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Beginner needs rental help!

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
First off let's me tell y'all this forum rocks! Most of all the information I needed I found on here . The advice given is awesome . I am very new to skiing. Only been 1 season and skied about 6 times. Loved it so much and hated the rental boots I got custom fitted boots and beds.

Should I continue to use the rentals skis given to me or upgrade to sport or demo skis so I can start advancing to the next level?

I ski mainly in Utah. Last season I used Rossi skis and Volkl skis. Rossi were a resorts skis and were awesome. Volkl game me problems but I did not have my boots. Don't know if it was skis or boots. This is where my lack of experience comes in. I takes lessons every trip if that helps

Any suggestions on skis and what to tell the rental guys would really help.
post #2 of 9
Thread Starter 

Beginner needs rental help!

First off let's me tell y'all this forum rocks! Most of all the information I needed I found on here . The advice given is awesome . I am very new to skiing. Only been 1 season and skied about 6 times. Loved it so much and hated the rental boots I got custom fitted boots and beds.

Should I continue to use the rentals skis given to me or upgrade to sport or demo skis so I can start advancing to the next level?

I ski mainly in Utah. Last season I used Rossi skis and Volkl skis. Rossi were a resorts skis and were awesome. Volkl game me problems but I did not have my boots. Don't know if it was skis or boots. This is where my lack of experience comes in. I takes lessons every trip if that helps

Any suggestions on skis and what to tell the rental guys would really help.
post #3 of 9

Assuming that you ski blue runs, the ski you want to avoid is the low price standard rental ski which regardless of what "brand" name is on the ski, they are low speed, low performance skis. Just get the guys at the performance rental shop to hook you up.

post #4 of 9

 Welcome Mike,

 As I see it the advantages to renting are-

  You can change skis for current conditions whenever you need to.

  You can change skis for the terrain available.

  No self maintenance (some people enjoy this tho).

  No additional maintenance costs (unless you abuse the rentals).

  No additional baggage cost on planes.

  More space in your car.

  You can try out diff length/width skis to find out what you like and narrow it down a bit when you do come to buy. (helpful if you can't demo).

  As you progress you can rent better skis without huge investment.

 Disadvantages-

   The skis may have been skied out and lost their pop.

    They might be in otherwise poor condition.

   Queueing in the shop when you could be out already.

   Not getting the continuity of using the same skis all the time and learning what they/you can do.

   When you add up what you've spent you might have been able to buy some in the sale or slightly used. (flexible seasonal rents seem to be the most cost effective route)

 

 I rented skis for four years while I had lots of lessons figuring I'd buy some once the learning curve slowed down. This was the right decision for me. You could be different as your getting at least double the time on the mountain in a season.

 

 When renting I used to avoid the shop when it was busy so I could pick the brains of the staff (we used to ski diff areas everytime so never knew what we were likely to need).

 

 Have fun, sounds like you have well and truly been bitten by the bug!

post #5 of 9

Welcome to EpicSki.  Without seeing you ski it's impossible to provide anything that resembles correct advice.  Just so you know, Volkls are known for being somewhat stiffer than other skis so that may have been part of your problem or it could be they had not been properly tuned or the rental boots.  You are to be congratulated for buying boots before buying skis, most beginners do it the other way around thinking the ski is the important thing.  You got it right.icon14.gif  You aren't really far enough along to benefit from demoing higher end skis at this point.  Demoing is really important when you can consistently link parallel turns on blue runs.  At this point I would recommend checking out season rentals at some local shops.  What you want is an arrangement where you can bring in the skis you're using and exchange them for a different pair as you progress, like longer or fatter or stiffer or even just a different brand.  This way you won't be spending money on beginner skis that you'll outgrow by the end of the season.  Work toward being able to link parallel turns by the end of the season and that is very doable.  Toward the end of the season try out some intermediate to advanced skis with a waist about 90mm, +/-4-5mm with an early rise tip.  If you find one you like, buy it.  This is a ski that will last you for several years and is something you can even use when you're ready to ski the double black chutes at Snowbird.eek.gif

 

Have fun and let us know how it all goes.  And don't forget we have the "Beginner Zone" where you can ask questions about skiing and technique.

post #6 of 9

Welcome to EpicSki!  Which is your favorite resort?  My favorite in the SLC area is Alta.  Wish I lived closer so I could ski there more than one week a season.  How far do you have to travel?

 

Good for you for investing in boots.  Since you are clearly in love with the sport, my guess is that you are going to progress pretty quickly.  In that case, renting makes more sense.  You can try different models and lengths.  You want to get at least the "performance" models that are better.  On a day that you are willing to rent on mountain and change skis every few runs, do a personal demo day.  Compare the skis on the same run.  You may be surprised how much you'll be able to tell what works better for you, even as a relative novice.

 

There are definitely differences between brands.  Many people who really like Rossi don't like Volkl and vice-versa.  In the end, it doesn't matter what others like.

 

Have you heard the expression "you marry boots but only date skis"?  Next spring could be a good time to pick up a pair of skis at a close out price.  Note that demo skis sometimes go on sale as early as Feb, right after Pres. Day weekend.

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks so much for the advice

I like all the places in slc but Alta and Briton have to be my fave.

The Volkl skis were. Volkl rtm74. The place where we rented from that's all they had, however they gave me the same skis and size and my buddy that skis blacks. He is 6'2 and I am only 5'6. This could have been part of the problem also. Since that was my first time ever on skis I didn't know any better. After I got the "bug" I started to gain some knowledge. 2nd time out was so much better . Going back in Jan

If 90mm waist is for intermediate or advanced then what realistically should I look for?

I was thinking about a 120/70/115

Thanks again everyone for the advice
post #8 of 9

 The waist relates more to the terrain the skier is wishing to ski rather than his level.

  Very fat waists for powder so the ski can float on it. They are very hard to turn on ice or hard snow as there is a lot of effort needed to move across the edges.

  Mid fat skis will get you all over the mountain in most conditions, they won't handle really deep powder as easily as the fatties and they won't be quite as quick to turn as carving skis but if your skiing 50% groomed/50% ungroomed then these skis are likely what your after.

 Something in the 90mm range will suit the type of skiing your doing now in the area you ski.

 Very narrow waists tend to be seen on icy groomed trails where the skier doesn't expect fresh snow as they are likely to sink.

 You don't see many novice skiers on very fat skis because they lack the knowledge/technique for powder snow and fatties are real hard work on groomers even for a good skier. 

post #9 of 9

Waist has nothing to do with ability or terrain and everything to do with the type of snow.  For where you ski 70 is too narrow.  Please re-read my other post.

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