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Recommendations for a low-maintenance Intermediate skier

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

So after skiing at only Breckenridge, Keystone, A-Basin over the years (5 times total - 1st time back last year after 15 year break), I'm looking to try someplace different for a solid week of skiing in late Feb/early March.

 

After last year, I'd say I'm a decent/safe intermediate skier although not comfortable in the bumps (look to improve in that are this year)

 

Looking for a place that will keep me entertained skiing for the whole week. I do like all the varied terrain of the Summit County area, but I'm looking for a less crowded experience. Not concerned with nightlife for this trip...It's all about the skiing. Not looking to go extravagant on accommodations, but ideally I'd like something walking distance or within easy shuttle distance to the slopes. I'm also looking to improve this year so a place with good instructors would be appreciated.

 

I know these questions get asked a lot, but maybe my requirements would reduce the number of possibilities to a more manageable number. I'm open to anywhere along the West Coast any of the ski areas out west and into Canada.

 

Aloha,

Mike


Edited by MikeyLikesIt - 10/18/12 at 7:35pm
post #2 of 20

Does "along the West Coast" include all of the Rockies?  I was just looking at the Ski Week that Taos offers.  Seems like a really good deal.  Definitely not crowded from what I can tell.  The combination of a few days at Bridger for private lessons and then some time at Big Sky slope side would introduce you to lots of fun intermediate terrain.  Bridger is non-profit so lift tickets and lessons are relatively inexpensive.  Being a mountain for locals, there is a lot of emphasis on having a good ski school.

post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 

Yes it does.. Guess I should of said ski areas out west :-)  Thanks for the info and I'll look into that tonight when I get home.

post #4 of 20

Sun Peaks

Silver Star

Big White

 

 

Perfect what you are looking for.

 

Also consider:

 

Panorama

post #5 of 20
Sun Valley would be a good pick for you. It's ridiculously uncrowded. It's perfect for someone that wants to stay on piste-they take terrific care of their groomers and there are lots of them. You can stay at one of the motels in Ketchum (there's a couple Best Westerns and a couple other motels that should be reasonably priced) without breaking the bank, and there's a free bus that goes to the Baldy base, which is all of about 6 blocks away. Ketchum has good restaurants in all price ranges and is an all around great ski town.

If you are going with someone, the Sun Valley Lodge has a great ski free package. I'm not sure
it's a good deal if you're solo.

The last few years we have gone the last week on February and have been happy with conditions.
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the replies. Checking out all the choices. Can't wait for the time to get here.

post #7 of 20

I'm kinda bias but Sun Peaks, B.C. should meet your needs. Check out the links in my signature.

post #8 of 20

I have to agree with Christy319 regarding Sun Valley.

 

If you are looking for a single resort with limited crowds and lots of terrain to work on improving your skills, SV has to be in the top 5. 

IMO - it has some of the best top-to-bottom cruising terrain in the west.

 

Getting there can be a challenge ... but that is what helps to keep the crowds down.

post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

Sun Peaks

Silver Star

Big White

 

 

Perfect what you are looking for.

 

Also consider:

 

Panorama

+1

post #10 of 20

A few off the top of my head:

 

Purgatory

Park City

Big Sky/Moonlight Basin

Sun Valley

post #11 of 20

I don't have a whole lot of experience with what you're asking for. But the fact that you will be there a whole week would make me think having more than one mountain to go to would be nice. I think Park City would suit most of your needs. All three resorts are 10-15 mins bus ride from each other and all have plenty of blues to get you going and then blacks to keep you learning.

 

If you don't mind doing a little planning ahead, a stay in Park City for your time of year can be had at a very reasonable expense, given the surroundings.

post #12 of 20
Big Sky. Good eats in the Huntley Lodge, just steps from the lifts. Almost never a crowd.

Wait until the end of March and join the EpicSki gathering!!!
post #13 of 20
Quote:

I have to agree with Christy319 regarding Sun Valley.

 

If you are looking for a single resort with limited crowds and lots of terrain to work on improving your skills, SV has to be in the top 5. 

IMO - it has some of the best top-to-bottom cruising terrain in the west.

 

Getting there can be a challenge ... but that is what helps to keep the crowds down.

Actually, if you can get to Boise fairly easily (there are nonstops from most western cities, and Chicago and MSP) Sun Valley's really not hard to get to. It's an easy 2.5 hour drive from the Boise airport, no mountain passes, no traffic and rare weather issues. In fact I think it's an easier drive than from DEN to Vail--you're far less likely to run into issues. 

post #14 of 20

Mt. Bachelor in Oregon is ideal for numerous reasons. It is huge with tons of long groomed runs. It has some of the best groomed snow around. It is at a lower elevation and generally warmer than most of the resorts mentioned in the Rockies so far making it easier to acclimate to for people that don't live in the mountain states. Its biggest drawback is its not near a major airport. You either have to fly into Portland and drive a few hours or fly into Redmond, Oregon which is a small regional airport.

post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio View Post

Mt. Bachelor in Oregon is ideal for numerous reasons. It is huge with tons of long groomed runs. It has some of the best groomed snow around. It is at a lower elevation and generally warmer than most of the resorts mentioned in the Rockies so far making it easier to acclimate to for people that don't live in the mountain states. Its biggest drawback is its not near a major airport. You either have to fly into Portland and drive a few hours or fly into Redmond, Oregon which is a small regional airport.

I think there is a bus from the Portland airport to Mt. Bachelor if you don't want to mess with a car.  There is a shuttle from the closest town to the base village if not staying on the mountain.

post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

Big Sky. Good eats in the Huntley Lodge, just steps from the lifts. Almost never a crowd.
Wait until the end of March and join the EpicSki gathering!!!

 

Wish I could, but work schedule won't allow it. Non-issue in 2014 ;-)

 

 

Thanks again for all the responses!

post #17 of 20

You've gotten some good suggestions, but I'm kinda surprised nobody's mentioned either Steamboat or Snowmass.  For a long time, I did trips with my family and those two places are VERY intermediate-friendly, plus more laid-back and uncrowded -- esp. Steamboat.  This may seem counter-intuitive, being big, fairly well-known places...but I've skied both a fair bit and never waited in line for a lift.  They have the added advantage of being bigger than a few of the other places mentioned.  Also, both places have strong instructional programs.
I don't think the other places are bad; I'd just suggest you think about looking at these two also.

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

I think there is a bus from the Portland airport to Mt. Bachelor if you don't want to mess with a car.  There is a shuttle from the closest town to the base village if not staying on the mountain.

I don't know anything about the bus situation, but there is no lodging at the mountain.  It's about 20 minutes away in Bend.  But otherwise Bachelor is perfect for what the OP wants.

post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post

You've gotten some good suggestions, but I'm kinda surprised nobody's mentioned either Steamboat or Snowmass.  For a long time, I did trips with my family and those two places are VERY intermediate-friendly, plus more laid-back and uncrowded -- esp. Steamboat.  This may seem counter-intuitive, being big, fairly well-known places...but I've skied both a fair bit and never waited in line for a lift.  They have the added advantage of being bigger than a few of the other places mentioned.  Also, both places have strong instructional programs.
I don't think the other places are bad; I'd just suggest you think about looking at these two also.

Did one trip to Steamboat with a friend as an intermediate back in the 1990s.  Liked it a lot.  Seemed to have a variety of options for staying slopeside.  Flew into Hayden so didn't need a car.  The town was easy to get to by bus for something different than the resort area.  The hot springs were fun.

post #20 of 20

Deer Valley

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