planar.

 

Most of what I've read has really suggested not to touch your base edges with a file, except for right after a stone grind (otherwise you'll slowly move towards being base-high and higher degree base bevels).

 

If you get some rock damage on your edges, and there are rock-hardened burrs sticking up on the base edge side, what's the best way to remove these at home on the tuning bench?

post #2 of 10

I do it with a coarse diamond file in a base edge guide, just where the damage is.

post #3 of 10

I start with the coarse diamond file (100) in the SVST base edge guide and then make passes with the finer diamonds (200/400/1000). You usually have to also redo the side edge in the area or you will probably leave a pretty good burr. The trick is to just let the diamond stone do its work without putting extra pressure on it.

post #4 of 10

If you only stone the burr until it's flush with the rest of the edge it shouldn't change the base relief at all. 

post #5 of 10

 I like the swix t240 dual sided stone, freehand with a water based lubricant...it has a course side, and a fine grit side. It makes it really easy to isolate the area of concern and fits comfortably in your hand. Use with LIGHT pressure until the burr is removed and smooth. If your not comfortable without a guide...use one. Although realistically, the base bevel grows as the season progresses (depends how many days you get in..e.g. .a 1 may grow to a 1.5) so your base beveler may no longer be appropriate, in terms of accuracy, anyway...

post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

Although realistically, the base bevel grows as the season progresses (depends how many days you get in..e.g. .a 1 may grow to a 1.5) so your base beveler may no longer be appropriate, in terms of accuracy, anyway...

How does this happen if you're aren't touching your base edge (except for removing burrs)?

post #7 of 10
friction...but depends a lot on hardness of snow...higher heat/debris take a toll...but again it depends on how many days you ski. If it is a lot (30-60??) then it can be an issue
post #8 of 10
to further clarify (typin on a phone, sorry)) one could say...agressive skier/higher speeds/harder snow/more days=more wear and less agressive/lower speeds/softer snow/less days=less wear...
post #9 of 10

Zentune, would you say it's more about the abrasive forces against the snow taking microscopic amounts of steel off each turn, or is some of it the mechanical forces against the base edge slightly bending/displacing the entire steel edge piece relative to it's integration into the base of the ski?

post #10 of 10
i suppose such a thing could be possible, but unlikley...i would say that almost always it would be a friction/abrasivness issue
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