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adjusting demo bindings to different boot length - Page 2

post #31 of 47

I have never demoed a ski that was not set in 5 minutes tops.Never seen any other adjustments but forward pressure.

Not rocket science,Always set din first then set front to boot size, then heel,step into bindings adjust screw flush,step out and check again.

Easy,But then again i might do my own brake job or many numerous tasks,that many will not attempt or don't feel comfortable doing.

If you feel comfortable doing it,do it.It will make you a more rounded skier

post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post

I do not see demo huts using torque wrenches. They don't always even match your boot to the ski. I've seen them ask for your BSL, set the binding to your boot size and then watch you step into the binding to see if it looks to be "about right". I like having multiple skis for different conditions so I buy used skis with demo bindings for my family. I personally  have two pair of boots with different BSL lengths so every time I change boots I have to check my bindings to see if they are set to the boot I'm wearing. I get my bindings checked and serviced at the start of each season. I'm sure I've made mistakes but I know ski shops make mistakes too so I'm OK accepting my shortcomings instead of farming the work out to someone else. The one critical area that you've got to be careful with that is sometimes overlooked is the toe pressure. Since each style of binding has its own method of identifying the correct pressure it can make it a little tricky.

On a demo binding once you set bsl and have the customer step into the binding checking the forward pressure indicator should just take a quick glance.  They may be doing it without you realizing it.  If not you might want to learn how to check it yourself.  You should also know your DIN and check that yourself.  Especially at mass rental shops at the ski areas. A couple of other factors people might want to be aware of--your DIN setting goes up one line when you turn 50--so if you're in good shape and ski hard you might want to lie about your age if you are already at level 3.  And I've seen a marker DIN chart that uses levels 1-4--level 4 is just one line lower than 3 obviously. If you're skiing lines with bad fall consequences it's probably a good idea to drop down a line from 3. But if this applies to you you already know it I hope. 

post #33 of 47

I have one of those torque wrenches cost me about $20.00 years ago, just have to make the rest of the components.  Pretty simple.

post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

On a demo binding once you set bsl and have the customer step into the binding checking the forward pressure indicator should just take a quick glance.  They may be doing it without you realizing it.  If not you might want to learn how to check it yourself.  You should also know your DIN and check that yourself.  Especially at mass rental shops at the ski areas. A couple of other factors people might want to be aware of--your DIN setting goes up one line when you turn 50--so if you're in good shape and ski hard you might want to lie about your age if you are already at level 3.  And I've seen a marker DIN chart that uses levels 1-4--level 4 is just one line lower than 3 obviously. If you're skiing lines with bad fall consequences it's probably a good idea to drop down a line from 3 not use Markers unless they go up to 20 or 30  But if this applies to you you already know it I hope. 

 FIFYbiggrin.gif

post #35 of 47
Always annoying when you are after info on how things work and how to do stuff for youself and the thread gets cluttered with the usual get somebody else to do it opinions.
I'm not a builder but have built my own house, I'm not a boat builder but build my own boats. I'm not a ski tech but mount and adjust my families bindings and wax/tunemyself.
There is heaps of info out there on how to do stuff.
If somebody asks for info rather than an opinion then either provide the info or move on to another thread where opinions are being sought.

rolleyes.gif
post #36 of 47

You're correct on the toe piece

Move the rear piece until its firm against the heel.

Click the boot in

Use screw driver to adjust forward pressure, (yellow window, you should a line in the yellow window.)

Adjust din to her desired setting.

 

But if you aren't confident in your binding skills, take them into shop.

Do it in the middle of the day when nobody is in there, offer them $5 cash, shouldn't be a problem

post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigr View Post

Always annoying when you are after info on how things work and how to do stuff for youself and the thread gets cluttered with the usual get somebody else to do it opinions.
I'm not a builder but have built my own house, I'm not a boat builder but build my own boats. I'm not a ski tech but mount and adjust my families bindings and wax/tunemyself.
There is heaps of info out there on how to do stuff.
If somebody asks for info rather than an opinion then either provide the info or move on to another thread where opinions are being sought.
rolleyes.gif

I agree to point them in the right direction, at the same time on some issues (ie safety) also suggest common  sense.  It is fine to injury ones self, but to experiment with some else I think is not right.

 

Agian the initial question was to adjust son's skis to fit wife's boot, not their own boot.  (ie its ok to break my wife leg but not my own rolleyes.gif).

post #38 of 47

The ski tech at Sun Peaks' Falline Tuning shop was torque testing ski patroller's bindings today. All employees that are on skis as part of their job are required to get their bindings certified as correctly calibrated at the start of the season in order to satisfy the Worker's Compensation Board.

 

The rental/demo fleet gets done as well and the ski tech said they rarely find bindings off on the calibration. Most of the fleet gets replaced each year so that probably helps. New retail bindings do not get tested.

post #39 of 47

"The shop isn't doing anything I'm not doing"  <------ FALSE.  If you're going to a reputable shop, the adjustments are done by TRAINED technicians who have not only passed technical testing from the binding manufacturers, but they have also attended binding training seminars and clinics in order to gain and sustain current knowledge about binding function.  Along with that, they are TESTING the binding in a number of ways.  They should test for binding to boot fit and retention, boot rebound, dry vs wet release, and over all release values measured in newton meters, which requires the use of a ski testing vice (around $2500.00), torque range wrench ($150), and prosthetic testing foot and leg ($400).  This is the CHEAP version, there are auto testing machines made by winterstieger and others that go for around $12000.00.  Go ahead and adjust your own equipment if you think it's not rocket science, but when your simple a$$ is riding down the mountain on a sled attached to a snow mobile, I'll high five you on the way by on your many talents which most obviously include binding adjustment.  Forgive my vitriole, but I hear this argument constantly, that it's not hard, that if the boot "clicks" in then the binding is adjusted.  Nothing could be farther from the truth. There really is no debate here, if you haven't had your bindings adjusted to the specific boot you plan to use with that ski, then you WILL eventually wreck and get hurt.  Would you trust yourself to adjust and fix your own brakes on your car without some sort of training?  No, it would be stupid.  You're not only endangering yourself by doing your own "adjustments", your endangering other skiers and snowboarders who you're going to crash into as well.  Do it for the kids.

post #40 of 47
Blah blah blah feel better now?
post #41 of 47

Scrun..Scr..Sc...Scrotu...?  What's your name?  Yeah, I feel great!

post #42 of 47

his point is you joined today and resurrected a thread 4months old on a subject that has been beaten like a dead horse here and in other threads.

