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Trying to build a 2-ski "mini-quiver"

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I am moving to Salt Lake City for the winter, and I'm trying to pick 2 pairs of skis for the season. I would love any recommendations for 2 skis that will serve me well at Alta/Snowbird/Solitude. I'm 21yrs, 6'1 165lbs. I hate trying to classify my level, but I've been skiing for 16 years and I am pretty confident. Probably level 8. 

 

My initial thoughts are something 85-90mm at the waist for everyday use and something 105-120mm for powder days. Maybe the Bilzzard Bushwacker or Volkl Kendo paired with Rossi s7 or Atomic Bent Chetler? I have also been looking at the ON3P Billy Goat or Caylor as the fat ski.  

 

I am also not opposed to demoing after I move to SLC, but ideally I would have at least one pair of skis when I show up in December. Really, any input would be awesome.

post #2 of 14

I'm not a SLC local nor have I been there, but if it were me I'd go 95-105 for my everyday ski in a place that gets as much snow as SLC. There seems to be a lot of good ~98mm skis right now and that's what I'd be looking at.  It doesn't seem like you'll be on really hard snow that often and if carving is your thing something like the Experience 98 might let you do it while still being nice for some new snow days.

 

I have the Billy Goat for a soft snow ski, but I live in the east and I didn't get to take it out much last year, so I'm loathe to give too much feedback.  It seemed fun when I got it out though.

 

Could you describe your style rather than your level?  Do you prefer playful or powerful?  Jibbing off stuff?  Maching through things? That can guide your search as well.  The S7s and Bent Chetlers are supposedly pretty playful and at least the former are pretty easy to ski (can't weigh in on the latter).  The Billy Goats are less easy, less happy on groomers and maybe less playful but will be happier to charge and will fold up less in crud.

post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euripides33 View Post

I am moving to Salt Lake City for the winter, and I'm trying to pick 2 pairs of skis for the season. I would love any recommendations for 2 skis that will serve me well at Alta/Snowbird/Solitude. I'm 21yrs, 6'1 165lbs. I hate trying to classify my level, but I've been skiing for 16 years and I am pretty confident. Probably level 8. 

 

My initial thoughts are something 85-90mm at the waist for everyday use and something 105-120mm for powder days. Maybe the Bilzzard Bushwacker or Volkl Kendo paired with Rossi s7 or Atomic Bent Chetler? I have also been looking at the ON3P Billy Goat or Caylor as the fat ski.  

 

I am also not opposed to demoing after I move to SLC, but ideally I would have at least one pair of skis when I show up in December. Really, any input would be awesome.

 

Lots of choices would work out well for you.  I'm a Rossignol on-hill guy, so take that into consideration when you hear my recommendations.  I have two primary skis for Jackson Hole and I think they make an outstanding quiver for a western powder mountain.  I ski the Super 7 in the 195 and the Experience 98 in the 180.

 

So, I think you might like Rossi S7 or Super 7 (probably the 188cm) for the powder ski and the Experience 98 for your "everyday" ski.  Ski that one short.  I weigh 30# more than you and I think the 180cm is PLENTY long for me.

 

Good luck and have fun.  We lived in SLC for several years and I loved it.  Great skiing and great every other kind of outdoor recreation you can think of.

post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euripides33 View Post

I am moving to Salt Lake City for the winter, and I'm trying to pick 2 pairs of skis for the season. I would love any recommendations for 2 skis that will serve me well at Alta/Snowbird/Solitude. I'm 21yrs, 6'1 165lbs. I hate trying to classify my level, but I've been skiing for 16 years and I am pretty confident. Probably level 8. 

 

My initial thoughts are something 85-90mm at the waist for everyday use and something 105-120mm for powder days. Maybe the Bilzzard Bushwacker or Volkl Kendo paired with Rossi s7 or Atomic Bent Chetler? I have also been looking at the ON3P Billy Goat or Caylor as the fat ski.  

 

I am also not opposed to demoing after I move to SLC, but ideally I would have at least one pair of skis when I show up in December. Really, any input would be awesome.


I have reviews for the BG, Caylor, and Bent Chetler in my sig.

post #5 of 14

Easy choices are a bonafide, Hell-and-back or E-98 and then pick something for powder days based on your preferences.  I don't know how you ski, where/what terrain you ski, your preferences for soft, stiff, heavy rockered, traditional etc for powder. So many to choose from!  I am just about your size and think something about 110-125 is a decent width underfoot for powder but its not nearly just about the width underfoot.  You have to find something that matches your style and where/how you will be using them.  Best of luck to you! 

 

some to consider

 

DPS 112rp

Blizz' Gunsmoke

Nordica Patron or Helldorado

Atomic Access

Rossi s7

Salomon Rocker 2, 115

 

And that's just scratching the surface!

post #6 of 14

I moved to UT last year and had a similar conundrum. 

 

Here are several things that made my choices more "interesting":

  1. Being so close to so many great hills meant I skied more often than ever in the past.
  2. Skiing more often meant I skied more "non-epic" days than when I chose to go mostly when it snowed or was snowing.
  3. Very few storms hit so I skied a lot of man-made and hard snow.

