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Skiing 2011 Salomon XW Storm skis now...help me choose a companion for them in my quiver! - Page 3

post #61 of 79
Thread Starter 

Beating_A_Dead_Horse_by_livius.gif

 

Where would / could the Volkl RTM 80 skis fit in?

 

         biggrin.gif

post #62 of 79
Thread Starter 

Alright, this may drive a few of you bonkers but I'm going to ask anyway!

 

New developments - lot's of recent overtime at my job has caused me to buy skis and more overtime in the future has me planning one more - and I'd like it to be a logical choice.

 

So I'm hoping a few of you can help me choose my final skis...for a long time...and resist the urge to tell me I'm being illogical: overtime plus significantly discounted skis makes this not nearly as unreasonable as it seems.

 

 

I currently own:

 

 

Salomon X-Wing 8 skis (which I put up for sale.)

 

Salomon XW Storm skis (which I love and will use)

 

Salomon Rocker 2 90 skis

 

Rossignol Experience 88 skis (which, I got new for practically a steal, through my job perks)

 

 

So now I'm looking at either getting the

 

Blizzard Magnum 8.0 Ti skis

 

OR

 

a ski in the 98 to 108mm range...

 

which ought to have me finished buying skis for a long time - at least at the rate I have been getting them.

 

So, a more advanced carver for groomed mostly artificial snow?

 

Or a wider more floaty ski for those rare deeper days?

 

Chime in if you got a second!

 

PS - Sierra Jim, I may be coming to your neck of the woods in February for a week - airfare into Reno from New York is quite reasonable and I found a cheap place to stay in the area.

post #63 of 79
Thread Starter 

* accidental duplicate post

post #64 of 79
Thread Starter 

Come on guys, New England snow day ski?

 

Atomic Alibi?

 

Line Sir Francis Bacon?

 

Rossignol S3?

 

I may or may not get more skis this year, but it's always fun to discuss!

post #65 of 79

I am an eastern skier and during storms, I ski bluehouse districts 176cm (106 underfoot) , Armada TST's (183cm rockered and 101 underfoot), and just purchased a pair of Praxis powder boards for cheap(i can dream).  Earlier in the thread someone mentioned personal preference, and I agree.  I actually like the Districts better than the TST's, maybe because I have more powder days on them.  I am on Kendos as my DD 171cm.  They are too short for me at 5'9''.  I am selling the Kendos and the TST's and will be replacing them with Line P90's in 179. I feel like the TSTs are not much different from the Districts.   I am 37 and intermediate.  Can handle myself in powder.  Working to better myself in trees/bumps.  Working on keeping hands in the right position in front of me.  I am going to stop buying gear for now and start spending the $$ on lessons.  I feel that i have hit a plateau.  So some lessons are in order.  Let me also just state that I love gear, so NEED to stop buying it.  The reason why i tell you about how much i love gear is that it is somewhat of an illness.  You think you will be "all set" with your gear, but you will want/need something new.  It never ends. LOL

post #66 of 79

Why don't you get the Bushwackers? I don't think you can go wrong with them, given the description of what you want in a ski. They are perfect for intermediate to advanced and beyond up to expert. Also, I wouldn't be afraid of the Bonafides if I was a guy your size and athletic ability as you described - it sounds like you will become an advanced skier quite quickly. I just had a long discussion with a sales rep about this blizzard line - they are for the most part very skiable, which is why they are so sought after. You can't even find the Bonafides - sold out everywhere. I just bought the Black Pearls (women's version of Bushwacker). I was also considering some of the same skis on your lists - salomon rocker 2 90 and line prophet etc... Plan to use the BP's out west - local Vancouver mountains for night skiing and Whistler/Blackcomb which always has varied terrain and ungroomed areas. I think night skiing in Vancouver would be similar to back east skiing - cold cold cold, hard pack and icy conditions. I think my new skis will be able to handle it all - looking forward to using them!

PS. My previous skis were Salomon X-Wing 10's - kind of similar to your current carving skis. I really like my Salomon carvers too - they served me well the past 4 years. I was getting a bit frustrated with them up at Whistler/Blackcomb whenever there was a huge dump of fresh snow - they were not loving it. That's what brought me to wanting something more versatile and a little wider underfoot.

 

Sorry - I didn't realize until after this post you already bought the Salomon Rockers. FWIW I will leave my comment, since you still seem to be considering other options. 


