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How do YOU ski in the trees??? - Page 2

post #31 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

ahhh, trees....

 

1000

 

 

 

 

1000

 

I knew I didn't like you. [Insert green with envy smiley here.]

post #32 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post

I do it VERY CAREFULY!  Trees will kill you real fast.


Very carefully is correct.

 

Unless you know the terrain and obstacles, carefully scout your lines.  There is always another lap when you can rip your line.  Better still, ski with a buddy who can help if you are stopped and need help.

 

IDK how many times I found myself at the top of a good drop, and my tip deflects on a hidden stump/root/rock and I'm helpless.

 

It can get pretty ugly, one time I spun and was caught by a branch at arm height that caught me above a large air.  There I was standing next to a new buddy with his arm cradling me(a dead tree with a perfect branch).  I sorted out my binding then once calmed, I shot the air.

 

Also leave room around tree wells, they really suck, figuratively and literally.

post #33 of 54

I have learned over the years to appreciate the late apex.

 

Motorcar racing has three lines around a corner, the early apex when you stay tight to the turn at the start leaves momentum throwing you off the apex and scrubbing speed once out of the turn(bad).

 

The ideal line straightens the turn as much as possible while staying on the track, you begin on the far side from the apex, then cross it taking your momentum to the outside of the turns exit(best).

 

The late apex in skiing is taking that same line only waiting a beat before taking the apex.  This line leaves you room to adjust your line if any surprises catch your attention.  It is a bit slower than the perfect line, but you can carry speed easier with more confidence this longer way around the turn.

 

Additionally, when some miscreant loots your stash, their ideal line will leave a berm next to their track that makes for a nice pillow for your "second skier through" track. 
 

This tactic works in the bumps as well as in the trees.

post #34 of 54

In steep tight trees i find myself often taking a more across the fall line route than straight down the fall line.

post #35 of 54
I WANT to ski the untracked or at least less traveled lines in the trees. However, in practice, where I ski, I often find that the neglected lines are SO tight that they're not actually fun. At least not for someone of my current ability.
post #36 of 54

Untracked if at all possible.

post #37 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post

...Trees will kill you real fast.

 

 

Tree's don't kill people.............

post #38 of 54

I don't ski in the trees. I ski around the trees.

post #39 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiingblind View Post

I don't ski in the trees. I ski around the trees.

 

I ski a different route. I ski between the trees.

post #40 of 54

 trees were put here to hold the good stuff for us, and weed out those who traverse back and forth accross powder runs. :-)

 

a shot of a good day at Bach,

 

1000

post #41 of 54

oops should have sent with first pic.

 

look at all that space :-) and note, no tracks dropping........yet

 

1000

 

 

1000

 

 

and in the long run it doesn't matter where you make your tracks, just that you make them.

 

1000

post #42 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

 

I ski a different route. I ski between the trees.

I meant this.    lol

post #43 of 54

How I ski the trees?  Somewhat cautiously and with full utilization of the Stem Christie to control my speed and initiate the turn. We'll see how I progress this year. I have one day in so far with a goal of a 100 day season.yahoo.gif

 

post #44 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kase-1 View Post

 

No he meant track like a pre-carved out route that tons of people have taken for the whole season
 

Following 1 or 2 sets of tracks in fresh snow is totally fine, i was more put off by him suggesting that going down the ice luge 3ft below the fresh snow that was like skiing on a hockey rink was the best way to ski the trees


Completely agree.  The trees at Jay and MRG are generally very tight and steep (esp top of MRG), much tighter than most trees out west and much tighter than pix on this thread.  Half the time you can't see more than 1 turn ahead through the pine branches.  In fresh snow they're wonderful.  But if you're the 20th skier, much less the 200th, they've turned into the luge-run channels you're talking about and they SUCK.  You turn where the channels goes and that's it unless you're on 3 ft long skis. I transforms from floaty bliss to survival skiing very fast.  If I can't do them before they're skied off I'd rather not do them at all.  I have this conversation with a buddy who always wants to ski the trees regardless of how skied off they are.  I always tell him it'll suck, he always says it won't and so we meet at the bottom - and then he always says "yeah, it sucked."

post #45 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Raue View Post

 


Completely agree.  The trees at Jay and MRG are generally very tight and steep (esp top of MRG), much tighter than most trees out west and much tighter than pix on this thread.  Half the time you can't see more than 1 turn ahead through the pine branches.  In fresh snow they're wonderful.  But if you're the 20th skier, much less the 200th, they've turned into the luge-run channels you're talking about and they SUCK.  You turn where the channels goes and that's it unless you're on 3 ft long skis. I transforms from floaty bliss to survival skiing very fast.  If I can't do them before they're skied off I'd rather not do them at all.  I have this conversation with a buddy who always wants to ski the trees regardless of how skied off they are.  I always tell him it'll suck, he always says it won't and so we meet at the bottom - and then he always says "yeah, it sucked."

 

I’ll say this, there’s plenty of super tight trees in the West, but they’re rarely skied.

