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Another one ski quiver question

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone, I'm looking for a new pair of skis for the upcoming 2012-13 winter.

My Stats:

14 yrs

5'8"

140 lbs.

Aggressive/advanced skier

 

Our local ski area gets quite a bit of fresh snow, (460" annual snowfall,) however there are still many days with hardpack/variable conditions.

I ski in all snow types, but prefer powder.

The majority of off piste trails in our area are through trees, so a short to mid range turning radius ski is optimal

The vertical at our resort is pretty small (1600 ft)

 

Last year I was on the K2 Sidestash 2011 and loved it for it's versatility

The year before rode the Gotama Jr.- hated it- too short, poor carving, bad edge hold, not enough float.

 

This year my overall hope for a ski is one that can charge hard while still performing well in trees, float on powder, rail groomers, and handle variable conditions well.  

  

 This year I've narrowed my choices down to:

 Icelantic Nomad RKR (For all mountain performance)

Icelantic Shaman (For powder, trees, and groomers)

Mr Pollard's Opus (Playfulness, trees, groomers, powder) Very possible choice

Blizzard Cochise (Charging, all mountain performance) Very possible choice

K2 Sidestash (All mountain, hardpack, variable conditions, everything) Very possible choice

 

Feedback would be appreciated, Thanks!

Oh, and so far I haven't found any nearby demo shops. I live in Pagosa Springs, Co. Please let me know if you know of any nearby areas that I can find demo gear.

post #2 of 12

Since your "very possible choices" are all over the map as far as characteristics, I can only assume that you have no idea what you want. I'd suggest you approach from this angle...........you owned the Sidestash and it hasn't really changed. What do you want a ski to do better or differently than the Sidestash? If you can't really specify what you'd like to be better.....than just buy another Sidestash. If there is an area that you'd like to improve upon......then we can get somewhere. Keep in mind though that everything is a compromise and when you get better in one area, you generally get worse in another.

 

SJ 
 


Edited by SierraJim - 11/1/12 at 12:11am
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for bringing that up. I  guess I would like a ski that can navigate quicker through trees and bumps. I would like a little bit more playfulness in the ski as well.

Currnetly I like the sound of the Opus. It doesn't seem too much like the Sidestash, but still looks like a great ski. One thing I'm concerned about is how it handles in variable/chop. At our resort there are very few groomers, so skiing on a non pow day almost always means you will be on moguls or in icy trees. Any feedback/opinions on the Stash and Opus would be helpful.


Edited by johnmuirjr - 11/1/12 at 3:19pm
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for bringing that up. I guess I would like a more playful/nimble ski that handles well in trees and bumps.

Currently I like the sound of the opus, even though it doesn't seem too much like my Sidestash.

Any info/reviews on how the Opus handles compared to ths Sidestash would be helpful.

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

 Quote:

Thanks for bringing that up. I guess I would like a more playful/nimble ski that handles well in trees and bumps.

Currently I like the sound of the opus, even though it doesn't seem too much like my Sidestash.

Any info/reviews on how the Opus handles compared to ths Sidestash would be helpful.

Please ignore this, I accidentally posted twice.

post #6 of 12

If sidewalls float your boat, the Cochise is nice.

 

If cap construction does not scare you, the Line MPO would do the trick.

 

K2s ride wonderfully, their bases peel like an orange even more wonderfully.  If you tend to find rocks in your adventures, and if you overlap edges inadvertantly, I highly recommend a sidewall construction with higher density bases like ON3P, Moment, Blizzard, or Nordica among many.

post #7 of 12

Hi - Not sure your home mountain profile, short vertical, lots of trees, few smooth slopes, decent amount of powder, really favors the Cochise. It's more of a big mountain charger with a lot of versatility, according to the satisfied users. And the Opus seems pretty fat and soft for the ice and crud you describe. Why not something in the 98-102 range that's highly maneuverable, suitable for a lighter skier, like the Kabookie or Big Stix 98 or Prophet 98 or Armada TST? IMO above that becomes work in trees unless there's lots of new snow. 

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

Sorry if I misled you with my original briefing of the snow quality. Our mountain actually gets quite a bit of soft snow (465" annually.) On normal years, 8-12 of my 25-30 days skiing are through the powder. The others are normally groomer, mogul, and hardpack days. It is actually very rare that I find true variable conditions at Wolf Creek.The only place where there is true year-round variable snow is on the ridges, which get skied out within 3-4 days of a storm. (Yeah, there are very few skiers too.) When I do ski through trees when powder is non-existent, it is still quite a bit smoother and MUCH less icy than what you could find at other resorts. Our snow also stays cold and frozen until early April, so we don't get slush until late in the year.

 

On another note, I looked at the skis you mentioned. They all look like great skis, but with my revision on snow quality I'm not sure how they'd handle on the frequent deeper days we have here. What you said about the cochise made sense, but do you think the Opus would be better on these updated conditions?  


Edited by johnmuirjr - 11/1/12 at 8:59pm
post #9 of 12

OK.....now we've got something to work with.

