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SKS Multi Tuner Comments

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 

Does anyone have experience with the SKS mulit-tuner.  Good or Bad.

post #2 of 31

I don't have any experience directly with the SKS, but note that any multi-tuner is always a compromise between accuracy and flexibility.  If you desire greater accuracy then stick with a fixed angle edge guide and some diamond files.

post #3 of 31

I use the FKS Multituner to tune four sets of skis and a snowboard and it works fine.  If your anal about perfection and have lots of money for buying tools, spend the money.  I doubt that anyone could tell the difference in the results by skiing the finished product.

 

The expensive edge guides are easier and faster to use, no doubt about it.

 

As a point of reference, most of my friends think I am anal when I build something - I build airplanes for a hobby.

 

One of my good friends (who is not at all anal) claims that "perfection is the enemy of done".

 

YMMV

post #4 of 31

It was my first tool.  I had it for almost 20 years.  Last year I sent it to AtomicMan to test the accuracy and he said it was accurate.

post #5 of 31
Thread Starter 

Tnxs, bought mine from you (along with 3 diamond stones) have yet to try it.  Its definitely gotta be easier than hand tuning angles (which I have done in the past with gauge to measure).  I've taken mine apart already and the mechanism look solid.  In the next couple of weeks I'll check the angles too (Doing that just because I can).

 

Glad to see that no one as mentioned any serious pit falls to watch out for.

post #6 of 31

I have sold over 2000 of these and I have had people upgrade to fixed tools years later, but never had one returned for any reason.

post #7 of 31

Oldschooler,   I use the tool and like the results.  Ski between 60-90 days a year and ski my 4 sets of skis, wife's and quite a few friends.  Granted I go 1 degree base and 2 degrees side.  Beginning of year check and fix flat base etc. Use with file and diamond stones.  Use what is necessary based on what I have hit etc. I would say most skiers wouldn't know the difference on base being off a little, edge ditto.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There it is on my bench.

post #8 of 31

I have one and think you will be happy with the tool.  I don't race but have 3 pairs of skis in the quiver plus my wife's skis and son's snowboards.  I use this tool on all of them and works just fine.  I am running 1 base 2 side on some and 1 base 3 side on others.
 

post #9 of 31
Thread Starter 

Thanks, tried it old rock skis just to see how it worked,  Like to control and feel it will work well.

post #10 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post

Beginning of year check and fix flat base etc.

 

Pete, I would be interested to know exactly what you use/do to "check and fix flat base".

 

Also, what's the WD-40 for? Do you use it to lube binding mechanisms, or ??

 

Thx.

post #11 of 31

Based on my experience with the SKS tool, you're off to a good start.

post #12 of 31
Thread Starter 

Anything that makes life easier is a good thing.

 

I have access to a machine shop so generally If I need something special, well I go and play and make the parts.

 

jc-ski, I have been using a product called breakfree clp for the last 20 years as a lubricant when I need it.  For those that know what it is, likely know the history.  I swear by it.  The good thing is a little goes a long way.  Once used very little reapplication is need and it creeps into the cracks.

post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

 

Pete, I would be interested to know exactly what you use/do to "check and fix flat base".

 

Also, what's the WD-40 for? Do you use it to lube binding mechanisms, or ??

 

Thx.

 

I check the flatness of the base by using a Ski Visions metal true bar.  First check for base being edge high, get right down on the ski base and look to see if you see light through under the bar.  I will even lay a flashlight on one end of the ski and then you can really tell if you are edge high by the light leaking through.  Also use this same method to tell if ski is base high (skis being base high is very rare in my experience).  To flatten a ski I use a #12 bastard file and flatten base moving tip to tail.  Go easy with this file as it will really work.  All books etc. say use a #10 file but I like the 12 better.

 

Probably the easiest and most common way to discover your skis are edge high is when you scrape the was off with a plastic scraper and was doesn't come off somewhere on the ski.  If you are using the scraper from edge to edge this shows that you are edge high.

 

The WD 40 I use to clean the top of the ski.  Spray on a rag/washcloth and rub down the ski top and bindings.  Don't really like  WD40 for lube as it will gum up eventually.  Use Tri Flow spray for lube on bindings and most everything.

 

Hope this makes sense, if not call me on it and maybe I can explain better.

post #14 of 31

I find the side edge file position works pretty well, but I'm not sure I trust the device with the file in the base edge filing position. It seems raised slightly and I think I have to up the setting .5 * to get the one degree bevel, and I have difficulty not taking off p-tex and steel. anyone else use that function of the SKS Multi ?

post #15 of 31

Thanks Pete and OSS for your comments!

post #16 of 31

Question for you folks who use the SKS Tuner: The file that comes with it has a forward (direction) arrow - when you do an edge tip to tail with the arrow pointing at the tail do you then take the file out and flip it to do the other edge tip to tail, or do you ever leave it as is and work tail to tip? (I believe conventional wisdom is tip to tail always, but I'm pretty sure I've seen tuning howto videos where people work tail to tip.)

 

With stones (no angled teeth) do you still always work tip to tail?

post #17 of 31
Thread Starter 

I've had the chance to try it on a set of SL ski that needed some care.  Nice like how it works.

 

As to the file question, depends on what you are trying to achieve.  Initial rough cuts I don't worry about it, after that I go Tip to Tail, but thats just me.

post #18 of 31
I'm not the expert, but I thought you flip the ski and do tail to tip to use the same arm in the same direction with similar pressure.
post #19 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADKS View Post

I'm not the expert, but I thought you flip the ski and do tail to tip to use the same arm in the same direction with similar pressure.


You could flip the file in the slot if you wanted to file tip to tail direction only. 

