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First time buyer/maintenance questions

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hey guys

After some assistance on here I bought my first set of skis/bindings/boots. I've been renting for 15 years now. I bought new rossi s3s for (what I think) was a great deal with marker griffon bindings. I have two questions. My bindings from the shop were set to 8 dim (190 lbs 5'11 intermediate to advanced) I've read it should be closer setc to 10. Second, what's the best way to keep my skis in good shape and should I wax them? I've read about elasticing brakes, storing one way up etc. Any help appreciated. (Skiing New England few moguls mostly main trails blacks and double)


Thanks
Dan
post #2 of 12

What makes you think that the ski shop that sold you skis and boots and mounted your bindings did not know how to set the proper DIN on your bindings? Are the settings different from what the rental skis of the past 15 years have been set at?

 

I usually wax my skis every 3 or 4 days others likely have a different frequency.

 

Elasticing brakes? I haven't got a clue what you are talking about and neither do you.

post #3 of 12

Oh Dano... we were all the proud owners of out first "new" skis once.  That said, Donny...-  15 years of renting?  You poor poor sob.

 

Keeping them in good shape?  Tuning and waxing is a good skill.  If you are moderatley handy and have a a workspace you are not afraid to get a dirty, it is easy to learn how to maintain your edges and bases.  Yes waxing every few skis days is a good idea.  Even a "Quick edge and wax" will significantly improve safety and performance. 

 

The #1 thing I would suggest for keeping them in good shape is .... Dry them off.  Keep a towel in the rig so you can carefully wipe down your skis after a day.  Keep some kind of stick or pen around to pry the snow out of nooks and crannies before drying and putting away.

 

As for DINS....Personal preference.  You are a fairly good sized guy, 8-9-10 is prob fine.  Remember -  you only have one set of knees.  I would rather have the binding release before my ACL.  Prelease and facepant?  Hey you don't need teeth to ski.  You DO need knees.  If you find yourself walking out of your bindings regularly, consider cranking down a bit.

 

Finally, if someone runs over your shiny new skis in the lift line, keep cool.  You ski on the bottoms.

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

Pat,

 

Thanks for your useful and clearly explained advice.  I was moving around a lot so it didn't make sense to me to buy but I'll be in New England for the foreseeable future.  Dano in regard too the brakes I'd read about using an elastic to hold them down, If that's just not a good idea or not normal then great, that's why I asked.  No need for the smug response.  

post #5 of 12

Dan,

 

Welcome to EpicSki!  What I've heard about storing skis is to keep them in a dry place, meaning not in a damp basement or garage.  Some people say that flat is best for summer storage, as in under a bed.  No need to strap the brakes during storage.

 

Waxing skis is easy to learn.  Don't need much stuff to get started.  There might be an article in the Gear section.  Of course, as you learn more there are plenty of items to add to the Wish List.  wink.gif

 

http://www.epicski.com/atype/2/Gear

 

My impression is that while they are similar, different bindings could be set up with slightly different DIN.  I'm sure people who are advanced/expert skiers make minor adjustments depending on the type of terrain.

 

Where are you are to ski the most this season?

post #6 of 12

Welcome Dony85,

 

Perhaps you had heard of using rubber bands (elastic) to hold the brakes up while tuning and waxing.  This is common - I use the thick purple rubber bands from fresh asparagus at the grocers. They work perfect, are free and last forever.  Homemade tuning stand/vice of lumber and inner tube clamped to a wall bench during the season.

 

Dry the skis off is good advice. I maintain five pair plus a snowboard, keep it simple.  All temperature wax at an interval your comfortable with, I use Hertel FC739 and wax every 5-7 full days of use. FKS Multituner with a black diamond stone insert along with a small Arkansas stone to knock off edge dings before using the diamond stone.

 

We store all of ours in the living space where they get heat to prevent rust, just lean them against the wall with a piece of thick carpet underneath the tails.

 

A lot of people really get into this, just depends on how you want to spend your time.  Some people I ski patrol with never touch their skis and it doesn't seem to affect their skiing or their enjoyment.  You will find your comfort spot.

post #7 of 12

The DIN chart is here:http://www.dinsetting.com/dinchart.htm or you can use the calculator here: http://www.dinsetting.com/dinchart.htm

 

8 sounds about right.  If 8 won't hold you in, then seek some lessons to improve your technique rather than just cranking them up. 

 

 

There are legit reasons to go with high DIN settings, such as racing at > 60mph or skiing terrain where a pre-release will lead to a rag-doll flop over the cliff.  If neither of these apply to you, there's no reason to go above what's on the DIN chart.  Yeah, there are some macho knuckleheads who think they need DIN that goes to eleven, but usually what's going on is that they can't ski very well and are coming out of their bindings due to poor technique.

 

Good advice about drying them off and storing them in a dry location.  Waxing/tuning can be done at your schedule - once a season suffices for many people (and you won't hurt the skis by this), but if you like better performance once every 5 to 7 days of use should keep them in shape.  My home hill charges $5 for a hot wax and $15 for a wax and tune, so i just do that every 7 days or so.  You can buy the waxing/tuning supplies and tools and do it yourself of course.  My experience is that i can't get my edges as sharp as the Wintersteiger does with my hand tuner.  YMMV.