Edited by Sharoski - 4/14/13 at 9:58am
post #67 of 79
Thread Starter 

I bought 3 pairs of skis this winter -

 

I was a little disappointed in two out of three.

 

Should have taken the advice - two were way too stiff and I couldn't flex and carve them - the others I skied like a hero on!

 

I bought

 

Salomon Rocker 2 90

 

Blizzard Magnum 8.0 Ti

 

and

 

Rossignol Experience 88.

 

Who wants to guess which ones worked for me and which ones didn't?

 

Regardless, I won't take a loss on them - I got them at a discount and after I own them a year I can resell them just under what I paid for them and try to make a better gamble next year.

 

They ARE fantastic skis - just not for me.

post #68 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

They ARE fantastic skis - just not for me.

 

That's what everyone told you repeatedly. I hope you spent at least the same amount of money on custom fitted boots. 

post #69 of 79
Thread Starter 
Boots are fine.

I just don't understand why I can get some skis to act like flexible skis - and other skis seem so stiff and have no give whatsoever - as though I have two pieces of solid steel under my feet.

Doesn't matter - I can sell them just under what I paid for them - I'll lose like $20 or $40 each...nothing.

Roll that money into some new Salomon Quest skis!
post #70 of 79
Thread Starter 
Knew I should have gotten those RTM 80 skis but people steered me away from them complaining about not liking rocker on front side skis.
post #71 of 79
Thread Starter 
Anyhow, I got 17 and a half days of skiing in Vermont, Maine and New Hampshire - not bad for a suburban New Yorker!
post #72 of 79

Hi twochordcool.  Welcome back.  It sounds like you had a pretty good season.  17 days is a nice showing for a weekend warrior living a few hours away from the mountains. 

 

I bet that you've made some made some progress in your skiing and have a better understanding of what we were trying to tell you last fall.  And I hope that you have learned that superficially "objective" magazine reviews and anecdotal reviews and hype on an Internet chat board are worth precisely what you paid for them (actually, the magazine reviews are worth less than $3.95, but it appears you were pulling your "data" from the online site, so it looks like you got it for $0).  The key takeaway should be that there are a lot of really good skis (far more good ones than bad ones out there) and the "best ski" for one skier may not be the best ski for another - sometimes because of feel-preference, sometimes because of relative skill and experience. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

Salomon Rocker 2 90

 

Blizzard Magnum 8.0 Ti

 

and

 

Rossignol Experience 88.

 

Who wants to guess which ones worked for me and which ones didn't?

 

I'll hazard a guess.  I think that you tipped your hand by showing interest in the '14 Sollie Quest. . . but I would have guessed that you liked the R290s the best of the bunch anyway.  But it doesn't matter what we think. . . what do you think and what have you learned that you can roll over into future seasons.

Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

I just don't understand why I can get some skis to act like flexible skis - and other skis seem so stiff and have no give whatsoever - as though I have two pieces of solid steel under my feet.

Roll that money into some new Salomon Quest skis!

 

If you sized them up right, it is a technical issue.  You are heavy enough to ride all of the choices above.  Don't be offended.  You are just starting out and it is what it is.  But as you improve and take lessons, you'll see changes in your skiing and ability to drive different skis.  Over the next year (after another 30 ski days), your gear preferences might change quite a bit.  Now you should see why some of us were trying to talk you off your interest in some of our personal favorites.  Just because a ski has received a chorus of praise and hype in these parts, the review may not translate to an intermediates experience.  The ski might be inappropriate for a particular skier if you don't yet have the technique to unlock its "versatility" or other praised attributes.  This is where info on boards like this can be helpful and actionable.  Last fall, I made the comparison to road bikes - where any fat roadie like me can perceive differences and awesomeness at the top end (keeping the wheel set constant) - and at the margin get a little faster.  Skis are different - skis designed for truly advanced skiers, whether it is a FIS racer or an off piste ski with rocker, etc. . . if you aren't ready for the ski, it will make you worse rather than better.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

Knew I should have gotten those RTM 80 skis but people steered me away from them complaining about not liking rocker on front side skis.

 

Now "here you go again. . ." 

 

You don't need any more skis.  This time take our advice.  Spend your ski budget on lessons, hotel rooms and plane tickets.  Double your ski days up in Vermont by staying over.  Amplify the experience with instruction.  Take a trip to a big western resort and then you'll see what folks mean when they talk about certain gear being better in that environment.  Don't pre-purchase more for that trip - you already have what you need. 

