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Utah Vs Colorado - Page 13

Poll Results: Utah Vs Colorado?

 
  • 40% (70)
    Colorado
  • 59% (101)
    Utah
171 Total Votes  
post #361 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post

And while on that topic, few areas in Colorado have the terrain quality that Alta/Snowbird do, and since the areas that do get half as much snow, it takes a long time for said terrain get covered and skiable.  Most of the CO areas with good steeps are in remote locations and close early too.

Tony, I bet you haven't skied Breck since Inperial and Peak 6 opened.

Mike
post #362 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
 

Not to be too snarky, but every time I see another post complaining about the people/powder ratio I think about why people who are so powder oriented do not get into backcountry skiing.  It snows on a million mountains and the 95% of powder hounds who do not backcountry ski always complain about the lack of fresh powder on the handful that have lifts on them.  You can ski untracked snow every day right next to almost every ski area in the Rocky Mountains, you just need to invest about a fraction of the price of your last ski vacation in the right equipment and spend some time learning how to use it.

 

Forget Alta/Snowbird, you can check the Wasatch Stoke thread on TGR or the instagram pics people post daily on wasatchsnowforecast.com and see people skiing mountains of powder all to themselves, and many of those trips started from the Alta parking lot.  If powder really is your priority you just need to make a move to control your ratio.  Admittedly, it is not easy to get started, but if powder is your priority it is definitely worth the effort.

 

Risk. Risk is the reason. A lot of stuff I ski inbounds I wouldn't touch EVER on the other side of the rope.  But, I can hit that stuff inbounds most powder days of the year and know if I keep my wits, I have a miniscule, almost non-existent chance of dying in a slide (and yes, I wear a beacon inbounds, but that is another subject).

 

Plus, as you know from your time in my neck of the woods, powder competition just isn't that fierce. My legs are also good for about 10x more laps when there is a lift pulling me at least most of the way up. Silverton and of course Wolf are really easy places to find lift served goods days after storms- which tends to keep me inbounds.

post #363 of 377
Quote:
Tony, I bet you haven't skied Breck since Inperial and Peak 6 opened.

I skied Imperial/Whale's Tail several times during the 2011 Gathering.  That is my kind of terrain but AltaBird, Jackson, Whistler/Blackcomb, even Mammoth have far more of it. 

post #364 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post

I skied Imperial/Whale's Tail several times during the 2011 Gathering.  That is my kind of terrain but AltaBird, Jackson, Whistler/Blackcomb, even Mammoth have far more of it. 

And Peak 6 is as big a change as Imperial was. Still not a JH//Altabird, but it is no slouch either. And when you take the combination of E chair, Horseshoe/Contest bowls, Lake Chutes, Whales Tail, Upper Peak 7, and Peak 6, it's not far from it.

Mike
post #365 of 377

Since we're on the topic, is there any possibility that all the snow that's falling on Alta/Bird right now (according to Snowbird's website they've gotten 42 inches in 48 hours) won't be completely gone/ packed to ice/ back to crust by the weekend? I don't care if it's not powder, but is there really any reason to make the drive? (about 4 hrs one way) I mean 4 ft can't really be destroyed in 3 days can it?

post #366 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by WalterdogEllis View Post
 

Since we're on the topic, is there any possibility that all the snow that's falling on Alta/Bird right now (according to Snowbird's website they've gotten 42 inches in 48 hours) won't be completely gone/ packed to ice/ back to crust by the weekend? I don't care if it's not powder, but is there really any reason to make the drive? (about 4 hrs one way) I mean 4 ft can't really be destroyed in 3 days can it?

 

There will still be good skiing to be had.

post #367 of 377
Quote:
I mean 4 ft can't really be destroyed in 3 days can it?

It won't melt out, but surfaces may be quite difficult.  Snow that is churned up on powder days and then starts baking in spring sun can easily take 5-7 days before it consolidates into a smooth corn surface.  During that interim period it's best to be skiing skier-packed snow.

 

Anyone in Colorado should be driving east to the new snow rather west to the old snow starting tomorrow.

post #368 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post


Tony, I bet you haven't skied Breck since Inperial and Peak 6 opened.

Mike

Ok but how long does it take to do repeated laps on Peak 6. In Jackson or Snowbird there is terrain comparable right under the chair. 

post #369 of 377

The snowpack is more often stronger and deeper in Utah. The lift served terrain at the resorts in the Cottonwood Canyons is by far better than most ski area terrain in Colorado. It's Utah tho and it's weird. It's ridiculously crowded and the smog is gross. It's far from what I would call the ideal mountain town/skier experience. But that's just me. I love visiting and skiing there but that's as far as it goes. 