 

Don't take me the wrong way, I don't mean to be the one squashing your right to free speech, and i am not a moderator nor do i want to be the forum nazi.

but this was a 4month old dead discussion that nobody was really looking at anymore.  Even if your point is valid, your words and energy are wasted.  It is the same as shouting into the wind.  

 

So my constructive advice is you are better served saving and spending your energy on live discussions where someone has a question you can help, or there is an active debate (but again where there is someone who still is undecided or a n00b, and not just 2 sides entrenched with no real changing of opinions.

post #43 of 47

Fair enough, not my first forum, and I realized that the thread was old. But if that was the intent of "Blah, Blah, Blah..." then perhaps that's what should have been posted. I'll keep your advice in mind.  Thanks.

post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibmon323 View Post

"The shop isn't doing anything I'm not doing"  <------ FALSE.  If you're going to a reputable shop, the adjustments are done by TRAINED technicians who have not only passed technical testing from the binding manufacturers, but they have also attended binding training seminars and clinics in order to gain and sustain current knowledge about binding function.  Along with that, they are TESTING the binding in a number of ways.  They should test for binding to boot fit and retention, boot rebound, dry vs wet release, and over all release values measured in newton meters, which requires the use of a ski testing vice (around $2500.00), torque range wrench ($150), and prosthetic testing foot and leg ($400).  This is the CHEAP version, there are auto testing machines made by winterstieger and others that go for around $12000.00.  Go ahead and adjust your own equipment if you think it's not rocket science, but when your simple a$$ is riding down the mountain on a sled attached to a snow mobile, I'll high five you on the way by on your many talents which most obviously include binding adjustment.  Forgive my vitriole, but I hear this argument constantly, that it's not hard, that if the boot "clicks" in then the binding is adjusted.  Nothing could be farther from the truth. There really is no debate here, if you haven't had your bindings adjusted to the specific boot you plan to use with that ski, then you WILL eventually wreck and get hurt.  Would you trust yourself to adjust and fix your own brakes on your car without some sort of training?  No, it would be stupid.  You're not only endangering yourself by doing your own "adjustments", your endangering other skiers and snowboarders who you're going to crash into as well.  Do it for the kids.


Okay, Mr. Thread Ressurector, I will modify my statement. The shop in Norway (or pretty much anywhere in Europe going on descriptions I've heard) isn't doing anything I'm not doing. They don't do all that testing. They adjust the binding to the boot (or to the approximate length if I didn't happen to have the boot with me) and send me on my way. Chances are they'll ask me my weight and divide it by 10 to set the DIN. I can read the tech. manuals. I've even watched Tyrolia's instruction videos, which is all you need to do to get "qualified" by them. I can adjust forward pressure according to the manuals. There's also no concept of indemnification here -- the shop will work on your skis/bindings, though they might give you some friendly advice about upgrading. And you know what, I really don't think more people get hurt over here than over there. But nobody is going to sue a ski shop over a ski accident here, so they don't have to wallpaper their arses with documentation and tests. I'm not saying that testing is a bad thing - but in most of the world it just doesn't happen.

 

And you know what? Both my skis released sensibly last Tuesday when I straddled a GS gate at speed, even though I mounted the plates myself, mounted the bindings on the plates and adjusted the release and forward pressure myself. Despite the release pressure being deliberately set to Type III+++.

post #45 of 47
Thread Starter 

I was the originator of this thread, so I'll mention two items of relevance.

 

  1. I ended up going to the shop to have the bindings adjusted for my wife. I frankly think it was overkill, but it didn't cost much and would avoid me a lifetime of guilt and recrimination if my wife got injured.
  2. Last week I rented demo skis in France. The guy used one of my boots to set the length on both skis, set the DIN to the number I had told him, did not use any tools other than a screw driver, and sent me on my way to tackle the steeps of Chamonix.
post #46 of 47
The statement about all that testing is a joke. Ever attend the retail demo days? I think not. Here's how it works. You tell the rep what you want to ski. They ask your BSL and DIN, they set the bindings for that and hand you the skis, you snap in and the rep makes a quick visual check of forward pressure and adjusts if needed. You then go ski. That's all folks.
post #47 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

The statement about all that testing is a joke. Ever attend the retail demo days? I think not. Here's how it works. You tell the rep what you want to ski. They ask your BSL and DIN, they set the bindings for that and hand you the skis, you snap in and the rep makes a quick visual check of forward pressure and adjusts if needed. You then go ski. That's all folks.


I run retail demos and dealer demos. So yes, I know how they work.  Do you?  Every manufacturer or shop is required to provide the mountain/resort in which the demo is held with documentation verifying the serial numbers and test dates of all the equipment they intend to demo, along with required insurance info.  Demo skis fall under the same category as rentals and as such, are only required to be tested at the beginning of the season and periodically throughout.  So the demos you think the reps/shop rats are just throwing on your feet have all been tested (or at least are supposed to have been tested) in the manner which I stated above. 

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