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Women's OTG Goggles

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Is there such a thing? I am looking for a pair for my girlfriend who wears glasses and can't use contact lenses (dry eye issue) so that she has better fitting ones than the Scott ones my brother uses - which are far too large and nearly covers her nose as well. She is smaller in stature, 5' 1" or so and thus needs a smaller frame for goggles. 

 

I was searching online for a bit but no luck - unisex ones are all that I've found. 

post #2 of 10

I would try smith ods2-rx adapter and some of the compatible goggles. there are 2 or 3 compatible goggles, I think that's the best RX goggle solution available. I couldn't find any goggle that would be comfortable using over glasses, so I ended up getting the rx adapter this year.

 

http://www.smithoptics.com/products/#/Sunglasses/Prescription+Sunwear/ODS2-RX+Adaptor/view/

post #3 of 10

I would stay away from Smith totally, unless their kids goggles would work..  Their goggles are on the large end of the spectrum.  I need OTG goggles because of astigmatism and switched from Smith to Bolle last year and the difference was amazing.  The Smith goggles often created problems with my breathing and the Bolles were more comfortable and I never had an issue with breathing using them.  Bolle says their Boost OTG goggles are a "small fit" so those might be a good option.  There are quite a few new goggles makes but most of them don't seem to make OTG goggles.  I think Scott also makes OTG goggles but their website seems to be kinda hosed right now and it only shows one goggle.

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by roastpuff View Post

Is there such a thing? I am looking for a pair for my girlfriend who wears glasses and can't use contact lenses (dry eye issue) so that she has better fitting ones than the Scott ones my brother uses - which are far too large and nearly covers her nose as well. She is smaller in stature, 5' 1" or so and thus needs a smaller frame for goggles. 

My daughter and I have used our Smith IO/S with glasses.  I'm petite and she's 12, so have pretty small faces.  Our glasses frames also are on the small size though.

 

Has she ever considered the 1-day disposable contacts?  The newer versions are a lot easier on the eye.  That's what I usually wear for skiing, unless only going out for a hour at night.

post #5 of 10

I wear Smith IO goggle and actual have very wide framed glasses. So I have bit of tension on the arms when wearing the goggles (pain in a@#).  Otherwise I wear contacts.

 

I have tried some off the OTG googles made recently and am not impressed as they in most cases are extra large goggles.

 

The goggles of yester-year had slots cut into the foam for the glass arms to slip into to avoid the pressure and still provide a good fit (may try that on my IO).

post #6 of 10

Roastpuff, there have been many discussions on this forum regarding the use of glasses with goggles.  (I know because I was in that boat too – and nothing seemed to work).  One of the usual participants in those threads is an optometrist (ophthalmologist?) in Salt Lake City with lots of factual info. on various brands of goggles.  If you search this forum for “OTG goggles” or “skiing with glasses” (and sort by relevancy vs. recency) you will see posts by this person (member name Uilleann) in many of the threads.  I’d be willing to bet that a PM directly to him will result in some very useful info. (It certainly did in my case).  In the end though, my experience supports Marznc's suggestion that you're girl friend at least try the one-day disposable contacts.  One brand (and model) in particular works best with dry eyes.  Uilleann can fill you in or you'll probably come across his recommendation when reviewing posts.  Though of course your girl friend should work with her own optometrist if she elects to try contacts.  Good luck and that's great that you're helping her out.

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfa81 View Post

I would try smith ods2-rx adapter and some of the compatible goggles. there are 2 or 3 compatible goggles, I think that's the best RX goggle solution available. I couldn't find any goggle that would be comfortable using over glasses, so I ended up getting the rx adapter this year.

