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Instructor Morning Sessions Brainstorming

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

To all Coaches and Instructor Trainers.


I have recently been put in charge of Instructor Training this Winter for me Ski School and looking for suggestions on Session Idea's outside the ones I have currently planned?


If you have any good ideas or memorable sessions that you have taught or perhaps even attended that really hit home  and brought  deep discussion?

 

Any help would be great.


Thanks

 

Fs^^

post #2 of 10

Alot depends on how your sessions are structured - ie 1 hour every morning? or 3 hours in one block every week? or? Are the sessions split by level or experience level, or do you have rookie instructors with experienced?

 

It also depends alot on your SS Staff and what they want to achieve...after all, it is THEIR session. 

 

 

Tell us more.


Edited by Skidude72 - 11/6/12 at 3:52pm
post #3 of 10
At Breck we have voluntary weekday morning training in which the trainers generally ask whoever shows up what they want to work on for the hour before first lineup.

We also have day-long voluntary training for each level of certification led by examiners as well as special focus sessions on things like "beyond level 6" or "big mountain experience". etc. Mandatory (paid) training is restricted to safety for everyone and intro to area/teaching for new instructors.
post #4 of 10

FS,

 

First, a common theme we try to visit in all clinics whether it is teaching or ski improvement:

 

Directional movements, vision, and pole action are directed toward the desired direction of travel.

Fore-aft balance is maintained with pressure distributed appropriately along the length of the ski.

Lateral balance and pressure is managed appropriately from outside ski to outside ski.

Rotational (guiding) movements of both skis originate in the lower body and are appropriate to the task.

    ■ Progressive increase and decrease of edge angle occurs with both skis as needed.

Flexion and extension movements effectively manage balance and pressure, and help release and engage the edges from turn to turn

 

The following is an example of topics & brief descriptions for our scheduled on hill clinics during the first few weeks of the season.  Of course we also have impromptu sessions both indoors & out, depending on the needs & wants of the particular group:

 

Week # 1:  Early season warm up

 

This clinic should help to get your stance & balance up to speed to progress through the season.  Also, designed to get your teaching & presentation skills up to speed.

 

   * Vertical side slips

   * Pivot slips

   * Hockey stops

   * Balance over the downhill ski in a traverse both directions

   * Balance against the outside ski earlier & earlier in the turn & turning on one ski

   * Javelin turns

   * Skating on the flats

   * Balance with a flexed leg on the uphill ski in a traverse, both directions.

   * Early weight change to new outside ski & extend into new turn.

   * 1000 steps

   * Dynamic medium radius turns on easy blue terrain.

 

Week # 2:  Improving wedge turns & general class handling

 

Utilizing the “Teaching Model”:

 

          * Introduction

         Overview

         Goal setting

         Building rapport & trust

 

* Body of the lesson

         Explanation

         Demonstration           

         Practice

         Feedback

 

* Conclusion

         Summary        

         Future

         Etc.

 

This Clinic is designed to help you take your student from their first wedge turns & get them “skill ready” to easily transition on to parallel turns.

 

* Error detection & correction

* Narrowing the wedge

* Turn shape to control speed

* Blend skills more evenly

* Vary speed

* Different slopes

 

Week # 3:  Games & drills for children

 

This clinic is a fun, fast paced clinic to help you have some fun activities to do with your children’s classes.  Games & drills that are also great skill builders:

 

* Skating

* Skiing Switch

* Whirlybirds

* 1000 steps

* 100 hops

* Cat & mouse

* Simon says

* Red light – green light

* Hockey stops

* Target Skiing

* Leapers

* Jumps

* Woop de doos

* Carve a thon

 

There are many more, be creative & everyone will come up with some great ideas.

               Remember if it is fun for kids it is probably fun for adults as well.

 

Week # 4:  Wedge turns to parallel & various turn shapes

 

Explore how to help our students make the breakthrough to parallel turns & enter the intermediate zone.  We will look at the different approaches to getting rid of that stubborn wedge.  At the same time we will develop different turn shapes & the skills to open up more of the mountain.

 

 

Hope that helps,

 

JF

 

 

 

post #5 of 10

A quick 30-60 min clinic I run on a regular basis is a Train the Trainer. Show/teach the group what you are working on in your own skiing. I'm still facilitating and providing coaching, but they are ski instructors and it really helps to solidify and idea or even change it if you try to teach it to others.

