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New returning skier: rossignol s3 or rossignol experiance 76's?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Ok, I'm not a totally new skier, when I was 8-13 I skies yearly and was able to do most runs except some black and most double blacks. I recently moved back to jackson hole and am looking to get back into skiing. My problem is, I have no clue what ski to buy. Money is tight and I can get some rossignol s3's at my local shop for about $374. And online I found some rossignal experiance 76's for about the same price! Now I don't know about in the future but I don't intend on moving off the grommed slopes much... I know the 76's seemed like more of a novice-intermediate ski and the s3 seemed pretty open ended. So my question is... In your opinions should I go with the high ceiling on the s3 even though it seems to be more taylored for the freestyle powder crowd or will the 76's not really peak out performance wise for me because in just going to be on the groomed most of the time? I'm really floundering here.
post #2 of 21

I think 76 is too narrow for JH.  Try the Rossi Avenger 82ti.  I know several instructors who have them and they all rave about them.  I tried a pair one day and if I had been in the market for something that narrow I would have bought a pair, they skied very nicely.  They will do everything you want.

post #3 of 21

Hi, Givilanczz.

 

First off, welcome to EpicSki.  As a fellow JH-er, I'm glad to see you here.

 

I'm an on-mountain rep for Rossi, so you have to take my advice with a grain of salt, but I agree completely with mtcyclist.  I'd recommend the S3 for you rather than the Exp 76.  

 

JH gets lots of soft snow.  Especially if you'll be mostly offpiste, I really believe the S3 is the better ski.  It's a very versatile ski that handles groomers fairly well but really shines in soft snow, crud, bumps, trees, and chutes.  In other words, I think that if you're going to have only one pair of Rossignol skis in Jackson Hole, the S3 would be a very good choice.

 

PM me if you'd like to discuss it at length.

 

Again... Welcome to EpicSki.  There are several of us JH locals here.

post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Givilanczz View Post

I don't intend on moving off the grommed slopes much.

 

Bob, I think you missed something.  But, talking to Bob is a good idea.

post #5 of 21

Bob, actually, read his comment again:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Givilanczz View Post

[...] Now I don't know about in the future but I don't intend on moving off the grommed slopes much... [...]

 

He plans to primarily ski groomers at this point in time, not the other way around.  IMO, the s3 isn't a great choice for someone who will be on groomers primarily, however it does give a lot more flexibility and versatility if you do change your mind about that givilanczz.  I can't recommend the experience as I've never skied it, but if you're serious about sticking to groomers for now, I'd skip the s3.

post #6 of 21

As another JH local, welcome to Epic and have a great season getting back into skiing.  I agree with Bob that of the two skis listed, I would recommend the S3 far above the E76 for a JH ski.  I would also prefer to buy a ski locally vs one over the internet.  I know you said that you are not planning on going off-piste much.  I have heard that before.  If you have a pass and really plan on skiing more than a few days this season, you will be off-piste pretty quickly.  That's what we do around here.  

 

If you are on a budget, check out Headwall Sports over by K-Mart, they might have some good used gear that you might be interested in.  On those S3s'.  Are they new or demo with binding?  $374 seems about right for a demo and a bit low for a new ski.  There are some deals around if you check out the shops.

 

Have a great season!

post #7 of 21

Good point, mtcyclist, jaobrien6, and tpj.  I must be jetlagged or drunk or something to have missed the onpiste part of the post.

 

What's unusual is that I'm the one who is almost always recommending that people go "narrow" rather than "wide", but between those two skis for JH, I just think the S3 is a better choice.  IMHO, it really does ski groomers pretty well for a ski of that width.

 

Givilanczz:  Another option would be to go to the JH Ski Club's annual ski swap.  It's Oct 27 and it's a fantastic place to get deals on skis.  ESPECIALLY on skis that are groomer-oriented as that's a kind of ski that doesn't exactly turn on most people in the current JH environment.  There will be many, many knowledgeable locals who could help you pick out a good all-around ski from what's available at the swap.