 

First, some basics:

 

  • A "charger" ski is generally stiffer, more stable, less manuverable.
  • A "playful" ski is softer, lighter, more nimble but less stable.
  • These are just general sub-categories with lots of subtle variations within each.
  • Your current Sidestash falls a bit on the charger side.
  • The Cochise is also on the charger side and a little more so than the SS.
  • The MPO is on the playful side of the spectrum.

 

I think you need to decide between the two sides of the stiffness spectrum and when you do so, you'll be closer to your goals than you are right now.

 

You sound as if you don't want a "charger" and I think this is correct direction for you. Easy, quick and nimble should be better characteristics than stable and powerful. The MPO is one of several good choices in the ~~ 105-115 width range. Others that are about "medium" in the stiffness spectrum would include the Armada TST, Icelantic Nomad RKR, Nordica Patron and the Head Rev 105 among many others.

 

SJ

post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:SierraJim
You sound as if you don't want a "charger" and I think this is correct direction for you. Easy, quick and nimble should be better characteristics than stable and powerful. The MPO is one of several good choices in the ~~ 105-115 width range. Others that are about "medium" in the stiffness spectrum would include the Armada TST, Icelantic Nomad RKR, Nordica Patron and the Head Rev 105 among many others.v

I think you're right. I've looked at all the skis you mentioned, and while they're all high quality, none of them seem to fit my needs quite as well as the Opus and Sidestash do.   

So far I've opted out both Icelantics and the Cochise. I'm really leaning toward the Opus, which seems like it would do very well on our mountain. I'm also not throwing away the idea of another Sidestash, since I already know how well it performs on all conditions. It seems to me that the Sidestash will do better in crud and through other inconsistent snow types, while the Opus will perform better in consistent conditions, (groomers, powder, hardpack,) It looks like the Opus will perform better in trees, tight spots/chutes, and moguls while the Sidestash will ski slightly better in wide open areas like groomers. Does this evaluation of the two skis seem accurate?

 

Thanks for the help everyone.  

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmuirjr View Post

I think you're right. I've looked at all the skis you mentioned, and while they're all high quality, none of them seem to fit my needs quite as well as the Opus and Sidestash do.   

So far I've opted out both Icelantics and the Cochise. I'm really leaning toward the Opus, which seems like it would do very well on our mountain. I'm also not throwing away the idea of another Sidestash, since I already know how well it performs on all conditions. It seems to me that the Sidestash will do better in crud and through other inconsistent snow types, while the Opus will perform better in consistent conditions, (groomers, powder, hardpack,) It looks like the Opus will perform better in trees, tight spots/chutes, and moguls while the Sidestash will ski slightly better in wide open areas like groomers. Does this evaluation of the two skis seem accurate?

 

Thanks for the help everyone.  

 

Pretty good for MPO, not so much for the SS. The current version of the Sidestash is sort of an odd duck. It has a long rockered section with a relatively soft flex forward of the contact point and then a relatively stiff flex aft of that point. The result is that it feels pretty disconnected and tip flappy in most circumstances where you are on the snow rather than in it. OTH, the MPO is a pretty well balanced ski and it's a good example of a soft flexed ski done well. It's soft for my tastes but that's just me, I do like its balance and it skis well given some top end and stability limitations.

 

SJ

post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

 

Pretty good for MPO, not so much for the SS. The current version of the Sidestash is sort of an odd duck. It has a long rockered section with a relatively soft flex forward of the contact point and then a relatively stiff flex aft of that point. The result is that it feels pretty disconnected and tip flappy in most circumstances where you are on the snow rather than in it. OTH, the MPO is a pretty well balanced ski and it's a good example of a soft flexed ski done well. It's soft for my tastes but that's just me, I do like its balance and it skis well given some top end and stability limitations.

 

SJ

SJ, are you sure you aren't describing the Sideseth (previously the Obsethed)? I don't believe the Sidestash has a long rockered section at all (it does NOT have K2's "Powder Rocker"). I feel that his description of the Sidestash is pretty accurate. I also believe the Line MPO would be a good choice for a mountain like Wolf Creek.

 

To the OP:

 

How many of those other non-powder days are soft-snow crud days? My experience with Wolf Creek is that non-powder days still tend to ski like powder days at most resorts, if you're temporaly close to a powder day (2-3 days off). If your answer would be 50%, I'd push you more towards the MPO, otherwise I'd push you more towards the Armada TST. The MPO is pretty wide as an everyday ski if you still have a large number of hard-snow days, but it WILL be a lot better on powder days - it'll float higher in the snow, which is pretty important for a mountain that is layed out like Wolf Creek.

 

Wolf Creek is one of those places where a two-ski quiver is REALLY nice to have, since you can have really DEEP days, and it's short steep pitches and long flats in between can really bog down even skis that would be considered 'powder' skis at other resorts. Personally, if I was skiing at Wolf Creek all the time, I'd get something like an Armada TST, and buy a Praxis Powder Board off TGR in Gear Swap (you can find them really cheap, like $200 cheap).

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