 

My advise:

  1. Get at least one "powder" ski.  If you plan to mostly avoid hard snow conditions the idea of a 95-105mm ski plus a 110+ ski is good. 
  2. If not, get a good carving ski for firm snow fun.
  3. My experience with the E98 in a 180cm was that it was too stiff to provide confidence on firm/icy slopes for my 165-170lbs weight.  You might try a Prophet 98 or Bonafide.
  4. The DPS112 was lots of fun in the trees and on "powder" days.  Those resorts are all great fun on both "playful" skis AND more serious, charging skis.
  5. Provide more info on what kind of skier you are to get better recommendations.  Are you an ex-racer?  Into drops, jumps & smearing more than laying rails? 

 

I went from a two ski quiver to a 3 ski one (I kept my old Prophet 100's but rarely skied them), and this year I am considering adding another one or two.

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone for the input! 

 

I should probably have included info on my style from the get go. I'm not an ex-racer, but I grew up skiing on hard snow in NY and I definitely like laying rails on groomers from time to time. For the past 6 years, I've been fortunate to ski a lot more soft snow at Alta/Snowbird and Squaw, but I'm still a little hesitant to have my narrowest ski be 98mm. I was thinking 85-90mm for the daily driver, but everyone seems to think that is too narrow. I guess it would be ideal to have 3 pairs (one narrower for carving), but unfortunately I don't have enough $ saved up. Am I really never going to want something smaller than ~100mm? 

 

For the fat skis, on a scale of 1=super playful to 10=complete tank I think I want around a 4-5. I definitely like rocker in soft snow and something a bit playful and "turny", but I don't want a complete noodle. I'm building up my confidence with drops. The tallest I've aired so far was probably around 8-10 ft, but I expect to do more this winter.

 

I totally see how guys end up with massive quivers.  This is tough. 

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post


I have reviews for the BG, Caylor, and Bent Chetler in my sig.

That reviews of the BG and the Caylor both sounded really good. Playful when you want but not going to get tossed around in crud is pretty much what I'm looking for, I think.

post #9 of 14

With your background I think you'd be wise to have an under 90mm option.

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by hirustler View Post

With your background I think you'd be wise to have an under 90mm option.

I agree...there are lots of ways you could go with this but good skiers can do just fine in most soft snow conditions with a 100 mm ski.  If you can ski, powder is always fun regardless of what you are on.  While I am sure a WC racer can lay down some nice tracks with a 100 mm ski, I doubt that it will feel as responsive as a narrower ski and this will take away somewhat from the fun factor.

 

I own 5 pairs of skis ranging from GS race skis to 108 mm Scott P4s, but since moving to CO, the two that I have used the most are my 72 mm Dynastar Contacts and my 96 mm Fisher Atuas/Misfits.  

 

If I was you, I think I would go for a versatile carver in the 70 to 85 mm range and a versatile powder/soft snow ski in the 95-115 mm range. 

post #11 of 14

95-100 for everyday--Mantra is another one to consider if you want one with a carving emphasis, but there a lots of skis in that size range that will carve well. No reason a wide ski can't carve--slower edge to edge but once you're on an edge you're carving. Sidecut matters more than width.  At least 115 for a powder ski and a lot of people say more. Maybe a good skier can ski pow in anything (I can and I'm not a good skier) but it's a lot more fun on something wide.  Where I ski--Squaw--there are a huge number of amazing skiers and NONE of them are skiing powder in anything under 115. I know because I get to study their skis for hours in the huge KT lift lines on storm days. (I will say that skinny skis can slip through a lift line better than fat ones.)

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

95-100 for everyday--Mantra is another one to consider if you want one with a carving emphasis, but there a lots of skis in that size range that will carve well. No reason a wide ski can't carve--slower edge to edge but once you're on an edge you're carving. Sidecut matters more than width.  At least 115 for a powder ski and a lot of people say more. Maybe a good skier can ski pow in anything (I can and I'm not a good skier) but it's a lot more fun on something wide.  Where I ski--Squaw--there are a huge number of amazing skiers and NONE of them are skiing powder in anything under 115. I know because I get to study their skis for hours in the huge KT lift lines on storm days. (I will say that skinny skis can slip through a lift line better than fat ones.)

I'm starting to think it would be wise to just wait and demo some skis. I just don't have that much experience carving on anything wider than ~85mm. I was actually looking at the Kendo for everyday, which is pretty much a narrower Mantra as far as I can tell. So the Mantra might not be a bad choice. I definitely think I'll go 115-120 for the pow ski. Thanks!

post #13 of 14

As an Ex LCC skier, now living in CA I can say that I have done what you are talking about. 

I have two skis, that cover what you are talking about. 

I am about 150lbs and 5'8"

 

This year my everyday ski is a All mountain Blizzard Bonifide (108mm underfoot) in a 185cm - I found this to be a super amazing ski that can go anywhere on the mountain. it is quick side to side,

 

For my powder ski I am using the Icelantic Gypsy Ski - if you haven't tried an Icelantic ski I say GO TRY ONE! they rock. I have skied the keeper and the nomad, but this Gypsy is an awesome ski!

 

With this combo you can go anywhere in Utah. 

 

If you have any questions just ask!

post #14 of 14

Have a 2 ski quiver also with one other pair in reserve for early season rocks.    Blizzard Bonafide 180 is my everyday ski for groomers and off piste up to about 5 inches then put on my Rossi S7's at 188.  Good two ski quiver for everyday and powder.  Basically ski off piste in the trees etc., unless everything is completely frozen up.  Love the BLIZZARDS and am on them unless we get over 5-6 inches and then switch to the S7's.  Cat skiing and heli of course use the S7's

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