 

Good luck with the search. 

post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaobrien6 View Post

Bob, actually, read his comment again:

 

 

He plans to primarily ski groomers at this point in time, not the other way around.  IMO, the s3 isn't a great choice for someone who will be on groomers primarily, however it does give a lot more flexibility and versatility if you do change your mind about that givilanczz.  I can't recommend the experience as I've never skied it, but if you're serious about sticking to groomers for now, I'd skip the s3.

 

If the choice is between the two skis the OP listed, then my clear choice would be the S3.  If the OP really plans on skiing groomers all winter and I think that will never happen, IMO he? would be better off getting something other than a E76.  I have never skied the E76, but see them a lot.  The E76 is a staple in the rental fleet here.  I think the E76 is a very solid rental ski, but would not recommend buying one to a fledgling JH local...  Someone might see you and get the wrong idea!eek.gif  

 

I think the OP might really like an E88 if they are committed to Rossi.  There are a lot of options in town right now.  For example I saw a pair of Dynastar Outland 80pro demos at JH Sports for $300.  In fairness, I am affiliated with that shop, but really don't care where the OP spends their money.  In any case, I wouldn't buy skis at a shop until after the ski swap later this month.  Get up early, stand in line, and pay the early entry fee.  It's all part of the ritual.  To do the best at the swap, know what is in the shops and what skis you are most interested in.  The swap is fun, but don't get caught up in the frenzy.  You need to have comparables and be ready to leave the swap and go to the shop quickly, because others will be doing the same thing.  It's not unheard of to see the stuff you looked at in the shop at the swap for a lot less.  

 

This town has a lot of skis.  Make sure your boots are set-up well and the skis will work themselves out.  

post #9 of 21

Yes, boots.  I completely forgot to even mention them.  Must be suffering from whatever afflicted Bob.  Boots are way more important than skis.  If your boots fit properly you can have fun on just about any ski, but if they don't fit properly your feet will hurt and skiing will not be much fun, no matter what ski you have.  Call Jackson Hole Sports and make an appointment to Stephen McDonald, Skiing-in-Jackson on here.  Get boots that fit.  Do not buy boots on the internet.

post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 
Wow guys thanks for all your great replies! I'm glad to see some jh locals here. Well after the thinking about it, I think the s3's are the way to go, I can support locally and to be honest I only skied a few days out of the year when I did ski and never really thought about t but I'm sure after a while going off the beaten path will be what I do. I am really very glad that you all have posted here and gave me some great ideas. My wife has never skied before in her life and wants to try, so any suggestions their would be awesome as well. I guess we will be seeing the locals at the ski swap oct 27!!!
post #11 of 21

Suggestions for your wife.

1.  Rent gear until she decides if she really likes skiing.

2.  Get her professional instruction from the beginning.  Do not try to teach her yourself.

3.  Do what it takes to make sure she is comfortable, mainly proper clothing: synthetics, merino wool, NO cotton

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Givilanczz View Post

Wow guys thanks for all your great replies! I'm glad to see some jh locals here. Well after the thinking about it, I think the s3's are the way to go, I can support locally and to be honest I only skied a few days out of the year when I did ski and never really thought about t but I'm sure after a while going off the beaten path will be what I do. I am really very glad that you all have posted here and gave me some great ideas. My wife has never skied before in her life and wants to try, so any suggestions their would be awesome as well. I guess we will be seeing the locals at the ski swap oct 27!!!

 

Are you planning on skiing a lot this season?  Depending on your schedule, I would look into a SnowKing pass.  They are cheap and you can ski after work for a few hours or even during a long lunch if you work in town.  There is no comparison between Snow King and JHMR, but The King can be really fun and it's deninitly affordable.  If you have a pass for The Village and time to use it don't bother unless you love night skiing.

