EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Washing/waterproofing ski jackets/pants.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Washing/waterproofing ski jackets/pants. - Page 2

post #31 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Hall View Post

From what I have learned over the last week, Tech wash is used for cleaning waterproof/resistant clothing that is otherwise in good shape. TX-Direct adds/replenishes the waterproof/resistant coating if/when it has worn away.

 

Hope that's right or I have wasted some money :)

 

 

That's correct.  It worth noting that for everything (including the stuff you didn't use the TX-direct on), the most important step is the drier.  The heat of the drier will rejuvenate the original coating on the fabric to some extent.  If the coating is still in good shape but just fouled by dirt/oils, a simple wash in tech wash and a run through the drier will give it some more life.  I will say that in my experience, the after market spray on/wash in stuff works, but it doesn't last anywhere near as long as the original factory coating.  So once you're at the point where you feel a need to use one of those products, you should anticipate using it often.

post #32 of 36

I hate to bump an old thread, but this seemed like the place for the question.

 

I have some fairly new ski pants that I got really sweaty in the last time I went out (it was a lot warmer than expected) and they kind of stink.  I ordered the Nikwax Tek Wash and Wash-in and was surprised to see that you're supposed to use the entire bottle of Wash-in every time you use it.  That could add up in $$ pretty quickly.  Is it necessary to use the Wash-in after using the Tek Wash even on a new pair of pants (that is, will the Tek Wash kill the water proofing if it hasn't worn off through time) or will just the Tek Wash (and no waterproofing cycle) be fine?

post #33 of 36

Read on the nikwax site.  

 

First be clear that your clothes still should have a waterproof layer.  That's the goretex, or goretex waterproof-breathable equivalent which is a layer under the outside fabric.  What these products do is only for the very outside layer of fabric when it is no longer water-shedding (the dwr layer).

 

Techwash won't not ruin the waterproofing nor the DWR layer.  It just cleans away oil and grime that causes water to lose surface tension and soak into the fabric easier rather than bead up.  Perhaps though, any wash cycle does induce some wear and tear through mechanical friction and water, but it's not specifically from the techwash.

 

If you use wash-in to add extra DWR when you fabric already is well DWR-ed, then you are wasting money.

 

So do the Techwash.  After the cycle is done, you should be able to  plainly see if water is still soaking in anywhere.  Or if you are not sure, hang it up to let it complete drying, then stick your item under the faucet to test the DWR and see if it gets wet, or if it sheds the water.

 

Think of it like wax on a car (wax=any modern car protectant product, even if it's not wax).  

If a car is well-waxed, water beads up.  If there's a good coat of dirt on top of your wax, the water pools and soaks into the dirt.  

If you just wash away the dirt, but the wax remains, the water will beads up again (techwash)

If all the wax is gone, and it's just plain paint or clearcoat; then the water pools up. Get your car waxed (wash-in)

In all cases, your car is still waterproof.

 

Final tip: 

I saw that nikwax has sprayon product.  The spray on products could be much more financially efficient.  

This site also suggests you can use 303 High tech fabric guard also, which gives you a lot of bang for your buck.  It's often found in car/marine detail supply shops.  I happen to have a bottle for other purposes, but have not tried it on my ski apparel

http://www.nrsweb.com/tech_talk/dwr.asp

post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

So do the Techwash.  After the cycle is done, you should be able to  plainly see if water is still soaking in anywhere.  Or if you are not sure, hang it up to let it complete drying, then stick your item under the faucet to test the DWR and see if it gets wet, or if it sheds the water.

 

 

Based on my experience, I completely disagree with this statement.  DWR coated fabrics will all wet-out eventually, even if they're brand new.  This is exactly what will happen when you wash it, as it's submerged in water for that length of time.  When you pull it out of the washer, the fabric will be completely wetted out; you won't be able to tell anything.  At that point, you should absolutely run it through the dryer, not just hang it to dry.  The heat from the dryer will help rejuvenate the DWR coating.  Every outerwear manufacturer I've read recommends machine drying to do so.

post #35 of 36
you won't need to re-apply a dwr product for a good time... use just the techwash, I also second the suggestion for the spray on instead of wash-in.

here's a good video from arcteryx
http://vimeo.com/53191284
post #36 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by splitter View Post

Granger's stuff is blue-sign approved, if that matters to anyone...


Nikwax's Tech Wash is a detergent/soap that shouldn't strip the DWR finish from the garment.  Theoretically a typical detergent will strip that finish and/or leave a residue that will inhibit the re-applied DWR to not adhere.

 

Oil and dirt hold water longer and compromise the integrity of the DWR finish.  Keeping clothes clean is important for keeping them waterproof.

 

DWR isn't what keeps your waterproof stuff waterproof though.  A hard-shell has a waterproof membrane.  The DWR will cause the water to bead up and not wet-out the outer fabric.  If the outer fabric has wetted-out then your garment's breathability has been compromised and you'll feel clammy and think your jacket isn't waterproof anymore.

 

But, rather than not washing your technical clothing because you don't have a fancy way, the better choice is to go ahead and wash it with whatever you have available.

 

Running it through the dryer for a short time on low heat will also reinvigorate the DWR finish.

I, too, always had the best luck with the the old "Wash it lots, dry it warm" philosophy that Gore reccomends.  I have about seven years of skiing (350 days or so) on my gore tex stuff and it still works pretty well. I follow a schedule of washing it two or three times a season with Tech wash or Grangers (Grangers seems better) and using a spray-on-and-dry in dryer DWR renewal product (again Grangers seems to work the best). The garments are starting to bead a little less now, simply  because they are wearing out on the outside a little. If you use a cleaner that doesn't wash away the coating, washing is good because it keeps the membrane clean and breathing well, which will keep you dryer than any DWR anyway.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Washing/waterproofing ski jackets/pants.