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dony85 View Post

Pat,

 

Thanks for your useful and clearly explained advice.  I was moving around a lot so it didn't make sense to me to buy but I'll be in New England for the foreseeable future.  Dano in regard too the brakes I'd read about using an elastic to hold them down, If that's just not a good idea or not normal then great, that's why I asked.  No need for the smug response.  

I apologize for my flippant remark but your elastic brakes threw me off. Do some searching on this site and you will find endless advice on ski tuning.

 

My advice is to take your skis to a shop to get waxed and then ask them if you can watch them wax some skis so you can learn for yourself and they probably will be more than happy to also sell you some wax and other tuning equipment. Or you could just find some Youtube demonstration.

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dony85 View Post

Hey guys
After some assistance on here I bought my first set of skis/bindings/boots. I've been renting for 15 years now. I bought new rossi s3s for (what I think) was a great deal with marker griffon bindings. I have two questions. My bindings from the shop were set to 8 dim (190 lbs 5'11 intermediate to advanced) I've read it should be closer setc to 10. Second, what's the best way to keep my skis in good shape and should I wax them? I've read about elasticing brakes, storing one way up etc. Any help appreciated. (Skiing New England few moguls mostly main trails blacks and double)
Thanks
Dan

 

First, WELCOME TO EPIC !

 

Congratulations on your new skis.   At 190 Intmed to advanced a DIN of 8  sounds about right depending on your age.  I am 5'10 191 and us a DIN of 8.  Instead of relying on a chart and others for the proper setting do the release check yourself.

 

Self Release Check.  Use your dominant leg.  Put your ski on the carpet, put your boot on as if you were going skiing.  Get in one ski.  Have a partner/friend/wife etc. step down on the tail - holding the tail on the carpet.  Bend/flex your knee, lunge forward with force.  Heel should release forward and upward with medium resistance. It shouldn't be too easy or too hard to eject.      Next have your other person step on the front of the ski and flex your knee and twist sideways out of the toe piece. This will take a little harder twisting/pressure (not a quick movement).  If you can't release have your helprd tap gently on the boot with his/her fist and you should come out.

 

VERY IMPORTANT.  Do this check with a flexed leg/knee or you could hurt yourself.

 

This is a good way to -dry land- release check your bindings.  Remember if you move your DIN (release point) do it gently, i.e., only move the DIN  1/2 number at a time and then do the above to check the release tension etc.

 

Storing with brakes up - NO.  Storing.  Cool dry place. I store mine vertically but not with the skis stuck together which may have a tendency to take the camber out of them and if you stored them this way i.e., all summer you might take all the camber out of them.  Skis should be dried after use or you will end up with rusty edges.

You can learn to care, wax, lube etc. your skis by yourself as referenced already.

 

 

 

IMG_0104.JPG

 

Note their is a gap between the ski bases.   Welcome to Epic, have a great winter and enjoy your new skis, if you ever get out west let a Bear know and we'd be glad to show you some great skiing, Moosedrool beer and great people.

post #10 of 12

Pete, I'm pretty sure that for the binding self release test you are NOT supposed to have someone else stand on the ski. Anyone?

post #11 of 12

well, you're supposed to do it on the snow or carpet where you can edge the ski in.  so someone else stabilizing the ski is fine.


Basically, the concept is find the point where your muscles and body themselves can cause a release under their own power.  Therefore if you have that set, then all release will occur before you hit the limits of your own muscular range and will be "safer".  

 

So

If you can twist your knee with 30 ft-lbs of torque in either way,  then if the binding is set to release at about 30, you're not putting yourself at risk to torques beyond what you can do naturally.

 

If you can only twist your knee with 30 toque, but the binding doesn't release until 35, then potentially you can subject your knee to those unnatural torques up to 35 when you oopsie.

post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

Pete, I'm pretty sure that for the binding self release test you are NOT supposed to have someone else stand on the ski. Anyone?

Nope, have to stabilize back of  ski for forward / heel release so someone standing on the tail is fine.  Toe release yes you could just put the ski on edge and twist out but wife likes our carpet so I just have her stand on the front.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

well, you're supposed to do it on the snow or carpet where you can edge the ski in.  so someone else stabilizing the ski is fine.


Basically, the concept is find the point where your muscles and body themselves can cause a release under their own power.  Therefore if you have that set, then all release will occur before you hit the limits of your own muscular range and will be "safer".  

 

So

If you can twist your knee with 30 ft-lbs of torque in either way,  then if the binding is set to release at about 30, you're not putting yourself at risk to torques beyond what you can do naturally.

 

If you can only twist your knee with 30 toque, but the binding doesn't release until 35, then potentially you can subject your knee to those unnatural torques up to 35 when you oopsie.

 30lbs of torque etc. in other words what DIN is the binding set.   So start at a DIN of 8 (where the shop set them) and see if it works for you.  Don't get too technical KISS will work fine for a new ski owner.  Try it - it works.

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