 

I would also listen to "Trash & Treasure" on KMTN between 9:30-9:50am.  You can find anything there if you listen long enough.  Capt. Benny Wilson has had skis advertised for a while.  I have a pair of non-rockered Gotomas in my garage that might be good for you as a one ski quiver.  The local consignment shop, Headwall Sports, is getting geared up with winter stuff and the selection changes all the time.  I will probably go to The Swap just for fun this year.  I will probably go in the second hour and look for a used race ski.  There should be a lot of those.

post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I'm planning on skiing daily and often on the weekends. All of your suggestions seem really really helpful!! Thank you so very much guys. If you guys have any suggestions on instructors for my wife please let me know. We don't have a bunch of money but can afford a bit.
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Givilanczz View Post

[...] to be honest I only skied a few days out of the year when I did ski and never really thought about t but I'm sure after a while going off the beaten path will be what I do.

 

In that case I fully agree with Bob and tpj that the s3's are the right way to go.

post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Givilanczz View Post

Yeah, I'm planning on skiing daily and often on the weekends. All of your suggestions seem really really helpful!! Thank you so very much guys. If you guys have any suggestions on instructors for my wife please let me know. We don't have a bunch of money but can afford a bit.

The obvious answer for an instructor is me!biggrin.gif.  I am expensive for beginner lessons as they would have to be requested privates.  I believe that you get 2 free group lessons with a JHMR season pass.  There are some really good FDB instructors working the lower group line-up that wouldn't cost you any extra $.  Going early in the season, like the first 2-3 weeks, will probably get you a very experienced instructor (might even be me).  The most senior people start early season and take what they can get until things get rolling and the lower status people get started.  For a FDB, the early season is great because they will only be skiing on the easier groomed slopes and they will all be open in late NOV.  Then you have a jump on things when the rest of the mountain gets coverage and opens.

post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
Lol well how expensive are ski lessons? I'll need to talk it over with the wife. I'd love to spend the money to ensure she enjoys it. What is an average to expect to spend?
post #17 of 21

lets see....

 

how much are skis, boots, clothes, poles, helmet, gloves, packs, etc all purchased to go skiing....   and now you wonder if you can afford to learn how to ski? th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #18 of 21
Thread Starter 
More so looking not to get ripped of while learning how to ski.

I forgive you even though you've responded with an utterly useless comment.
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Givilanczz View Post

Lol well how expensive are ski lessons? I'll need to talk it over with the wife. I'd love to spend the money to ensure she enjoys it. What is an average to expect to spend?
 
 
 I just looked at the JHMR website and lesson prices are $130 for an all day beginner group lesson, 150 for the intermediate & advanced group lessons, $675 for an all day private (can be for up to 5 people), and $800 for the locals season program.

 

The locals passholder program is 10 days of all day instruction with the same instructor and group.  You can make your own group or get placed into one.  I know of a lot of long term groups with colorful names and even more colorful people and historiesrolleyes.gif.  You wind up paying $800 up front but get full day lessons with a very good instructor for $80/day with early tram access.  The early tram alone could make it worthwhile if you get one or more big powder mornings.  Here is a link to the locals program.  http://www.jacksonhole.com/local-programs.html.

 

Edit:  It looks like there is an option for attending individual SAT or TUES sessions for $95/day.  It looks like there will be at least 2 groups going each session, a slow group and a fast group.  Doesn't seem like as much fun as forming your own locals group but offers a good deal with less commitment.

 

I don't set the prices, I work for the school and don't do "lessons" "on the side".  I'd like to think that my school don't "rip people off".  I know I work very hard to help my students have a great day and feel like $150 is a fair price to ski with me for a full day.  When you take that a step further and realize that the $150/day is for a maximum group size of 4 students, the $675 for individual attention starts to make "sense".  If 5 people split that $675, the cost per person is less than the group lesson price.

 

Hope this helps

post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Ok so understanding that everyone's learning curve is different, what would you say the average amount off lessons needed before someone can ski comfortable by them self is?
post #21 of 21

They won't let you on the lifts at Jackson Hole with 76mm skis.

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