 

As for the RTMs, that is a perfect example of paying too much attention to data on the Internet without context.  Yes, it is odd that Volkl would design a frontside ski without camber.  And some on this board dislike the RTM series - but you need to understand their reasons and point of view to understand the critique.  But Volkl isn't stupid.  They know what they are doing and they test equipment before releasing it.  They know that it works.  And there are also plenty of positive reviews of the RTM series in mags and here (I know that both Mtcyclist and I liked the RTM84 a lot - fwiw, I was pretty impressed).  Ultimately, you've got to go with what you feel.  That's the only review that matters when you are plunking down your hard-earned cash.

 

But don't buy the RTM in the blind.  You already have a sub 80 carving ski, so the RTM is overlap.  Unless you demo'd it and know that it is prefect for you and will replace your storms as the firm snow day, groomer zoomer ski, don't waste another minute thinking about it.  It is way to early in your ski career to build out a quiver - which you should have figured out this season - but to the extent that you do run multiple skis, rather than collect every ski with a hot review, you need to think less about each ski's relative capabilities in narrow categories (they all should work in most conditions if you know what you are doing) and more about ski days - optimize broadly for the kind of ski days that you have, the conditions you see at the mountains you ski.  Focus on being covered for your typical ski days and you are all set.  That is why a R290 plus a E88 make no sense together except in a demo fleet.  You'd use one or the other for the same ski day.  I am sure that you had a preference - and for the ski day that is appropriate/optimal for either you'd choose your personal winner in the category every time.

 

Good luck and keep your focus squarely on the actual skiing.  I love to obsess over gear, I get it.  But once I make the call on which skis to ride and get out on the snow, it is all about the skiing, the snow, the terrain. . . . Unless you are a collector of sporting goods, that's what we do it for.


Edited by LewyM - 4/17/13 at 9:00am
post #73 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

I bought 3 pairs of skis this winter -

 

I was a little disappointed in two out of three.

 

Should have taken the advice - two were way too stiff and I couldn't flex and carve them - the others I skied like a hero on!

 

I bought

 

Salomon Rocker 2 90

 

Blizzard Magnum 8.0 Ti

 

and

 

Rossignol Experience 88.

 

Who wants to guess which ones worked for me and which ones didn't?

 

Regardless, I won't take a loss on them - I got them at a discount and after I own them a year I can resell them just under what I paid for them and try to make a better gamble next year.

 

They ARE fantastic skis - just not for me.

 

Hey 2CC, great thread, see some of my own quiver wants/thoughts in there which is quite entertaining. Anyway, on those Rossi E88's - what size, bindings, and price for them?
post #74 of 79
Thread Starter 
They are 178, with the recommended Axium 120L bindings. I will probably be asking for somewhere around $350 for them when I sell them. I must own them for a year and I must sell them under what I paid for them. I think I can factor in the cost of installing the bindings...which would make $350 just under what I paid for them.

They were brand new when I bought them and I had no more than 2 days on them.
Edited by twochordcool - 4/17/13 at 10:34am
post #75 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

Boots are fine.

I just don't understand why I can get some skis to act like flexible skis - and other skis seem so stiff and have no give whatsoever - as though I have two pieces of solid steel under my feet.

Doesn't matter - I can sell them just under what I paid for them - I'll lose like $20 or $40 each...nothing.

Roll that money into some new Salomon Quest skis!

 

When you say "boots are fine", do you mean they've been fitted by a professional bootfitter, and are snug with zero heel lift and immediate response in all planes? While boots aren't sexy, they are the biggest equipment factor in how well you ski. 

 

I just wanted to reiterate that you've got more than enough skis; most intermediates only need one pair of skis, especially when you're doing primarily groomer skiing. The skis won't improve your skiing; You'll get way more long-term ski fun by rolling that money into good lessons! 

 

Before making any other ski purchases (though you should be set for a number of years now), start demoing skis before you buy them. Most mountains have free demo days early in the season. Some mountains like Whistler-Blackcomb have free demos year round.

post #76 of 79
Thread Starter 
Boots are snug and comfortable without pain. I bought them at a ski shop that specialiised in skiing so I imagine they knew what they were doing. Even if they did not I think I did fine - they are a 90 flex, they are not loose, and they do not hurt my feet.