My longer clinics are on a somewhat revolving schedule of exam prep, video analysis of personal skiing conditions du jour, trees steeps and moguls.

We also give quick 15-30 min sessions every weekday where we pick a task from out Flipbook at random or take a suggestions from the crowd and work it through as we warm-up or legs and minds for the day.

 

Nate

post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by nateteachski View Post

A quick 30-60 min clinic I run on a regular basis is a Train the Trainer. Show/teach the group what you are working on in your own skiing. I'm still facilitating and providing coaching, but they are ski instructors and it really helps to solidify and idea or even change it if you try to teach it to others.

My longer clinics are on a somewhat revolving schedule of exam prep, video analysis of personal skiing conditions du jour, trees steeps and moguls.

We also give quick 15-30 min sessions every weekday where we pick a task from out Flipbook at random or take a suggestions from the crowd and work it through as we warm-up or legs and minds for the day.

 

Nate

 

Just to add as Nate reminded me,  Our scheduled clinics are usually done in 2 hour blocks AM & PM & run Th. - Th.  On Thursdays we will also run a train the Trainer session going over the next weeks topic so that everyone is on the same page.  We have a lot of part time instructors scheduled on different days during a given week, so this schedule gives a chance for everyone to attend.  We will even add a shortened late afternoon session for those who have been teaching all day.

 

I post a calender of the scheduled clinics before the season starts so folks can plan accordingly.  Most of these clinics are pretty generic & can be adapted to any instructor level, even within a mixed group. 

 

More specialized clinics are added as the needs of the staff develop.  We also have a "Clinic Request Form" that any staff member can submit for a particular date or topic.  I will encourage them to try & form their own group of like minded Instructors, but do our best to accommodate all requests.  An Instructor can also submit a topic with a brief outline if they would like to conduct a clinic in their particular area of expertise.

 

Apprentice (1st year) Instructors begin the season in a separate program.  They are required to have 18 hours of training prior to teaching their first lesson.  The topics of their training include the following:

 

           Indoor - practical information

       Personal ski improvement

           First time on skis (FTOS)

           Class handling

           Teaching model

           Skills concept

           Movement Analysis (basic error detection & correction)

           Improving wedge turns

           Games & drills

           Peer teaching

           Class shadowing

           Level 1 portfolio & workbook

 

 

 

 

                                  

In

 

Ind

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys! This will help with my planning and lesson plans.

Fs^^

post #8 of 10

There are 3 kinds of clinics you should be offering:

1) What you need

2) What they need

3) What they want

 

You probably have topics that are required (e.g. safety) and you probably have problems that needs to be solved (complaints from guests, lessons not moving fast enough or making enough progress). You also need to identify staff that aren't getting it. The teaching a level 1 lesson clinic can be extremely boring, but it needs to be taught to everyone every season because this is the bulk of what we do and we can improve every year.

 

Some of your pros will be on exam track and need training focused on exam prep. Other pros simply need help moving up the food chain to teach different populations (kids, seniors, women, adaptive, whatever), higher levels or more disciplines, etc. more effectively. From experience, you know what they need.

 

Regardless of what you know, they want something different. It may be moguls, powder, ice, steeps, trees, park/pipe etc. It may be tour the mountain. It may be movement analysis. It may be personal skiing. It may cross discipline. It may be how to tune skis. Hell it even could be tubing.

 

 

The real trick is deciding whether to train the trainers to :

a) follow a format and deliver a consistent message across your training catalog

b) work under a broad structure and let them fill in the blanks

c) let them freelance on each topic

 

If you're really good, you'll find a way to accomplish all things in all clinics. Every clinic should teach how to teach by being an example of a great lesson.

post #9 of 10

" Every clinic should teach how to teach by being an example of a great lesson."

 

Amen.  An ex-training director of mine was a task master and a technician.  He would occasionally trot out his notes on the teaching model and make sure everybody had the elements memorized, but PRACTICE them in clinics?  Never.  Can't count the number of times we'd get half hour into it and whisper to one another "so, what is this about?"  Building raport, trust, taking care of group dynamics?  Not in this program.  Two runs at a small ski area in 1.5 hours was par for the course.  I left a lot of good friends behind when I sought to get away from what I came to understand was a toxic mentor.

post #10 of 10

Here's an idea for a quick clinic.  Have everyone teach something without speaking a word during their teaching segment.  It's fun, challenging, and gets the creative juices flowing.  They will be surprised how much they can teach by doing and not talking.

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