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Compromised Sidewall - Bent Edge

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Started tuning a pair of skis and discovered there's some sidewall/edge damage...

 

1000

Click for larger image

 

The edge is pushed down by the compromised sidewall as shown a few inches behind the heel of the binding, but does not appear damaged otherwise. Same with the base, although it does protrude a bit at that point. Not sure how it got that way, but it appears be a bend/stress thing, not direct rock/etc hit that might have broken or seriously dinged the edge and resulted in a deep base gouge.

 

Anyway, wondering if there's any way to try and bring that edge back in line? I have not tried taking a hammer to it - not sure if that would be a bad idea, or have a lasting impact anyway.

 

If not, short of bagging it just put it on the outside/make this the left ski?

 

Feedback appreciated.

post #2 of 19

sidewall appears to be cracked. the ski will absorb water there. it will gradually fail, IMO.

post #3 of 19

Is that a gap along the edge and sidewall?  I'd probably squirt some superglue in there (looks too thin of a gap for 2 part epoxy) and clamp it for a couple hours.. then try skiing and see what happens.  However, it really does appear to be cracked on the side from topsheet to p-tex.  Not looking good there.  It actually looks like the ski was dropped in it's side in transit somehow, airline damage?

 

post #4 of 19

roflmao.gifroflmao.gifroflmao.gifroflmao.gif

post #5 of 19

How much do you love these skis?  To me they look like they may be candidates for rock skis, assuming you avoid moguls, air, crud, backseat, etc.  The problem, of course, is that you have no idea how far into the ski that crack goes.  If I were to salvage them, I'd do as you say and make it a left ski.  I'd glue the crack as much as possible.  Rather than bending or banging the metal back, I'd just file it to straight.  Good luck.

post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 

LF, glad to have brought some merriment to your day.

 

The rest of you gents, appreciate your comments. I'll try to file/sand that area down a little more and then seal it with glue or epoxy if I can get it in there, and then when I have the chance will take em out and see what happens on some easy runs. If nothing else it'll be an interesting experiment.

 

Cheers.

post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

Started tuning a pair of skis and discovered there's some sidewall/edge damage...

 

1000

Click for larger image

 

The edge is pushed down by the compromised sidewall as shown a few inches behind the heel of the binding, but does not appear damaged otherwise. Same with the base, although it does protrude a bit at that point. Not sure how it got that way, but it appears be a bend/stress thing, not direct rock/etc hit that might have broken or seriously dinged the edge and resulted in a deep base gouge.

 

Anyway, wondering if there's any way to try and bring that edge back in line? I have not tried taking a hammer to it - not sure if that would be a bad idea, or have a lasting impact anyway.

 

If not, short of bagging it just put it on the outside/make this the left ski?

 

Feedback appreciated.

  I've seen something that looks very similar to this quite a few times before. Sometimes as a recreation/race skier when you run over something (as you obviously have) , small particles of it  (in my case, break-aways or stubbys, in your case ....?) can force their way in between the top of the edge and the sidewall causing a gap to occur. What I did as a fix was to ...

 

 

  1: open the "gap" even further (slightly) with a small, flat tool (mini screwdriver), and leave it there for now...

  2:using an even smaller tool (razor blade...?something THIN) "fish out"/dig out the foreign material wedged in the ski--get as much out as you can. DON'T cut yourself, (and don't sue me if you dowink.gif)  use gloves!!         

  3:with the small screwdriver still in place, heat the area with a heat gun (not too hot, but get it quite warm) and then drizzle/work in some 2 part epoxy or industrial strength super glue (with the razor blade maybe, gently) until the gap is slightly over filled. Heat it again so the glue drains in...add more as needed.

  4:once you're sure you're good, remove the small screwdriver, clamp the affected area (clean off excess glue from sidewall) and allow to dry for 24 hrs.

 

 

  p.s. I performed the same procedure above on a pair of SL's I had (ran over a pole training) and it worked pretty good...even raced 'em a few times afterwardssmile.gif

   p.p.s.s  I would NOT us a hammer...

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 

Just getting ready to play with this a bit, so timing is good. Sounds like a very sensible plan - I'll give it a shot.