 

Why? Because there’s so many perfectly pitched and spaced out trees (see Finndog’s photos) that nobody really cares to go into trees that require a machete and hockey mask to navigate.

post #46 of 54

Actually, here if you do bushwack, you can find nice clearings that no one hits very often.  Just make sure you go with the kind of friend who will STAY WITH YOU.  I've gotten separated here and none of us could hear the other ones yelling for them, and no cell phone service.  Whistle?  Couldn't hear it enough to get a bearing.  Not pleasant when you're not 100% sure where you are.  (We were all fine, just spent some time sniping at each other when we reconvened.)

post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Actually, here if you do bushwack, you can find nice clearings that no one hits very often.  Just make sure you go with the kind of friend who will STAY WITH YOU.  I've gotten separated here and none of us could hear the other ones yelling for them, and no cell phone service.  Whistle?  Couldn't hear it enough to get a bearing.  Not pleasant when you're not 100% sure where you are.  (We were all fine, just spent some time sniping at each other when we reconvened.)

 

Big difference between a short bushwhack to get to the goods and a continuous spruce, log and root beatdown for 1200’.  

 

For whatever reason, some guys love that type of terrain. To each their own rolleyes.gif

post #48 of 54

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowfan View Post

 

 

Tree's don't kill people.............

1000

post #49 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Actually, here if you do bushwack, you can find nice clearings that no one hits very often.  Just make sure you go with the kind of friend who will STAY WITH YOU.  I've gotten separated here and none of us could hear the other ones yelling for them, and no cell phone service.  Whistle?  Couldn't hear it enough to get a bearing.  Not pleasant when you're not 100% sure where you are.  (We were all fine, just spent some time sniping at each other when we reconvened.)

 

YEP!  this is exactly the stuff Ira and hunt for once the goods get scarce. Its a lot of fun to pick your way through the thick. Half skiing half Orienteering. then you find a short but sweet and deep line. it's all worth while. But having a trusted partner is so key. 

post #50 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

 

YEP!  this is exactly the stuff Ira and hunt for once the goods get scarce. Its a lot of fun to pick your way through the thick. Half skiing half Orienteering. then you find a short but sweet and deep line. it's all worth while. But having a trusted partner is so key. 

Finndog, hopefully you don't mind me referencing this  as I agree with the statement.

 

When I ever get the opportunity to do so I hope that I can partner up with some of our more experience members (if they'll have me) to learn whats important (hopefully without learning the hardway).  While I'm very good, I do know that I don't know this (as my experience is more in glades on more controlled inbound conditions and out of bound to the extents of which you all enjoybiggrin.gif) and guidance/shared wisdom is appreciated.

post #51 of 54

My preference is to ski next to tracks in sidecountry (back country at times so long as I have a ride back up), although if I am really familiar with the terrain I'm happy to trail break. I love "glades" out West because they are actually glades- here on the EC you really do need the hockey mask and machete; out West you barely need to turn, just handle steeps, drops, tree wells, and snow dumps. On the EC, tree roots, stumps, and rocks jutting upwards are serious hazards. We just don't have the caliber of snow that the WC (incl. Rockies) gets where those things get covered up by several feet of snow. You can just ski free out there man, No Fear. Bowls are dreams although I gotta put in a word for the "classic" VT/New England glade with tight trail, limited turns (eg, your choice, the left side or the right side of the 1' wide trail...), high speed, and boundaries (mountains, ridges, cliffs, ultra dense trees) on either side. I just hate machete glades and I go in deep enough where frequently my "glade" turns into wall to wall forest. Where does the glade end and the forest begin?  I get that question wrong too often :(

 

PS: Yes, yes, I know about the Orange markers...

post #52 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by dracop View Post

My preference is to ski next to tracks in sidecountry (back country at times so long as I have a ride back up), although if I am really familiar with the terrain I'm happy to trail break. I love "glades" out West because they are actually glades- here on the EC you really do need the hockey mask and machete; out West you barely need to turn, just handle steeps, drops, tree wells, and snow dumps. On the EC, tree roots, stumps, and rocks jutting upwards are serious hazards. We just don't have the caliber of snow that the WC (incl. Rockies) gets where those things get covered up by several feet of snow. You can just ski free out there man, No Fear. Bowls are dreams although I gotta put in a word for the "classic" VT/New England glade with tight trail, limited turns (eg, your choice, the left side or the right side of the 1' wide trail...), high speed, and boundaries (mountains, ridges, cliffs, ultra dense trees) on either side. I just hate machete glades and I go in deep enough where frequently my "glade" turns into wall to wall forest. Where does the glade end and the forest begin?  I get that question wrong too often :(

 

PS: Yes, yes, I know about the Orange markers...

 
   ah, well that was kind of hard to follow, but I think i  know what he means.  Point is, narrow eastern trees are NARROW, you have no  choice where to turn and no view beyond the next tree.  Forget those wide open tree shots.  the top of MRG is comepltely closed in and 40+ deg.  Sidecountry off
Cannon some thing.  Badass shit.  The first few runs are heaven. When it gets scratchy it just sucks, NOBODY skis it well. horror show. I'm humbled every time.

post #53 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post

You sound like an uptight jerk.
I haven't read all the posts, so,sorry if I've duplicated

 

I think you are way out of liine here.nonono2.gif

post #54 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

I think you are way out of liine here.nonono2.gif
Perhaps I was. Apologies. I think I read it the wrong way after a couple beers.
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