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How much time do you spend exercising per week?

post #1 of 52
Thread Starter 

Include aerobic activity like biking, running and hiking, as well as anaerobic activity, like weight lifting.  How does the amount of time and focus change with the seasons? 

post #2 of 52

4.5 hrs, metcons and lifting.

post #3 of 52

About six hours a week right now, going to turn it down to around 4.5 once season starts...

post #4 of 52
6-8 hrs./wk offseason, sometimes none during ski season.
post #5 of 52

This is a great topic.  I tend to spend ~ 9-10 hours per week involved in medium to high level activities.  These are your kettlebells, running, plyo's, lifting, spin bike, corework, & the associated warm-ups/cool-downs.  I'm trying to decrease that number some as gains via quality are just as important + sleep & proper diet.  Amazingly, diet & sleep require some time devotion.  Who knew? 

 

In ski season, I think the body takes quite a toll, so I spend more time in the recovery workouts, spinning, easy runs, light core, stretching, the stick, rumble roller & sleep.   Plus, my ski diet tends to leave a lot to be desired.  There is no green grocer on this hill, but I am better at packing snacks.

 

A goal for next summer is to be injury free & this will mean for cross training, more road biking & actually pulling the mtn bike out & using it.

post #6 of 52

Generally 5-7 hours.

But it is the quality & the intensity that is important.

As well as RECOVERY/REST/DIET

post #7 of 52
Thread Starter 

The time I spend depends on the season.

 

In late spring and summer, on weekdays I  ride two 1.5 hours days doing warm-ups, intervals and cool-downs, one to two 2 hour spin days, and on weekends , I ride 3 to 6 hours on each weekend day, for about 12 to 16 hours per week.  One or two of the days of the week might be diverted to the gym and one of the weekend days might be a long hike instead of a ride.  Going to the gym is less appealing in the summer, but its good to balance the riding and get some different core, leg and upper body and exercises in, as well as some explosive exercises

 

In the fall, things shift to more gym time (two to three 2 hour sessions) with more running when biking is not possible.  The total hours decrease a bit to more like 10 to 14.

 

Winter, for me, includes a combination of gym, nordic skiing and dh skiing.  Nordic, either classic or skate, is usually two to three 2 hour days per week, unless its really cold, then I spin or do the gym more.  I try to spin at least one day per week to keep the legs used to riding.  The rest of the time is devoted to dh skiing, which is usually opening to closing on both weekend days. 

 

I'm not sure how to count the hours for skiing.  Today, which was opening day at Nakiska, I skied from 10 to 3ish, with a 1/2 hour for lunch.  We did 8 to 10 minute loops on Gold chair, depending on lift lines and delays.  The lift ride is about 5 minutes and ski time 3 to 4 minutes  to ski down1537 feet.   So assuming about 25 runs, we skied 75 to 100 minutes for about 38,000 vert on sl skis - was tired at the end of the day -

post #8 of 52
7-10 hours a week, my day job is pretty physically demanding also. Mostly at the gym doing weights and cardio and I love rollerblading in the summer.
post #9 of 52

On average about 5 - 7 hours per week. I make sure I concentrate on quality. I don't use gyms but on the odd occasions when I have, they seem to be full of people wandering around strutting their stuff. I'm sure they would consider this time training time.

 

With any strength work I look to do no more than 30 to 35 minutes of actual work, excluding warm up, cool down, stretching etc. After this time the effectiveness diminshes rapidly. Generally this equates to 6 - 8 exercises of 3 sets each.

post #10 of 52

18-25 hours/week average,  down to 9-10 in the last weeks since the thumb tear.

post #11 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadianskier View Post

The time I spend depends on the season.

...  So assuming about 25 runs, we skied 75 to 100 minutes for about 38,000 vert on sl skis - was tired at the end of the day -

The time actually spent exercising while doing lift-served can in fact really add up...particularly on twitchy skis!  Not sure what it says about me on a snowboard versus skis, but for skis with traditional or semi-traditional sidecut, I find slighly longer sidecuts, but on a snowboard like to go to the short side.  I still have a traditional "big mountain" snowboard that is great for big turns, high speed, etc. but is just too much board for me to really ride several days in a row.