 

Many thanks, zentune!

post #9 of 19

I think it's fixable without any problems down the road as long as it's sealed and can't absorb any moisture.  Just check out this edge from a few years ago, fixed and still skis perfectly fine.

 

1000

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

Just getting ready to play with this a bit, so timing is good. Sounds like a very sensible plan - I'll give it a shot.

 

Many thanks, zentune!

  No problemo!! Let me know how it turns out...

post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

I think it's fixable without any problems down the road as long as it's sealed and can't absorb any moisture.  Just check out this edge from a few years ago, fixed and still skis perfectly fine.

 

1000

 

Now that's encouraging!  ;-)

 

Small amount of crud cleared out, epoxy setting up. Thx again, all, for weighing in!

post #12 of 19

icon14.gif  I'd absolutely try to glue it/seal it up and ski it.  But, I'd also be shopping around for a replacement if it was a core (no pun intended) element of my quiver.  Worst case scenario is that you've got a pair of R/L specific rock skis.

post #13 of 19

not that it's relevant to repair, but one way that happens is you fall, the tail gets jammed into firm snow all the way to the binding, and then your weight carries through and bends hell out of it with the snow as a fulcrum, your body as the lever.

 

good luck on the fix. it is possible that if you could X-ray the ski at that point, there would be damage throughout the ski, core, fiberglass, everything. your ski looks bent to me, whereas the Atomic looks crushed.

post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 

Come to think of it, I do have a visit to the dentist coming up. Wonder if I could cajole him into letting me bring that ski in for a deeper look? Ha!  ;-)

 

These aren't my go-to's, just something I picked up cheap and would like to experience on the snow, see how they feel. Cleaning/tuning them up and trying to repair is a good excuse to hang out in the garage and dream about skiing while I ogle and fondle the gear, so regardless of the outcome it's all good. Continuing education. In any event it's in the hands of the marine epoxy gods now...

 

1000

 

I'm hoping she's not dead, Jim, but as with all things, time will tell. 


Edited by jc-ski - 11/15/12 at 10:30am
post #15 of 19

Two words: clamping cauls

 

Two more words: waxed paper

post #16 of 19

^^^OCD..  The epoxy won't stick to the p-tex or metal edge.  Not enough of it would squirt out to run up to worry about sticking the topsheet to the top of the clamp.  But, agree it is a good habit to always use something like that when gluing stuff.

post #17 of 19
Great thread. Excellent advice. I love to see people fixing things.
The heat gun trick to thin out epoxy is a key to quality repairs.
You might love these skis and get years of excellent service from them. Or they could break soon.
They are certainly worthless if the fear of more damage keeps them off the snow.
Eric
post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 

Well, my "heat gun" was a hair dryer, but it seemed to work well enough. ;-)

 

Yes, lots of great advice here. I was able to open things up and clean out the area with a couple of thin Swiss army knife blades, (there did seem to be a small amount of crud in there), and used a paper clip to get some marine epoxy down in there. Just as advised the heat encouraged it to settle in. Repeated that a few times, backed my spreaders out and wiped off the excess, and clamped it. I can see how cauls and wax paper could be useful, but I was able to get it done without mucking up the clamp pads, and 24 hours later everything seems to have set up nicely. Just need to finish up with a little more tuning and a good wax job and they'll be ready for some snow time!

 

Cheers.

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

Well, my "heat gun" was a hair dryer, but it seemed to work well enough. ;-)

 

Yes, lots of great advice here. I was able to open things up and clean out the area with a couple of thin Swiss army knife blades, (there did seem to be a small amount of crud in there), and used a paper clip to get some marine epoxy down in there. Just as advised the heat encouraged it to settle in. Repeated that a few times, backed my spreaders out and wiped off the excess, and clamped it. I can see how cauls and wax paper could be useful, but I was able to get it done without mucking up the clamp pads, and 24 hours later everything seems to have set up nicely. Just need to finish up with a little more tuning and a good wax job and they'll be ready for some snow time!

 

Cheers.

  Sweet!! Glad it turned out good. Might last quite some time (mine did) wink.gif

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