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Smith Optics goggle lens information - Page 3

post #61 of 82

Ok, now is maybe the time to ask: Why does Smith put that dark outline on the lens?  It's completely unnoticeable from the outside, but it's VERY obvious and distracting looking out.  I bought a pair of IO/s last year to fit my Smith helmet, and after skiing a couple of days, I still can't avoid being bothered by it.  It really seems to limit peripheral vision and "boxes" me in visually.  WHY????

post #62 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post
 

Ok, now is maybe the time to ask: Why does Smith put that dark outline on the lens?  It's completely unnoticeable from the outside, but it's VERY obvious and distracting looking out.  I bought a pair of IO/s last year to fit my Smith helmet, and after skiing a couple of days, I still can't avoid being bothered by it.  It really seems to limit peripheral vision and "boxes" me in visually.  WHY????


You mean the seal for the double pane....I'm sure it needs to be there to seal the space between the lens.

post #63 of 82
Smith is unique because. They can seal the double lens with essentially a rubber o-ring, because they have this little Porex hole in the lens itself. Other. Companies have to use foam seals.
post #64 of 82
The seal seem to be a bit undersized however, because you can still see an outline of lens (and environment) between seal and frame, a bit strange when coming from other goggles.
post #65 of 82

yes, exactly.  If they have to seal, why not at the very edges of the lens instead of inside the field of vision?  I'm considering replacing my Smiths for only this reason.  It's really bothersome if you're used to a wide field of view.

post #66 of 82

Hi, can anyone tell if there is a big difference between Gold Sol-X Mirror (VLT:7%) and Blackout (VLT: 10%)? I need something for very bright days in Alps and in Europe is hard to find a store with Smith products, hence want to buy them without trying on ebay...

 

Does anyone has any experience with those lenses? Red a bit about Gold Sol-X Mirror but nothing about Blackout lenses. Which one would be better for very bright sunny days (March in Alps)? any suggestions? Thanks.

post #67 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomylee11 View Post
 

Hi, can anyone tell if there is a big difference between Gold Sol-X Mirror (VLT:7%) and Blackout (VLT: 10%)? I need something for very bright days in Alps and in Europe is hard to find a store with Smith products, hence want to buy them without trying on ebay...

 

Does anyone has any experience with those lenses? Red a bit about Gold Sol-X Mirror but nothing about Blackout lenses. Which one would be better for very bright sunny days (March in Alps)? any suggestions? Thanks.


Hi Tomy,

 

The biggest difference between the two lens tints would be the Gold Sol-X has a brown cast to it, and the Blackout is a grey base.  On the snow, my first recommendation is almost always brown based tints - even in bright sun conditions.  With that said, the Gold Sol-X is a very dark lens, and really is best suited for bright, direct sun days.  I know the Blackout lens is popular (had some lengthy discussions with the Smith guys about their goggle tints this past weekend at the Outdoor Retailers Winter Market here), but it would not be my go to suggestion for bright sun (or most any other light on the mountain either frankly.)

 

I know it can be difficult to figure out which lens is best if you don't have direct access to them.  If I may, I would also suggest their Platinum Mirror lens, which is slightly darker than the Ignitor, but not quite as dark as the Gold Sol-X or Blackout.  I also rather like the Polarized Rose Copper, which has the same VLT as the Platinum Mirror, with a slightly different color cast, and of course polarization as well.

 

Hope that helps!

 

Brian~

post #68 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uilleann View Post
 


Hi Tomy,

 

The biggest difference between the two lens tints would be the Gold Sol-X has a brown cast to it, and the Blackout is a grey base.  On the snow, my first recommendation is almost always brown based tints - even in bright sun conditions.  With that said, the Gold Sol-X is a very dark lens, and really is best suited for bright, direct sun days.  I know the Blackout lens is popular (had some lengthy discussions with the Smith guys about their goggle tints this past weekend at the Outdoor Retailers Winter Market here), but it would not be my go to suggestion for bright sun (or most any other light on the mountain either frankly.)

 

I know it can be difficult to figure out which lens is best if you don't have direct access to them.  If I may, I would also suggest their Platinum Mirror lens, which is slightly darker than the Ignitor, but not quite as dark as the Gold Sol-X or Blackout.  I also rather like the Polarized Rose Copper, which has the same VLT as the Platinum Mirror, with a slightly different color cast, and of course polarization as well.