 

If you count hikes/hunting/paddling and other "fun" activities, I probably get in 15-25 hours/week on average.  The weekly mix can vary a lot.  Focus can change depending on upcoming activities -- a big one for me is if an activity like surfing is coming up.  That means I need to work on surf-specific paddling, which is different from swimming, as one example.  Ski and snowboard fitness stays with me due to year-round activities.   The main thing is dealing with injuries and also, lately, sometimes not doing some activities because at different points an injury would be more hassle than I want, either work-wise or because of other activities that I don't want to miss.

post #12 of 52

I ride my bicycle about 30 hour/week, not counting stops/breaks. Also do some lifting, boxes mostly. Neither with the focus and intensity necessary to improve my fitness... redface.gif

post #13 of 52

8-10 hours, depending on season.

 

Mizz Vonn does 56 hours a week, allegedly (in summer, at least)

post #14 of 52

I try to get in a minimum of about 5 hours a week.  There are some weeks when it's a lot more, like the week my son and I did a 40 mile backpack trip or doing long bike rides like the Coeur d'Fondo or STP.  During warm weather I mostly ride my road bike 4-5 days a week for at least 90 minutes each time and during colder weather I ride my mountain bike almost exclusively about the same number of days - weather permitting.  When the weather is really bad in the winter I bring the road bike in and put it on the trainer but I really dislike riding indoors and don't actually do it more than once or twice a week.  I tend to work hard skiing because I ski in the trees a lot so I generally lose a couple of pounds during the season.  I do some exercises with a medicine ball nearly every day also.  And try to get adequate rest and eat pretty healthy, mostly vegetarian.

post #15 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlugBootBlues View Post

8-10 hours, depending on season.

 

Mizz Vonn does 56 hours a week, allegedly (in summer, at least)

ya she sits on a bike for so long that she actually has breakfast and lunch on it... there are videos...
 

But those 56 include stretching and therapy too it's not like she lifts weights and run all day long.

post #16 of 52
Geez! I feel like a slacker. Seeing season approaching I have forced myself into my gym ( I hate gyms and working out! ). So I m probably doing bout 5 hours/ week to try to get into some sort of shape. About 6 hours more than usual! Getting serious about defending the class win I guess.

Btw, for those using a skiers edge, I have found hat ditching the poles significantly increases the intensity of the workout. I hold a medicine ball instead and it really increases the effort on the quads and the core, as well as balance. I found with the poles I was using them as a support
post #17 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp View Post

ya she sits on a bike for so long that she actually has breakfast and lunch on it... there are videos...
 

But those 56 include stretching and therapy too it's not like she lifts weights and run all day long.

For anyone that 56 is not sustainable long-term, even with the stretching and therapy.  The spinning underscores the importance of aerobic base for skiing -- even for racing, which is more intense than recreational skiing by far, aerobic base is far more important than most people realize -- but spinning also can be so boring that most people who don't get paid to ski are going to find it easier to stay with something that gives more direct rewards.

 

In plain English, something fun -- say MTB or tennis or golf (walking, carrying your bag), or spinning on a road bike somewhere pretty, for aerobic base.

post #18 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

Geez! I feel like a slacker. Seeing season approaching I have forced myself into my gym ( I hate gyms and working out! ). So I m probably doing bout 5 hours/ week to try to get into some sort of shape. About 6 hours more than usual! Getting serious about defending the class win I guess.
Btw, for those using a skiers edge, I have found hat ditching the poles significantly increases the intensity of the workout. I hold a medicine ball instead and it really increases the effort on the quads and the core, as well as balance. I found with the poles I was using them as a support

 

Agree.  I don't use the poles. 

 

Have you ever tried one leggers with boots on, in a tuck?eek.gif

post #19 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

For anyone that 56 is not sustainable long-term, even with the stretching and therapy.  The spinning underscores the importance of aerobic base for skiing -- even for racing, which is more intense than recreational skiing by far, aerobic base is far more important than most people realize -- but spinning also can be so boring that most people who don't get paid to ski are going to find it easier to stay with something that gives more direct rewards.

 

In plain English, something fun -- say MTB or tennis or golf (walking, carrying your bag), or spinning on a road bike somewhere pretty, for aerobic base.