I won't go as crazy buying skis next year. At most I will sell the ones I bought and roll that money into more carefully selected skis. I'm not rich but I'm not poor either, thank God, and I can do this with the money I get from selling skis. The original money came from overtime at my job so no big deal.
post #77 of 79

Why the aversion to putting the money towards lessons?

post #78 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

They are 178, with the recommended Axium 120L bindings. I will probably be asking for somewhere around $350 for them when I sell them. I must own them for a year and I must sell them under what I paid for them. I think I can factor in the cost of installing the bindings...which would make $350 just under what I paid for them.

They were brand new when I bought them and I had no more than 2 days on them.

 

Argh, wish they were 186's. At 6',200#, I'm currently on 180's with traditional camber. If anything, I'm expecting those 88's to ski a tad short with that early rise. Level9 has them right now for $349 flat, so your price with only 2 days use and bound should move them no problem. Hey, besides all the reviews, basalt, tech stuff, etc., gotta love those earthy greyish-brown with cool light blue graphics eh?
post #79 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

So now to think ahead...

 

One more pair of skis to get before I'm done for a while!

 

Recap:

 

Salomon XW Storm skis 75mm / 168cm

 

Salomon Rocker 2 90 skis 88mm / 177cm

 

What would make it complete? Something 98mm...or even a little bigger?

 

 

[firefly]This must be what going mad feels like.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

I bought 3 pairs of skis this winter -

 

I was a little disappointed in two out of three.

 

 

No, THIS must be what going mad feels like. [/firefly]

 

Dude.

 

The first step is admitting you are not a skier.

 

What you are is a ski collector that sometimes takes his toys out of the box and plays with them. 

 

Why do I say this?

 

1. You are buying skis not because you like what is best in the category (hard snow/all mountain/pow, but because you just want to apparently own the category. You aren't even apparently demoing skis before you buy them, even though you admit that most of the skis you bought were a bad fit for you.

2. You have a part time job for the extra income and discounts to buy skis, but admit that this job makes it tough to actually go skiing.

3. You are buying and/or looking at buying skis for conditions you dislike skiing in (powder).

4. Your number of ski days to ski purchases is like 5 days skiing for each new ski.

5. You have totally ignored all of the other people trying to be very nice and point out how you could better spend your money if the goal was to actually ski better or enjoy skiing more (lessons, trips, etc.)

6. You have bought a rack full of skis, and have made plans for the next ten skis to buy, but when somebody points out your boot situation, you say "eh, they are fine." Bet you they really, really aren't- you would be like the 1 guy in 30 that as a beginner bought boots that have a good enough fit to perform well as an advanced skier.  The shop guy may know how it is supposed to fit, but he's not in the boot with you and has to go off of what you tell him, and almost all beginners still go for "comfy new in the shop."

 

Really, get a grip and dial back the ski buying, or just go whole hog, give up skiing, and open up a museum.

 

Two things are come to happen here.

 

1.  You will eventually become a pretty decent skier, and once you actually figure it out (where you can make variable radius carve turns, where you can ski powder and crud, etc), you will suddenly find that what you liked in a ski before is not the kind of ski that you like now that you are a skier.

2. You will suddenly find that out of your quiver, no matter how big it is, 95% of your ski days are happening on 2 skis- the hard snow ski and the soft snow ski. Because, they will be the skis you like skiing best, and you will be a good enough skier that it doesn't make sense to ski a ski you like less that is 5mm narrower in the waist.

 

For years, I've had a rotating quiver of about 4 skis I ski in a season, but every year its really the skis I like best.

 

This year, the 4 ski quiver is:

Rock Ski- skied 1 day on them this year.

95 waist ski- skied about 8 days.

105 waist ski- Skied about 15 days, am selling next season.

118 waist ski- Bought in late Feb, skied every day to the end of the season on them because they were my new favorite ski.

 

I expect about the same next year- I will have a rock ski that gets used once or twice when things are terribly rough, a hard-snow ski, and the powder ski that does everything else well enough to be my go-to ski (I live in a snowy place).

 

I am sure most quiver owners on this board will tell you the same- most of their skiing happens on 2 boards, maybe 3 for skiers that go places with extreme variations in snow conditions (you know the guys that actually take trips to go ski), and the rest of their quivers are older skis that get used 1-2 days a season for really outlier conditions or stuff like broken gear.

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