 

Colorado is famous for it's super sensitive and dangerous continental snowpack. This is one of the reasons for having mostly groomed cut ski run slopes, the other is the target market. This is why the numbers of skier visitors dwarfs Utah's. There are exceptions of course. If you have been to Crested Butte, Telluride, Silverton, or A-Basin when they are 100% open there is a lot of very challenging terrain. The thing about Colorado though that is really cool is all of the mountain towns that feel like safety bubbles way out in the mountains away from the urban sprawls. The other really awesome thing is that the mountains are everywhere and a lot of them are pretty easily accessible for back country touring. The ski touring in Utah feels like I'm still in the city fighting for fresh tracks. I hate that. 

 

So ya, I like skiing in Utah but overall I think Colorado is way cooler. I'm not a huge fan of that I-70 corridor but that's just a fraction of what's available. The bc is pretty good in Summit County tho. 

post #370 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by raisingarizona View Post  The lift served terrain at the resorts in the Cottonwood Canyons is by far better than most ski area terrain in Colorado.

 

It's far better than most ski area terrain in Utah too.

post #371 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by raisingarizona View Post
 

Ok but how long does it take to do repeated laps on Peak 6. In Jackson or Snowbird there is terrain comparable right under the chair. 


It's about a 10-15 minute hike.  Seems like it is a longer hike, but a recent timing, at a quite modest pace, as 10 minutes.  The hike does cut down on traffic.

 

No doubt Altabird has great terrain and more snow.  It takes more snow to cover the rocks.

 

My point wasn't that the terrain in the Cottonwoods wasn't better, just that Tony wasn't taking into account the terrain available at Breckenridge that puts world class skiing within a short drive from Denver (like all things, traffic willing).  And it's not defined by the hike-to terrain of Peak 6, 7, and 8.  Adding in E chair, the T-bar, and even the hike to off of 9 gets a lot of both hike-to and lift-served terrain that begins to approach  the realm of JH and the Cottonwoods.

 

Mike

post #372 of 377

pot is legal in CO

post #373 of 377
I like them both. For me, key differentiators are Utah skis areas offer convenience that comes with being in/very near large cities while CO areas off I-70 offers more size--verticals, widths and lengths.

Having said that, I'd pick JH on uncrowned days for my next road trip personally, and also Mammoth stacks up quite nicely with Utah/CO resorts.
post #374 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by nochaser View Post

I like them both. For me, key differentiators are Utah skis areas offer convenience that comes with being in/very near large cities while CO areas off I-70 offers more size--verticals, widths and lengths.

Having said that, I'd pick JH on uncrowned days for my next road trip personally, and also Mammoth stacks up quite nicely with Utah/CO resorts.


Have skied a lot more around SLC than in CO.  Clearly plenty of skiing of all types to be had in both places.  For me, one reason I prefer UT to CO is the altitude difference coming from the flatlands.  I can adjust in a day or two when flying into SLC and skiing at areas with a base of about 8000 ft.  Takes 4-5 days when the base is at 10,000.  That's when I'm sleeping lower down, say 4500-6500 ft.

 

For a quick trip with some time flexibility, flying Southwest in/out of SLC is simpler than dealing with DIA.  Also, less likely to have weather issues at the airport.

post #375 of 377
Yeah, also Utah seems to have less of resort pricing than CO. If I optimized my residence for skiing, I'd pick Utah in a heartbeat.

If comparing purely skiing only, I feel like CO has a bit more to offer.
post #376 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 


Have skied a lot more around SLC than in CO.  Clearly plenty of skiing of all types to be had in both places.  For me, one reason I prefer UT to CO is the altitude difference coming from the flatlands.  I can adjust in a day or two when flying into SLC and skiing at areas with a base of about 8000 ft.  Takes 4-5 days when the base is at 10,000.  That's when I'm sleeping lower down, say 4500-6500 ft.

 

For a quick trip with some time flexibility, flying Southwest in/out of SLC is simpler than dealing with DIA.  Also, less likely to have weather issues at the airport.

 

That altitude difference is huge when it comes to snow quality and preservation. It is why (excepting Wolf Creek) Colorado snowfall is less dense, and it helps keep winter conditions on the mountain deep into Spring.

post #377 of 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by nochaser View Post

Yeah, also Utah seems to have less of resort pricing than CO.

 

I definitely agree with this.  I took two trips to Utah and Colorado back-to-back this season and the day lift passes in Utah were about 60% of what I was paying for lift tickets in Colorado.  I also went to Jackson Hole (priced like Colorado) and Grand Targhee (priced like Utah).

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