 

Hope that helps!

 

Brian~

Brian obviously knows his stuff. I would say lenses below 10% VLT like Gold Sol-X and Blackout are for glacier travel in spring/summer months with intense sunlight for extended periods of time. Those lenses will not be much fun if you end up in the shade or some cloud blows in. I use the Ignitor Mirror for sunny days in Whistler as it is still usable in trees/shady slopes and is fine for the sun as well as long as I am not skiing directly into it. If I was in the sun more often I would get the Platinum mirror.

post #69 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by gramboh View Post
 

Brian obviously knows his stuff. I would say lenses below 10% VLT like Gold Sol-X and Blackout are for glacier travel in spring/summer months with intense sunlight for extended periods of time. Those lenses will not be much fun if you end up in the shade or some cloud blows in. I use the Ignitor Mirror for sunny days in Whistler as it is still usable in trees/shady slopes and is fine for the sun as well as long as I am not skiing directly into it. If I was in the sun more often I would get the Platinum mirror.

I tried skiing with my glacier glasses--photochromatic with a filter factor of 4 which I think means less than 10% VLT--about a month ago. I was just about blind in any shady area. Photochromatic lenses don't change nearly fast enough for skiing in and out of shade.

 

My experience with different lenses--for example comparing Ignitor Mirrors with Blue Sensor Mirrors--is that on flat light days the Sensors are definitely much brighter but the difference in contrast is not enough to be meaningful, at least not to me.   

post #70 of 82

Thank you all for respond. Seems that the best choice for me would be either to buy Platinum mirror or Polarized Rose Copper. Hard decision especially if I can't try neither of them prior to buying. I think that this time I will stay with my Ignitor mirror lenses and see if they are still OK for me in bright sunny days in March.

post #71 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomylee11 View Post
 

Thank you all for respond. Seems that the best choice for me would be either to buy Platinum mirror or Polarized Rose Copper. Hard decision especially if I can't try neither of them prior to buying. I think that this time I will stay with my Ignitor mirror lenses and see if they are still OK for me in bright sunny days in March.


Having used both of these lenses regularly, I'd say try the Platinum mirror first.  I tend to grab it first myself anyway...and on the up side, its usually also a little cheaper.  :)

 

Cheers

 

Brian~

post #72 of 82

I recently bought a pair of Smith Prophecy goggles that came with the red SolX lens.  As we won't be skiing until the mountain opens in December, I was wondering what conditions this lens is best suited for.  Nowhere in the entire thread have I seen any mention of this lens as being someone's 'favourite'.  Can anyone help me?  I noticed in the Smith chart that it mentions bright days... but how good is it when the light is flat?

post #73 of 82
Thread Starter 
The red solx lens blocks red, orange and yellow light (due to the reflex color of the mirror). This effect causes what you see through the lens to have less of those colors - shifting your visual experience towards blue. In general, this is not a good color shift for any flat or low light environment and the human eye.

This lens, as well as the red sensor and the blackout lenses from Smith Optics are designed to look pretty from the outside...but generally don't do you any favors from a visual experience stance.

Hope that helps.
post #74 of 82

Uilleann,

 

Do you have any information (or opinions) on Smith Navy Archive Yellow?  (I posted a question about Smith Navy Archive Yellow and Kelly Digital Blue Sensor Mirror here.)

 

According to the levelnine website, The Navy Archive Yellow and the Kelly Digital Blue Sensor Mirror are both for low light settings.  (I assume that KD is a blue sensor mirror lens.)

 

Would one be better for dealing with flat light situations?

 

Tog,

Thanks for these posting charts on the different Smith lenses.

http://www.epicski.com/t/124714/smith-blue-sensor-mirror-vs-red-sensor-mirror

If you have a chart for Navy Archive Yellow (or the name that Smith uses if it is different), it would be nice to see.

 

Thanks in advance.

post #75 of 82
GreyPilgrim,

You should note that Navy Archive is the frame color, Yellow is the lens color. Likewise, kelly digital is the frame color, blue sensor mirror is the lens color. That said, I haven't skied with the yellow so I can't compare them. if you're looking for a low light lens, you'd likely be happy with either.
post #76 of 82

jaobrien6,

 

Thanks.  This clarifies it for me.  I originally thought that Navy Archive Yellow and Kelly Digital Blue Sensor Mirror were different colors from Yellow and Blue Sensor Mirror. (Frame Style Lens Type).

post #77 of 82

So it seems that VLT information is somewhat bogus, and Smith is making up numbers.