 

http://www.smithoptics.com/products/#/Sunglasses/Prescription+Sunwear/ODS2-RX+Adaptor/view/

I'm trying to keep the cost reasonable, so RX inserts are maybe for later on if she does decide to keep going with skiing/snowboarding and we decide that a regular OTG doesn't cut it. Thanks for the suggestion though! 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

I would stay away from Smith totally, unless their kids goggles would work..  Their goggles are on the large end of the spectrum.  I need OTG goggles because of astigmatism and switched from Smith to Bolle last year and the difference was amazing.  The Smith goggles often created problems with my breathing and the Bolles were more comfortable and I never had an issue with breathing using them.  Bolle says their Boost OTG goggles are a "small fit" so those might be a good option.  There are quite a few new goggles makes but most of them don't seem to make OTG goggles.  I think Scott also makes OTG goggles but their website seems to be kinda hosed right now and it only shows one goggle.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

My daughter and I have used our Smith IO/S with glasses.  I'm petite and she's 12, so have pretty small faces.  Our glasses frames also are on the small size though.

 

Has she ever considered the 1-day disposable contacts?  The newer versions are a lot easier on the eye.  That's what I usually wear for skiing, unless only going out for a hour at night.

So try the smaller Smith goggles? I will try to keep a lookout for Bolle OTG goggles. The ones that we have are old-school Scott goggles with a super-dark lens, which I think will be too dark for most of the skiing we do - lots of cloudy/low-vis days in the PNW. I will talk to her about disposable contacts to get her thoughts on it - thanks for the idea on that one. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

I wear Smith IO goggle and actual have very wide framed glasses. So I have bit of tension on the arms when wearing the goggles (pain in a@#).  Otherwise I wear contacts.

 

I have tried some off the OTG googles made recently and am not impressed as they in most cases are extra large goggles.

 

The goggles of yester-year had slots cut into the foam for the glass arms to slip into to avoid the pressure and still provide a good fit (may try that on my IO).

Yes, the ones that we have do have those slots - but are sized for a much larger head than hers. I also had a pair of Oakley L-frames that fit glasses great, though they are no longer produced it seems. Too bad! :( 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jdleuck View Post

Roastpuff, there have been many discussions on this forum regarding the use of glasses with goggles.  (I know because I was in that boat too – and nothing seemed to work).  One of the usual participants in those threads is an optometrist (ophthalmologist?) in Salt Lake City with lots of factual info. on various brands of goggles.  If you search this forum for “OTG goggles” or “skiing with glasses” (and sort by relevancy vs. recency) you will see posts by this person (member name Uilleann) in many of the threads.  I’d be willing to bet that a PM directly to him will result in some very useful info. (It certainly did in my case).  In the end though, my experience supports Marznc's suggestion that you're girl friend at least try the one-day disposable contacts.  One brand (and model) in particular works best with dry eyes.  Uilleann can fill you in or you'll probably come across his recommendation when reviewing posts.  Though of course your girl friend should work with her own optometrist if she elects to try contacts.  Good luck and that's great that you're helping her out.

I'll try contacting him! Thanks for the info. 

post #8 of 10

Hey guys, sorry I'm late to the party here, but I'll offer any advice than I can.  I'm almost out the door here and have to meet the wife soon for a dinner date (can't be late for THAT!) so I'll be brief, and then check back in to see if I can expand further if needed.

 

Concerning general vision with ski goggles and a need for Rx correction there are a few issues to consider:

 

Remember that not all goggles are created equal, regardless of initial perceived fit.  The lens quality can really be all over the map, to say nothing of the rest of the frame and strap construction.  You will get what you pay for in almost every case.

 

Almost all OTG style goggles will be larger.  That's in order to fit as many spectacle frames as possible.  The bigger the goggle frame, the more frames you accommodate, and the more sales you will generate with a given model.  The nature of the beast means that if glasses are indeed your girlfriends only true option, then a larger goggle may be the tradeoff.  There is often a small amount of compromise with these sort of systems, but it will be up to her if that level is too much to enjoy the sport both comfortably and financially of course.

 

Concerning contact lenses, there are a h-u-g-e number of lens styles that any qualified optician/optometrist/ophthalmologist can try to maximize quality of vision, and most importantly on the mountain perhaps, comfort and minimum dry eye issues.  There are in some rare cases eyes that just don't tolerate a lens well no matter what the scenario.  However, my experience has shown that a successful fit is as much about the motivation of the patient as the skill of the prescriber.  My suggestion would be to find and visit an optometrist (in particular) willing to work with her over time and to try several different options in CL's until she is perfectly happy.  Bear in mind, it may take numerous lenses before the perfect fit is found.

