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East Coast One Ski Quiver - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrizzledVeteran View Post

And at 170 lbs, the original poster isn't going to have serious flotation problems on a Kendo.
To Matt511 -- I think the Kendo is fine, but I would think the next size up in the Kendo would be preferable. 177. That's what I would ski at 150 lbs.

Coupla comments. First, agree with Jim that twin tips are not the same as a typical flip tail. OTOH, did not read the OP syntax as "I want a twin tip," but as "if you mention a twin, please take the reduced running surface into account." So...th_dunno-1[1].gif maybe he needs to clarify his meaning, but he seems fairly, ah, open to suggestion. But then, it's probably more fun for us to reinvent his question, likes, and style. wink.gif

 

Tend to agree with GV, mostly, on Kendo over Mantra for eastern groomers, although the Mantra will be superior in chop or trees. Also I'm 165 and have found a stiff 88-ish ski with minimal rocker is too narrow for soft snow in trees, where most of it lives, or for any trip out west, which is mentioned too. 95 - 105 is the sweet spot for tradeoffs between maneuverability and float in soft, also for do-everything trips west IMO; obviously depends on style and terrain. As far as length, a 177 at 5' 10" and 150 lbs in east coast conditions is borderline, I'd say. If you ski fast and like a boot front/tip pressure style, then yep, the right length. If you're more moderate, or if you like a more neutral stance, the 170 will make you happier. For the west, definitely the 177. Solution, for my .02, is a different ski. Something like the Dynastar Outland 87 will do better in trees, bumps, softer snow than the Kendo, 178 will work on either side of the country, gives up a bit in grip, but IME "grip" is overrated. Meaning that if you keep your skis tuned, can achieve a decent edge angle, and understand how to use your edges, most skis under 90 mm will do fine on hardpack or ice. If you tend toward lower edge angles, slide your finishes, have a more neutral stance, then you'll need all the innate grip you can buy. Similar argument to stiff beefy skis, which actually cover up as many mistakes as they create. duck.gif

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post #32 of 46
Beyond,

Don't you think a skier who skis a more relaxed and moderate-speed style would be better off on a ski less demanding than the Kendo, rather than skiing the Kendo in shorter length? Why give up the length when what you really need is more forgiveness? I think a more relaxed skier would have more fun overall on a less demanding ski. It reminds me of lightweight, non-aggressive skiers who are in stiff boots when they should be in softer boots. Flex and forgiveness correlate, IMO. And IMO they relate directly to aggressiveness and overall average skier speed... up until we have a skier who is heavier than average people of the same height. But that's why I think of weight, rather than height, as the more relevant factor in sizing skis to a given skier.

In an average year, at most Eastern ski hills, how much snow is really there in the trees off-piste? When I lived back there, off-piste usually meant thin or non-existent coverage at most ski hills. But I still think narrower waists work better in tightly spaced trees, unless the snow is fairly bottomless.
post #33 of 46
Thread Starter 

As the OP, I would like to clarify.

 

I by no means am a a "park skier".  Every once in a while I'll go through and hit a rail or pop a 360.  That is it.  I would say probably 5% of my skiing is park.  The vast majority, as I said earlier, is on east coast resort groomers, hardpack crust and ice when its unavoidable.  I rarely am in the trees and mostly avoid the bumps.  I also am removing the west coast trip aspect of my inquiry.

 

When I mentioned twin tip I was unclear as to which skis are true twin tips and which are raised.  I would prefer a ski that would allow me to ski switch but it is in no means a requirement.  The Kendos appear to be raised in the back and would allow for me to occasionally ride or land switch without completely falling on my face.  However, switch skiing is still a very minimal aspect of my skiing so I am not sure if it is worth factoring "early rise" into my ski sizing.

 

Also, if it is of any additional use, I usually do bomb down the frontside groomers.

 

Thank you!

post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by evanl93 View Post

As the OP, I would like to clarify.

 

I by no means am a a "park skier".  Every once in a while I'll go through and hit a rail or pop a 360.  That is it.  I would say probably 5% of my skiing is park.  The vast majority, as I said earlier, is on east coast resort groomers, hardpack crust and ice when its unavoidable.  I rarely am in the trees and mostly avoid the bumps.  I also am removing the west coast trip aspect of my inquiry.

 

When I mentioned twin tip I was unclear as to which skis are true twin tips and which are raised.  I would prefer a ski that would allow me to ski switch but it is in no means a requirement.  The Kendos appear to be raised in the back and would allow for me to occasionally ride or land switch without completely falling on my face.  However, switch skiing is still a very minimal aspect of my skiing so I am not sure if it is worth factoring "early rise" into my ski sizing.

