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Tips to Prevent Ski Injuries - Page 2

post #31 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

A few advanced safety tips:

 

If you ski in steep terrain, practice self-arrest: Self Arrest Techniques

If you ski in the backcountry, become an expert with your transceiver, probe and shovel

Spot your landing before launching air

Heed avalanche warnings

 

In the backcountry:

Keep away from avalanche routes like gullies

Steer clear of depressions in the snow for these can be crevasses

Ski down the fall line rather than cutting back and forth across the slope...

 

 

ALWAYS ski with at least one knowledgeable partner. Two are even better. 

post #32 of 52

I don't tend to ski fast in any conditions or terrain even though I often am negotiating steeps, tight obstacles, and bumps all of which can readily result in injuries if one is skiing beyond one's abilities then loses control.   The wise advanced skier knows how to push their limits over the long weeks of ski seasons without taking overly risky gambles.   There are a number of dangers due to collisions from other skiers and I'll add just one here.

 

With groups of novice male skiers, a frequent juvenile behavior is skiing fast in order to be one of the quickest back to lifts.  Lacking the ability to ski with a technique that looks even like an intermediate, much less an advanced skier, they will instead play the ego game of arriving back at lift lines before others as though that notion raises their status somehow as they wait for other slower members of their group to arrive.  Of course it isn't something any of them ever talk about beyond arrogant looks or whining how so and so is slow... The result are those poorly in control stiff looking turns at speed barreling down ski slopes.  The wise skiers will keep an eye out for such occasional menaces coming down slopes and be aware others in their group could be coming down not far behind them. 

post #33 of 52


 

#7.  I get the whole ipod thing.  However, if listening to HS dropout crackhead gangstahs (not that there's anything wrong with that) at top volume makes you an oblivious A-hole, hit pause (or turn it down) on the run and save melting your brain for the lift. Then you don't have to talk to creepy old guys like me.

This right here is an awesome point. LIKE! 

post #34 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post


Do you make any post that is not about the Knee Binding?

Sure, posted yesterday about the "Joey Clips" on the new Lange boot that was reviewed. Guess you also missed all my Nokian tire posts, and my post yesterday of memories of my uncle that taught me to ski and served in the 10th Mtn Div in WW2. But this stuff isn't about skiing safety so let's get back on topic!
post #35 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

The Rider Responsibility Code is the legal code on the slopes, while what we're after is all the other perhaps not so obvious stuff that experienced skiers know and do that has kept them from getting injured while skiing. 

Hey Nolo,
If you are referring to my post, I felt like that it's important to remind all skiers about it.
I don't really ski off piste and most of the dangerous situations I see are related to skiers of all level ignoring those basic rules. I feel also that 90% of on slope accidents are due to one or more skiers ignoring one or more of those rules. smile.gif

post #36 of 52
Thread Starter 

Yes, I was, and you are absolutely correct that reminding us of the Code is probably the first duty of this article I'm thinking of making out of this thread. Thanks for calling me on that. 

post #37 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

Yes, I was, and you are absolutely correct that reminding us of the Code is probably the first duty of this article I'm thinking of making out of this thread. Thanks for calling me on that. 

well... now you are gonna have to cite me in the credits section of your article! biggrin.gif

post #38 of 52
Thread Starter 

Heck, I'll cite the entire thread and everyone on it. 

post #39 of 52

Spot or know your exit before skiing a tight tree line.   


Soft snow?  Don't brake to a stop next to a tree.   Don't try for a hard turn next to a tree.

post #40 of 52

Don't take your skis off and try to walk a hard slope in ski boots.

post #41 of 52

The first day of skiing is like the first day of driving on ice, go to fast -> kick your own a**


Edited by snowyphil65 - 10/24/12 at 7:44pm
post #42 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post


Do you make any post that is not about the Knee Binding?
Lulz..I was waiting for that.
post #43 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowyphil65 View Post

The first day of skiing is like the first day of driving on ice, go to fast -> kick your own a**

ahahaha soo true!

post #44 of 52

If you are skiing through the trees, consider not using your pole straps, or use break-away straps. 

 

I'd rather hike back uphill for a dropped pole than yank my arm off.

 

Same if you are skiing avalanche terrain. No straps or break-away straps.

post #45 of 52

I can't agree more with you all!!!


I think ski is a risk sport. But several simple things can be done in order to create a more  reliable, safe and gratifying experience:


# 1 - "Know and follow the alpine code of conduct"

# 2 - "Pepare yourself physically: CORE, strength, flexibility, balance" my experience is "Being out of shape is the common enemy for nearly all ski trips", it's an incovenient truth! And for me either "flexibility goes a long way towards preventing injuries."

# 3 "Fuel.  Give your body something that it can run on for a few hrs" We may don't realize how much we burn on a ski day. It could reach something as 3k calories after 5 hours of medium ski day.

# 4 Balance - Keep the balance between challenging and gratifying experience.

post #46 of 52

Just assume that everyone around you is an idiot and will do the dumbest thing possible in every situation. Then consider skiing where there's no one around you at all. 

post #47 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post

Lulz..I was waiting for that.

Funny that I thought the point of my post was that some injuries are just bad luck and that no amount of "physical preparation", "skiing properly", or "falling properly" can prevent them. I offered the examples of getting blindsided on an almost empty steep slope, having someone fall into you on a lift line and getting knocked down, and getting tangled with another skier while disembarking a lift and falling, as examples of things that just happen outside of your control - and have caused or could cause serious injuries. Statistics say if you're out there enough days you can become the victim of bad luck occurrences outside of your control, and that's where safety equipment might possibly help.

It's nice for us all to say at the beginning of the season that we're going to control what we can to reduce injuries, but the fact is that reliance on "physical preparation", "skiing properly", and "falling properly" is not enough to prevent many things that can result in serious injuries - such as the concussion and blown ACL examples I cited.
post #48 of 52

I'd like to make a vital addition.  

 

Feel out and know your body before you ski.  Many of the hip, knee, shoulder, and back injuries were already present, before the final serious injury occurred during skiing.  Slight back pain, numbness in joints, popping or clicking in the knee, shoulder, or hip are all signs of an underlying injury that might be fixed with a little exercise program.  If you feel a catch in a joint, where it feels like it is locking up, but you push on, well that one probably needs surgery to fix the impingement anyway, but you can avoid a painful tear.

 

So my advice is feel out your body, put it through a variety of movements and stresses, listen to it, and do what you need to in order to avoid a minor injury turning into a serious one.

post #49 of 52

the best way to avoid ski injuries is don't ski. th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #50 of 52

I'm not advising anyone else do this, just throwing it out there but somehow, in retrospect, somewhere along the line, I got tired of having my knees tweaked and picked up the habit of just doing side or back breakfall and picking my feet and skis off the snow once I've determined that I've lost it (which thankfully hasn't happened all that often in the last few decades). 

 

On a side note, with my old SGs (long loooonnng side-cut radius), it was fairly easy to line them up with the fall line and put them down and start skiing again; with my SCs (13-m radius) this technique doesn't work so well.

 

I've also somehow become adept at not arguing with my skis; If an edge catches due say, to a hypothermia induced lapse of paying attention, or being distracted by a pretty...face, I pick the other ski up for an instant, ride that edge where it's going for an instant, pick both skis up and reset at a new angle of attack.  I can do that because I always have enough of a safety cushion of space around me.

 

One more thing.  Don't forget what skis you're on and what you shouldn't be doing on those skis!

post #51 of 52

and the #1 tip to avoid injury while skiing: go bowling instead.

post #52 of 52

Nice.  So can we now have a new thread; "Tips to Prevent Bowling Injuries"?

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