Which is interesting because if you look at lactic acid levels in the blood, duration of exercise, and rest periods, race skiing sure looks like a type IIa and type IIx mix... so why so much emphasis on aerobic endurance? popcorn.gif
 

post #20 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp 

Which is interesting because if you look at lactic acid levels in the blood, duration of exercise, and rest periods, race skiing sure looks like a type IIa and type IIx mix... so why so much emphasis on aerobic endurance? popcorn.gif
 

Basically, the more you can do well on the aerobic side of things, the less you redline and the more you can maintain technique.  Redlining/ lactate breaks down your coordination...everyone at the elite level of skiing is talented...so other things being equal, those with better aerobic engines have a big advantage.  There are also advantages in training as well.  Guys with lots of degrees have published research on this stuff, but you can just look at Lindsey Vonn and her recounting of how she went for a MTB ride with Mancuso and was sucking wind, and realized that talent was only going to take her so far.  So, she got on a bike.

post #21 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

Basically, the more you can do well on the aerobic side of things, the less you redline and the more you can maintain technique.  Redlining/ lactate breaks down your coordination...everyone at the elite level of skiing is talented...so other things being equal, those with better aerobic engines have a big advantage.  There are also advantages in training as well.  Guys with lots of degrees have published research on this stuff, but you can just look at Lindsey Vonn and her recounting of how she went for a MTB ride with Mancuso and was sucking wind, and realized that talent was only going to take her so far.  So, she got on a bike.

specificity of training, there are other ways to reduce lactate and teach your body how to get rid of it/cope with it, that's all I'm going to say... 


I haven't finished my research yet, so no real conclusion, but so far I think there is enough to question the traditional way of training for race skiing.

post #22 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp View Post

specificity of training, there are other ways to reduce lactate and teach your body how to get rid of it/cope with it, that's all I'm going to say... 


I haven't finished my research yet, so no real conclusion, but so far I think there is enough to question the traditional way of training for race skiing.

Well, one problem is that it's not a "traditional" way of training for ski racing.  While there were similar approaches in the past, the current approach really starts with the Austrians not too long ago, and draws on modern sports science.  And this is not limited to alpine ski racing; similar sports likewise have similar training emphases. 

 

In terms of hours spent exercising per week, it's probably most relevant in that it means a day spent walking two rounds of golf, or hunting on steep terrain, can also get chalked up in the ski prep column more than people might think.

post #23 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp View Post

specificity of training, there are other ways to reduce lactate and teach your body how to get rid of it/cope with it, that's all I'm going to say... 


I haven't finished my research yet, so no real conclusion, but so far I think there is enough to question the traditional way of training for race skiing.

So we are back to PEDs? biggrin.gif
post #24 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post


So we are back to PEDs? biggrin.gif

Why do you think i was soooo interested in finding out more about aiding recovery through steroids? biggrin.gif

post #25 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

Well, one problem is that it's not a "traditional" way of training for ski racing.  While there were similar approaches in the past, the current approach really starts with the Austrians not too long ago, and draws on modern sports science.  And this is not limited to alpine ski racing; similar sports likewise have similar training emphases. 

 

In terms of hours spent exercising per week, it's probably most relevant in that it means a day spent walking two rounds of golf, or hunting on steep terrain, can also get chalked up in the ski prep column more than people might think.

I totally agree.
My problem lies in (IMHO) putting too much emphasis on traditional aerobic training. (hrs spent biking, running, etc.)

post #26 of 52

9-12 between weight lifting, plyo, biking.  plus nightly stretching/rehab stuff

post #27 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp View Post

I totally agree.
My problem lies in (IMHO) putting too much emphasis on traditional aerobic training. (hrs spent biking, running, etc.)

icon14.gif

 

For the average person, I think the 4-6 hours/day on the bike for purposes of ski prep for sure can be viewed as one more extreme thing that elite athletes will do to get an advantage.  For someone who realistically gets 3-4 hours of actual workout time per week which may be generous for many people's schedules, certainly I'd recommend something like inline or MTB for better prep than just spinning, though that's a movement skill and balance point in my case and not the conditioning point per se that you're making.

post #28 of 52
I think LV spends so much time on the bike to prevent getting bodyfat. She's also on a low-carb diet. Such diets reduce the insulin spikes that aid recovery, glycogen restoration, and muscle protein synthesis.
post #29 of 52

^^^No, keeping bodyfat low isn't the point, and in fact looking at sports where low bodyfat is a key to success, they do take other approaches to get it (not always wholesome approaches, but different ones).

post #30 of 52

Most years ~12-14 per week during the offseason (mostly cycling with some core and plyo work) and then maybe 2 hours per week during ski season in addition to 2 full days of skiing per week .

 

This year....0 hours spent on any exercise routine since July....guess I'll ski myself into some semblance of shape...pear shape mostlyeek.gif

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