 

Ultimately, the insert style of goggle is the easiest to mitigate dryness issues if contacts are simply not possible.  As much as I like the integration, and as much success as I've personally had with the Smith Optics line, my one gripe is that they don't offer the smaller I/Os version in an Rx compatible style.  Yet.  I had a good long talk with our Smith rep this afternoon actually as he was in making sure our new goggles had all arrived in time for the season this year.  I was asking about a smaller Rx option, and he said he wasn't aware of anything coming down the 'pike currently.  But he knows I'm a bit obsessive about excellent on snow optics and promised to let me know if he heard anything internally.

 

Please do feel free to send me a note here anytime as I'm very happy to offer any and all assistance I can.  If a phone call is easier as well, it can help to cover a lot of information in a shorter time than typing here.  :)  Whatever works best for you two.

 

Here's to a great season everyone!

 

Brian~

CLASSIC OPTICAL

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the info Brian! I will bring that up with her to see which option she finds the most compelling. Here's to initiating a new beginner into the sport comfortably and safely! 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uilleann View Post

Hey guys, sorry I'm late to the party here, but I'll offer any advice than I can.  I'm almost out the door here and have to meet the wife soon for a dinner date (can't be late for THAT!) so I'll be brief, and then check back in to see if I can expand further if needed.

 

Concerning general vision with ski goggles and a need for Rx correction there are a few issues to consider:

 

Remember that not all goggles are created equal, regardless of initial perceived fit.  The lens quality can really be all over the map, to say nothing of the rest of the frame and strap construction.  You will get what you pay for in almost every case.

 

Almost all OTG style goggles will be larger.  That's in order to fit as many spectacle frames as possible.  The bigger the goggle frame, the more frames you accommodate, and the more sales you will generate with a given model.  The nature of the beast means that if glasses are indeed your girlfriends only true option, then a larger goggle may be the tradeoff.  There is often a small amount of compromise with these sort of systems, but it will be up to her if that level is too much to enjoy the sport both comfortably and financially of course.

 

Concerning contact lenses, there are a h-u-g-e number of lens styles that any qualified optician/optometrist/ophthalmologist can try to maximize quality of vision, and most importantly on the mountain perhaps, comfort and minimum dry eye issues.  There are in some rare cases eyes that just don't tolerate a lens well no matter what the scenario.  However, my experience has shown that a successful fit is as much about the motivation of the patient as the skill of the prescriber.  My suggestion would be to find and visit an optometrist (in particular) willing to work with her over time and to try several different options in CL's until she is perfectly happy.  Bear in mind, it may take numerous lenses before the perfect fit is found.

 

Ultimately, the insert style of goggle is the easiest to mitigate dryness issues if contacts are simply not possible.  As much as I like the integration, and as much success as I've personally had with the Smith Optics line, my one gripe is that they don't offer the smaller I/Os version in an Rx compatible style.  Yet.  I had a good long talk with our Smith rep this afternoon actually as he was in making sure our new goggles had all arrived in time for the season this year.  I was asking about a smaller Rx option, and he said he wasn't aware of anything coming down the 'pike currently.  But he knows I'm a bit obsessive about excellent on snow optics and promised to let me know if he heard anything internally.

 

Please do feel free to send me a note here anytime as I'm very happy to offer any and all assistance I can.  If a phone call is easier as well, it can help to cover a lot of information in a shorter time than typing here.  :)  Whatever works best for you two.

 

Here's to a great season everyone!

 

Brian~

CLASSIC OPTICAL

post #10 of 10

Certainly.  One other point I failed to mention the other night is this:  if she wears a helmet, it is an absolute m-u-s-t to wear the helmet with the goggles and the glasses all three at the same time.  If she happens to have multiple pairs of glasses that she might use, it is wise to bring them each to try with the goggles and helmet on as well.  While it doesn't happen to every skier, she might find that the fit with one combination of goggles, eyeglasses and helmet works brilliantly, while another with only a slight difference, may end up a complete nightmare.

 

I'm confident that with the right determination, and a little knowledge going in, she'll find exactly what works best for her!

 

Cheers!

 

Bri~

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