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Need some direction on Ski's

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

First off, New guy here. Hello!

 

I am trying to pick a ski for myself, but need a little help.

 

First trouble, having never taken a class, i don't know my ski ability. That sounds dumb. Here in the mid-atlantic, I comfortably ski everything we have. I thought i was really something before going to Vermont and finding out a double black in WV or PA, is a lot different. HA! I did fine on everything there and did ok on a few tree runs. I try my luck with a jib here and there but thats another comedy! I consider myself more advanced but I don't do well on moguls at all! I do venture off the cat-trax though.

 

Anyway, I am currently on a set of Line - Masterminds, 2011, 157cm. I think they may be a little short as I am 5'9 and 150lbs. I like the general design but i feel like it wonders in the crud and fluff. It also feels a little unstable on landing at higher speeds. I love the flex though.

 

Now to add to this equation, I am moving to Colorado in a week. I have my eye on the Line - Blend or Chronics but don't want to dump money on a setup I'll be swapping out next season.

 

Any direction on this would be awesome. Binding suggestion would be epic too!

post #2 of 9

 Hi and welcome.

  Sounds like your having fun, also sounds like that if you invested in a couple of private lessons that you'd have a LOT MORE fun. It is so easy to pick up bad habits when you self teach. Often people end up skiing faster because it FEELS like they are in more control.

 If you knew how to ski moguls you might find you enjoy them more too.

  If your doing tree runs having had no lessons on skis that feel "unstable" and like they "wander off" then I hope you wear a helmet.

post #3 of 9

I think there is a very easy answer to this. The Salomon Rocker2 - 90 is what you are looking for. Despite what the travel brochures say, you will have soft-firm and semi-packed conditions at least 60-70% of the time in Co. When you do get deepish snow, it will generallt be light, fluffy, and pretty easy to ski.

 

Thje R2-90 has maybe the best blend of performance vs. price of any ski in this width range (for western snow). As all around tool it far exceeds the two Lines that you mention while still having just enough of a twin shape to accommodate 10% park usage.

 

SJ
 

post #4 of 9

Note to the OP, as others have said, do yourself a favor and take a few lessons.  Privates would be great, but a midweek group lesson is usally more like a semi-private.  I promise you, that 2-3 days of lessons with the same instructor will do absolute wonders for your skiing!  I know you did not mention boots, but before you upgrade your skis, take a very serious look at your boots and if they fit your feet properly.  A proper fitting boot is way more important than upgrading your skis at this point in your skiing career. 

 

Remember, the better you get the more fun you will have and the more fun you have the better you will get.  Lessons are a surefire way of achieving that.

 

Good luck and welcome to Epic Ski.

 

Rick G

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the great info.

 

I have been looking into a couple of private lessons just to help with my form and to make sure my methods are not just madness! 

 

Boots are an issue i have been dealing with since i first starting skiing, granted that was 20 years ago. Last season I picked up the Technica Phoenix air shell. After a couple runs i felt they were just damn uncomfortable and went back to my lange boots. I still feel like my heel and ankle have a little more movement then i would like. My local shop suggested trying a womens boot... i just, well.. yeah. 

 

I do were a helmet, no doubt. I didn't have near the issues in the trees that i had on the groomers. I was going slower though and it wasn't as icy. 

 

Thanks again!  

post #6 of 9

You asked about length.  At your level, probably something between chin and nose height.  I'm your size and my groomer skis are 172 cm.  Your current skis sound pretty short.

post #7 of 9

The Tecnica Phoenix is a perfect shape for carrying a football or for storing kleenex. If you have a rather "average" foot shape, you can do much better. If you do in fact have a foot resembling said football (or a brick) then that Tecnica might be a fine choice if it were the correct size. (BTW......yours probably were not) The boot selection of course is relevant to your foot shape and the knowledge/expertise of the fitter.

 

SJ
 

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darron Reynolds View Post

Boots are an issue i have been dealing with since i first starting skiing, granted that was 20 years ago.

My local shop suggested trying a womens boot... i just, well..

 

This is not as odd as you might think.  I know men who use the Dalbello Krypton Kryzma, the women's version of the Krypton Pro.  You're moving to CO where there are several excellent fitters.  Check the "Who's Who" on the Boot Guys forum for one near you.

post #9 of 9

 There are a lot of womans boots that are not white/pink/glitter.

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