New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Hello Everybody!

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hello everybody,

 
I've been skiing pretty much since when I learned to walk, but only for 4-7 days a year on average. Unfortunately living in Texas tends to limit skiing opportunities. 
I have always rented skis and boots, but now I'm ready to purchase my own equipment.
 
I have some of the basic questions that a lot of people do so I'm sorry for my ignorance. Any and all help/advice is appreciated!
 
The main decision I'm trying to make is whether to buy gear online/in TX or wait until I get up to Taos. It would be nice to be able to buy boots and skis on the mountain so that I can test them out (also I feel like I would be dealing with more knowledgeable employees), but the savings from buying online/older model years in TX are appealing.
 
Thoughts?
 
I went ahead and answered the questions that I saw posted. 
  1. Where in the world are you skiing? 

    Primarily Taos, NM but also around Colorado
  2. What kinds of terrain do you prefer 

    My favorite runs are steep blues, flying down the mountain, carving turns. Nothing better
    I enjoy mogul runs as well, but that is definitely where I need to improve as a skiier.
  3. How many days a year do you ski?

    Usually around 5, this year between 10 and 20
  4. How advanced are you as a skier?

    I consider myself a very good Texas skier if that makes any sense. Very confident and aggressive in most terrain.
    I still pick and choose my way down blacks and the occasional double black, but anything without moguls I can handle in my sleep with good form, control, etc.
  5. What's your height and weight? 

          6 ft tall and currently at 210 lbs (usually around 190 though)
 
 
 
Again, any advice is greatly appreciated!
post #2 of 9
Thread Starter 

Some other information I probably should have included:

 

I'm a 21 year old male.

 

I have usually rented skis at around 180-185 cm

Model and brand have depended on year usually K2 or Salomon 

 

 

What do you think about this length for my height/weight as well as experience level. Whenever I go into rental shops they try and put me on 170's or sometimes even shorter!

 

I have had people tell me that I don't enjoy moguls as much because I need to practice on shorter skis then move to longer skis. Is this the case? I really enjoy longer skis 90% of the time because I feel like they help with speed and ice(when it's a problem).

post #3 of 9

 Hello and welcome, your questions are not stupid at all, I'm sure most of us have had similar thoughts at some point in our skiing careers!

 I live in SE England so I know exactly what you mean by good texan skier! I have a long journey to the slopes also.

 To be completely honest I think you have answered your own question! I would wait and demo at Taos, working with a knowledgable bootfitter is vital and like you rightly say, testing and tweaking on site is preferable.

 Check out the bootfitting wikis at the top of the page in the boot guy forum. There is a useful guide to reputable people in many areas that people on here trust.

 If you really want to master moguls then I strongly suggest lessons, if neccessary renting for another year, that way you can get the lessons you'd need and demo some skis in diff lengths.(it is easier to then get a ski you like cheaply in the off season sales) FWIW I like to ski a little shorter precisely so I can do nippy little turns on changing terrain.

 Boots are far more important than skis IMHO so getting these sorted first is a good move on your part. After all, a great skier can make any plank work for him but the greatest skier in the world will struggle with ill fitting boots and not enjoy themselves in the slightest.

 Enjoy your season!

post #4 of 9

Since you go to Taos, the best way to learn quickly would be to make good use of the great ski school there.  If you can go early season, group lessons can end up private lessons.  They also have a Ski Week program that is quite a deal if you can get away that long.  Not only would moguls become more fun, it would probably open up even more difficult areas to you . . . with a ski buddy of course.  It's fair to say that if you find doing something hard, some lessons to improve technique is the better investment, not different skis.  By the way, I'm not an instructor.  I'm an older skier who is having a lot more fun in recent years because of time spent with good instructors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FortWorthAggie View Post

What do you think about this length for my height/weight as well as experience level. Whenever I go into rental shops they try and put me on 170's or sometimes even shorter!

 

I have had people tell me that I don't enjoy moguls as much because I need to practice on shorter skis then move to longer skis. Is this the case? I really enjoy longer skis 90% of the time because I feel like they help with speed and ice(when it's a problem).

post #5 of 9

Welcome to Epic.  Let me throw out some advice about boots.  DO NOT BUY BOOTS ONLINE.  Get that?  Buying skis online is one thing because you don't wear skis.  You wear boots so they must be tried on to get the right size.  Knowing your shoe size doesn't help.  If you walk into a shop and the sales person asks you your shoe size, then goes in the back and brings out a pair of boots and says "try these on," the best thing you can do is leave because they don't know what they're doing.  Boots that are the right size will feel quite tight because the liner will start to pack out almost immediately.  So if you start with a boot that fits like your shoes, within a few days you feet will be flopping around inside.  Tightening the buckles to compensate will lead to cold and painful feet.  Get boots that fit and your skiing will improve.  I highly recommend you buy boots in Taos so if modifications need to be done to the shell they can be done quickly and you'll know right away if it was enough.  

post #6 of 9

DEMO

post #7 of 9

Another option is that you could demo skis at Taos and buy back in DFW; it might be less expensive thattaway. 

I lived in the Dallas area for 27 years before escaping over a year ago, so I'll give a little advice about buying there if you decide to do that.

For boots especially, St. Bernard Sports in the Lovers & Inwood Shopping Center is probably your best best.  They are a member of America's Best Bootfitters & have a rep for strong customer service, which is probably a must for them given that much of their clientele comes from the Park Cities right next door. 

 

A place I liked better, though, and where I got most of my stuff was The Warming Hut on Southbound Central just north of Beltline.  They would be my 1st choice.

 

Another place just opened in Grapevine right before I moved called CD Ski & Sports.  I bought some winter hiking boots and got a ski tune there, and they seemed like they knew what they were doing, but I never talked to them about skis or ski boots, so I can't speak to that aspect of their op.  If you're in Ft. Worth, they would be only 1/2 as far away as the other 2, though.

 

Good Luck.

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thank y'all for the advice and welcomes!

 

I think I will most likely hold off on buying skis and boots until during or after my trip to Taos. I just don't think I would be confident making that big of an investment without trying them out on the mountain first.

 

My Dad purchased a new pair of boots from the Boot Doctors up in Taos a few years ago and has loved them. 

Then once I find the skis I like, I can figure out the cheapest way of buying them. Correct me if I'm wrong but don't some stores let you apply part of your demo fees towards your final ski purchase?

 

I agree the taos ski school is great. I've been meaning to take a few more lessons, but never seem to get around to it. Hopefully I'll change that this year.

 

 

Skierish: I've purchased some gear from a few of those stores over the years as well. I've never had any problems, but it has always been just pants, gloves, goggles etc, never skis or boots. 

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by FortWorthAggie View Post

Correct me if I'm wrong but don't some stores let you apply part of your demo fees towards your final ski purchase?

 

Most do, yeah.  Be sure to ask.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion