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Carving Ski or Big Mountain/Powder Ski?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Current Skis: Kastle MX 88, Volkl Mantra 96 (No Rocker Tip)

Bio: I am 6 feet, 210 pounds, ski 50 days a year (Tahoe), 50 years old

Type: I am an aggressive expert skier, I love going on or off piste

Past Skis: Volkl AC 50, Volkl Superspeed

 

 

I enjoy my current skis, but they are neither great carving skis or powder skis. One part of me says go for a narrower carving ski because I will get a lot of use on it, the other part of me says go for a powder ski which I have never

had. Some of the skis I would like to try:

 

Carving

Rossignol Pursuit (81 width_

Nordica Firearrow (84 width)

Head Rev ( 80 or 85)

Volkl V Werks (85)

Kastke MX (78)

 

Big Mountain/Powder

Kastle BMX 108

Volkl Katana 112

DPs Wailer 112

Volkl Shiro 119

H20 Kodiak 120

Ski Logic Ullr 101

Dynastar Cham 107

 

So should I get a Carver or Big Mountain ski?  Top two or three skis I should demo?

 

Thanks

 

Steve

post #2 of 9

My vote is for the Pow ski.  

 

I can't see why you would want one of the "carving" skis which you have listed.  They are all only a bit narrower that what you already have in the MX88 and won't carve significantly better than the Kastle.

 

Others will no doubt chime in on which big ski to try, but I'd eliminate the Ullr from your list right away as it's too similar to your Mantra in width.  I'd say go at least 110 in width and use them as your new snow ski, since you have the no new snow ski covered with the MX88 and Mantra.

 

Mike

post #3 of 9

Which style do you prefer?  It appears you may not be familiar with the smear/surf technique that modern big mountain rippers excel at.

 

If your offpiste excursions involve old school in the snow not on the snow mentality, you may be better off with the carvers.   OTOH, if you think the newschool techniques sound fun, demo the new stuff.

 

Look at it this way, if you spend retail, go for the new wave big fatties, there are a lot of carvers on the market that their owners want to sell to make room for their own fatties.  Looking at skis for sale, the carvers are at a substantial discount compared to the big rippers.

post #4 of 9

What would you rather crush, groomers or pow?

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

I have never skied a new powder ski so I am thinking of demoing a couple of those. I probably do not gain much by going for a carving ski since I have a Kastle MX 88. I think I need to demo a few of the fatter skis. I think I would like to try a powder ski with some camber and a rocker. Any recommendations in the 105-110 width?

 

Thanks, Steve

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunValleySteve View Post

I have never skied a new powder ski so I am thinking of demoing a couple of those. I probably do not gain much by going for a carving ski since I have a Kastle MX 88. I think I need to demo a few of the fatter skis. I think I would like to try a powder ski with some camber and a rocker. Any recommendations in the 105-110 width?

 

Thanks, Steve

Is your screen name indicative of where you mostly ski?  

 

If it is, is there a good reason to BUY a big powder ski when you probably don't get that many big powder days.  I think you might be able to demo on big days for an entire season, try several different powder skis, and still not end up spending even a third of what you might pay for a new pair right now.

 

It's just personal preference, but I pay a lot more attention to having carving skis that I like than to powder skis. I like that Rossi Pursuit HP that you mentioned, but I have a relationship with Rossignol and I'm not very objective.

 

Good luck with the search.

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

My screen name is SunValley not because I live there but because it is my favorite place to ski.

I ski in Tahoe, and take about 3 trips out of state a year. No question Sun Valley is not a powder

mecca like Snowbird/Alta which I also visit every year.

 

I love reading ski reviews, and I am jealous of all the people that can test skis. I am in no hurry to buy

skis , but I would like to demo them. The big problem is the expense, and hassle of demoing.

 

One powder ski that has my attention is the H20 Kodiak ski by Dean Cummings. I see there is a couple dealers in the

Tahoe area. It got ski of the year in the powder catagory by expertskier.com.

 

Steve

post #8 of 9

If you want a no compromise carving ski, I'd recommend a slalom ski with a waist in the high 60s to mid 70s. I have skis from 65 to 94 width and there is a clear relationship between a  ski's narrowness and it's pure carving ability. To me the advantage of a quiver is that you can have skis that offer different capabilities without compromises . Only you can say what type of ski you prefer but skiing in the east, I used my slalom skis something like 10x as often as my Kastle FX 94s last winter as I was on groomed hard pack virtually all year. We had no real snow in PA so there was no off piste and in fact by the end of the year in VT and Maine, the piste was about 50% as wide as usual.

post #9 of 9

I think it depends on how much you get to ski powder.  A few days a year? it's probably best just to rent for those days.  If you really like carving, there's no question you want a race ski.  The type of hold and power you get from a race skis is unmatched by anything else.  However...it's pretty much a bust on anything other than groomed runs. 

 

An 80-90 waist ski can be pretty good all around in almost anything.  I ride some Sultan 85's which have pretty good carving ability and does fairly well in almost any condition...even deep powder. 

100+ really only shines when there's deep fresh snow.  Groomers are no fun at all on fatties.

 

Are you limited to one pair of skis?  You seem to ski plenty...so why not have it all?  Get a pair of race skis, a pair of everyday all mtn's and a pair of powder skis.  If you don't ski pow that much, then drop that ski and rent for the days you would use it.  The nice part about that is you can keep trying different skis which is always fun.  If you do still want to own powder skis and can only have 2 pairs, then drop the race skis.  If only one pair..then choice is obvious..get the one that can do everything.

 

Now if you really like carving and can afford more skis...I'm going to go further and recommend a pair of GS race skis and SL race skis.  These will give you completely different experiences when it comes to carving on groomers....and it's all awesome.  =D

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