I don't worry about it with the file as I do one more pass with a diamond that buffs it out pretty well. If you're racing, or maybe skiing lots of ice I'm sure it's a different story.

post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADKS View Post

I'm not the expert, but I thought you flip the ski and do tail to tip to use the same arm in the same direction with similar pressure.

  Tip to tail, tail to tip...that's how it's typically doneicon14.gif

post #21 of 31

Thx for the feedback. icon14.gif

post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post

 

TANGENT:  I use the lasso vice as well.  Why do you have the two end pieces in that direction?  Mine are arranged so I can put them in the edge holders, 90 degrees off yours.

post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDad View Post
  Mine are arranged so I can put them in the edge holders, 90 degrees off yours.

 

Sometimes, with real soft skis and especially nordic skis, scraping or brushing the tips requires extra support or the ski just flexes away from the brush/scraper.

 

(Of course PNI might have a different reason entirely).

post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDad View Post

 

TANGENT:  I use the lasso vice as well.  Why do you have the two end pieces in that direction?  Mine are arranged so I can put them in the edge holders, 90 degrees off yours.

 

Funny, I have the same exact vise too and I use mine 90 degrees from the way aligned in the picture - but I never use the edge holders to hold the ski sideways and always just work with the ski bottom facing up (also gave up on the string thing and just use rubber band type brake retainers). I also have to use a block-spacer made of rubber under thin skis so my side edge bevel tool doesn't hang up as I slide it past the vise, and seeing this "longways" alignment in the picture will now try it that way as it will eliminate using the rubber block-spacers. A picture sure is worth a thousand words - THANKS!

 

Also, in my experience RACEWAX.COM rocks!

post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDad View Post

 

TANGENT:  I use the lasso vice as well.  Why do you have the two end pieces in that direction?  Mine are arranged so I can put them in the edge holders, 90 degrees off yours.

 

The Dad.  Never use the edge holders and like the extra support for the way I have them set up.  9 out of 10  times I am just doing my skis.  As you might have noticed I have my bench mounted on a tool stand which I can access from either side, there is a small problem on tipping but I have two canvas bags with old tire chains in them to weight down.  I like this as I can scoot it out of the way if I want or take it apart and put in my loft for the summer.  I really like the cord cinch down versus the old rubber bands way of securing the brake.  I also use the cinch to secure the actual ski,  I press down on the ski and cinch it in tight.  Not only is the brake obviously retracted but it also really holds the ski in place.

post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post

 

The Dad.  Never use the edge holders and like the extra support for the way I have them set up.  9 out of 10  times I am just doing my skis.  As you might have noticed I have my bench mounted on a tool stand which I can access from either side, there is a small problem on tipping but I have two canvas bags with old tire chains in them to weight down.  I like this as I can scoot it out of the way if I want or take it apart and put in my loft for the summer.  I really like the cord cinch down versus the old rubber bands way of securing the brake.  I also use the cinch to secure the actual ski,  I press down on the ski and cinch it in tight.  Not only is the brake obviously retracted but it also really holds the ski in place.

 

No problem with tipping, but sometimes my wife yells at me when I'm using the edge of our glass dining room table to clamp to. I use the thick rubber bands that have the orange plastic eye hooks - bought thru  www.racewax.com

post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

 

No problem with tipping, but sometimes my wife yells at me when I'm using the edge of our glass dining room table to clamp to. I use the thick rubber bands that have the orange plastic eye hooks - bought thru  www.racewax.com

 

Yep I have the same band with hooks but only use when I am doing more than one pair and lay them all on my saw horses with the brake holders, they work well.

post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post

 

Yep I have the same band with hooks but only use when I am doing more than one pair and lay them all on my saw horses with the brake holders, they work well.


One of my ongoing annoyances are  brake retainers. I have not found a single type that works well on the different types of bindings on my skis (2 different Atomics, 2 Looks, 1 Tyrollia, 1 Knee) I have the those same hooks, ski big rubber bands, and broccoli/asparagus type big rubber bands. Invariably, sometime during the season (probably more often) one of them is going to come shooting off a brake often when I holding a hot iron or a file. I saw a fellow last year secure the bindings with a long piece of cord and a sailors cinch knot of some type and it seemed very fast and very secure. I'm thinking of switching to that.

post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsirin View Post


One of my ongoing annoyances are  brake retainers. I have not found a single type that works well on the different types of bindings on my skis (2 different Atomics, 2 Looks, 1 Tyrollia, 1 Knee) I have the those same hooks, ski big rubber bands, and broccoli/asparagus type big rubber bands. Invariably, sometime during the season (probably more often) one of them is going to come shooting off a brake often when I holding a hot iron or a file. I saw a fellow last year secure the bindings with a long piece of cord and a sailors cinch knot of some type and it seemed very fast and very secure. I'm thinking of switching to that.

My solution has been to short pieces of heavy copper wires found in typical #14 house wire.Strip off the plastic outer cover and it exposes the 3 wires inside. Cut pieces into 1 foot lengths.  Copper is very bendable, so I just wrap it around one break, over the binding and then onto the other break. Takes a couple of minutes to get it right the first time, but, once done, is very easy to put on and take off. The wire is sold by the foot in Lowe's or the Depot.

post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Living Proof View Post

My solution has been to short pieces of heavy copper wires found in typical #14 house wire.Strip off the plastic outer cover and it exposes the 3 wires inside. Cut pieces into 1 foot lengths.  Copper is very bendable, so I just wrap it around one break, over the binding and then onto the other break. Takes a couple of minutes to get it right the first time, but, once done, is very easy to put on and take off. The wire is sold by the foot in Lowe's or the Depot.

I'll give that a try. I take it that each pair of wires is then dedicated to a specific pair of skis. It sounds like a good solution. Thanks.

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