 

I noticed this year that the Blue Sensor, a common low-light favorite for its 70% VLT, is suddenly advertised as 60% VLT.


http://www.smithoptics.com/us/Root/Men%27s/Accessories/Lenses/I-OX-Replacement-Lenses/p/IL7AZ2 (click show lens info)


Unless you go to other parts of their site, where it says 70% also:
http://www.smithoptics.com/us/lensSelector


I emailed them asking which is correct:


"There are slight variations in the lens VLT because of the mirror finish on them, but the blue sensor lens is closer to the 60% than the 70. There was a miscommunication last year with the VLT."

I guess if by "last year" she meant "the last 10 years".

 

Anyway, this year it seems like they added a Yellow Sensor Mirror, which is supposedly 65%. So, possibly better than the Blue Sensor? It doesn't come with any of the stock configurations though.

 

I also noticed that many sellers list the lenses as "2", as in "Sensor Mirror 2". Did they revise the lenses?

post #78 of 82
Red sensor is darker than blue sensor and better in partial sun, IME. Dunno about numbers...
post #79 of 82

First off, thanks for such an informative thread.  I bought some Smith I/Os 2 years ago in large part due to threads like this one and have been very happy with them.  I currently have the Blue Sensor Mirror and Ignitor lenses.  I just got back from a trip with consecutive bluebird days and am now looking to add a bright sunlight lens, when skiing in those bright conditions I would have liked to have a darker lens than the Ignitor.  I've narrowed it down to either the Green Sol X Mirror or Platinum Mirror.  Side note - on some websites (Smith's direct website) I see a lens called the Rose Platinum Mirror.  I'm assuming this is the same as the Platinum Mirror and is just a naming convention thing, correct?

 

I'm looking for something that is skiable in bright direct sunlight but won't be too much of a burden for short trips into the shadows and trees.  Between the two lenses I'm considering, I'm guessing the Green Sol X is the better performer in direct sun, while the Platinum will perform better in the shadows.  Is that accurate?  From the graphs I did notice that the Green Sol X appears to have much higher VLT at higher wavelengths than the Platinum though, but I'm not sure how that would come into play in the direct sun and shadow conditions I'm evaluating.

 

I was leaning towards the Green Sol X since the Platinum seems to be similar to an all-purpose lens, but for sunnier days than the Ignitor.  But since I already have a good all-purpose lens in the Ignitor, I was thinking the Green Sol X would be the best one to complete the set of lenses I'll need for pretty much all conditions.  Thoughts?

post #80 of 82

I've found that the Smith I/O Polarized Rose Copper lens provides the best clarity and comfort for me in cloudy, flat light or somewhat foggy to full sun conditions. The polarized lens makes a marked difference in clarity for me.

 

In storms or very foggy weather, I like the Blue Sensor mirror lens the best.

 

The thing is that not everyone's eyes respond to various tints in exactly the same way. This is further complicated by the fact that the proliferation of tint colors by goggle makers seem to be influenced  by marketing considerations  as much or more than anything else . If you have the opportunity, you may want to go lens hunting when the weather conditions match up with the need that you are looking to fill. Try an number of of lenses in the store while looking out the window to see what provides you the best visibility, contrast and eye comfort.

 

Good luck.:)

post #81 of 82

To answer my own question earlier this year, the lenses have all been revised. I don't think the tints/colors changed, but the rubber gasket piece on the lens is now much cleaner and thinner. It looks like a molded piece now that is stuck on, rather than previously where it was a shoddy strip applied by hand and often slightly misaligned.

 

They also have ChromaPop lenses this year. I've heard good things about those in sunglasses. Curious how well the ChromaPop Storm performs in low light compared to the Yellow Sensor 2 or Blue Sensor 2. VLT is lower, at 50%, but VLT isn't everything. At $95 a pop, I'd want to be damn sure I can see new things before buying. 

post #82 of 82

There are a lot of goggle threads floating around. I can't keep track of what I posted in which thread.

To paraphrase what Chekhov said about disease treatments and cures--"The fact that there are so many different kinds of low light lenses means that none of them work."

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