 

Also, if it is of any additional use, I usually do bomb down the frontside groomers.

 

Thank you!

 

All the more reason to get the Volkl Kendo.  That ski rocks, and it will emancipate your inner charger.

 

Plus, the price is right compared to the Atomic Crimson Ti and Blizzard Magnum 8.5 Ti.

post #35 of 46
Do you think that Head iPeak 84 or 90 would be a good option for an eastern skier?
For myself, 5'7" 165lb, I just bought iPeak 90 170cm. Now considering 84s for my wife.
They are just significantly cheaper than Kendos.
post #36 of 46
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeroGravity View Post

This just in:

 

http://www.skinet.com/ski/galleries/mixed-snow-east-mens?src=facebook


while that will tell you what ski's are worth demoing it hardly gives u an answer as to what ski to buy. I personally hated the e88 as i found it felt too grippy or hooky and felt very heavy

post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eastcoastdad View Post


while that will tell you what ski's are worth demoing it hardly gives u an answer as to what ski to buy. I personally hated the e88 as i found it felt too grippy or hooky and felt very heavy

 

 

Very true. You probably should buy skis on the recommendations of a magazine, or a forum question biggrin.gif

 

Skis are a personal thing and ideally should be tried before buying, but the list is a good starting point. Personally, none of them fit my tastes.

post #39 of 46

If you are using the troublemaker, you would find the aftershock like a old friend (good thing).  Try the 169cm and the next size larger.

post #40 of 46
Thread Starter 
I have been doing a lot of research on the Kendo's and looking into the prices as well. Obviously the 2012 model is significantly cheaper. My questions are:

Do you think the changes made to the 2013 model are significant enough to warrant the price increase?
Would I be best suited on 177 or 170s considering my 5'10 170lbs self and the terrain I ski?

Thank you!
post #41 of 46

177 is fine; the new model is not worth the step up in price
 

post #42 of 46

Renting if you only ski out west, or off piste in deep powder on occasion is good advice. I recently got back into skiing after a 10 year layoff (because life sucks sometimes), and I ski East Coast hard pack/ice crud. Took my first trip out west Snowbird, Brighton, Solitude, then a 6 hour drive to Telluride to chase a storm (29"), and I took my boots (custom fitted), but rented the Mantra. Absolutely fell in love with them (Powder, Corduroy, chop), they handled everything out west has to offer. That said as much as I would love to buy a pair of Mantras, I feel like they would be a waste for the terrain I'm forced to ski;my present living situation (outside Phila). That said I will take a trip out west at least once a year from now until I need to wear adult diapers, it was a life changer. So I will just rent for those trips, no biggie. Just make sure your boots are top notch. get a ski for the east coast that is versatile enough for when the east Coast has a good year, but can handle hard pack too.

post #43 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by evanl93 View Post
 

Hey everyone,

 

I am a 19 year old 5'10, 170 pound guy who is an advanced east coast skier (wary of saying expert).  The majority of my skiing is done on hard pack, ice and crust..the typical new england conditions.  I am looking for a one ski quiver that can handle all of the east coast conditions and potentially allow for a few trips out west in the powder.  I currently have an older pair of 165 Dynastar Trouble Makers.

 

My questions are:

 

-What size should I get (taking into account twin tips)

-What size underfoot would be most appropriate

 

and just what model suggestions does anyone have?

 

Thank you!

 

I'd recommend the P802 made by Rocky Mountain Underground.  You should be fine on the 178cm, unless you prefer something a little longer.  The dimensions are 130-96-112.  Perhaps a little wide for a true East Coast ripper but definitely versatile should you take them off-piste or out West.  I've typically found skis with a waist between 95-105mm to be great in all conditions.  Here is a link to the description on the RMU site.

 

http://www.rockymountainunderground.com/p802-16

 

If you are looking for something a little bit narrower underfoot with a true twin tip I might recommend the Diam.  This is a symmetrical ski that can hold its own in the park but is really designed for tearing up groomers and bumps.  Tons of camber underfoot make them super poppy and playful.  Dimensions are 124-93-124.  Unfortunately this ski is only available in a 172cm, which may be a little small for you depending on your preference.  

 

http://www.rockymountainunderground.com/diam

 

Hope that helps. 

post #44 of 46

Allow me to point out that this thread flourished in 2012, ending in November of that year.  The OP is now past the age of majority at least — probably looking for another kind of ski entirely.

post #45 of 46

LOL good looking out ...Im new to the forum thing, so did not even notice the age of the thread, I just the topic of interest.

post #46 of 46
A common enough mistake. Zombie threads, they're called, threads from the dead.
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