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How does the S7 hold up in its class?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I have the oppurtunity to get some new skis this season. My problem is that I don't know what I want. I am very happy with my current quiver which is...

 

188 S7

180 E98

172 Dynastar Contact Limited (getting retired)

 

I am pretty sure that I want to keep the E98. I also still like my S7s, but after 2 seasons on them I am wondering if I should replace them with something else. My issue with the S7 is that it is a bit soft and skis short. This is not all bad as I teach on them a fair amount and need to be able to do accurate slow speed demos for my students.

 

I can get Rossignol, Atomic, Salamon, Dynastar, Fischer, and K2 skis. I don't really want to go much over the 117mm waist thats on the S7. My thoughts are

 

188 Super 7

Squad 7

K2 Coomba w Tram graphic

Dynastar Cham.

Salomon Rocker2

Bent Chentler

 

I'm open to other suggestions. I like the Coomba as a BC ski possibly with a Baron binding. I have some skins that I can cut for a ski this size so it could be really good. The Coomba is about as narrow as I would want to go to replace the S7 because the E98 is almost as fat as the Coomba even though it is much stiffer. I have never felt like fat was the answer for powder and 105 is really all that I think I need. I would be skiing this ski mostly in-bounds and that means moguls, ruts, groomed, crud, and all of that. The S7 is versitle and can do it all for me. Some of the more hard charging options might not be as good for skiing with students at the resort.

 

My other thought is to get a replacement for the Contacts.  I will look for suggestions on this in another thread.

 

Thanks


Edited by tetonpwdrjunkie - 10/13/12 at 9:26pm
post #2 of 14

Some of those skis you listed are primarily for off-piste. I don't see why you'd want Super 7 or Bent Chetler for what you listed, those seem a bit too big. Even the S7 is primarily for off-piste as far as I know, but it seems pretty spot-on for what you listed. If you like it I'd stick with it, definitely wouldn't go any bigger/heavier. Don't put too much weight on this as I haven't skied any of the models you listed, just my thoughts. You also might want to edit your post with your height/weight.

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

My stats....  5'10", 175 lbs,  49 yo,  22 seasons at JH,  6 seasons as a full time instructor.  These days I mostly ski inbounds and off-piste.  I like steep chutes and trees.  I secretly like moguls, but never seek them out.  Moguls are a fact of life at the resort.  I teach all ages and ability levels, but my primary assignment is adult upper level lessons.  I teach a lot of level 8 and am working in black and double black terrain with students most days.

 

My gut is telling me that the Squad 7 and Chetler are probably too burly to be effective teaching tools most days.  The super 7 probably addresses some of my issues with the standard 7, but may lose enough in the bump category to not be an improvement.  I'm pretty good at my demos and can probably do them on most any ski, but have wondered how much the floppy tip and shape of the 7 influences what my students see.  

 

I am looking for info from people who have actually skied some of these models.  The 7 has been out for a while and I was wondering if there was something better that has come out more recently.  The Rocker2 looks a lot like a 7 and seems a bit stiffer and appears to have a "better" tail.  Sadly I didn't get after demoing skis last season like I meant to and will need to make a decision this season well before the mountain opens.

 

Odds are best that I will replace the Contacts and go with something less than 80 underfoot with some metal in it. 

post #4 of 14

Give the Patron a whirl. Haven't skied it yet personally, but all the ragers I know are raging about it. Might, just might set up a pair for teley skiing myself. Seems like a pretty safe, fun bet. 

post #5 of 14

Again not something I've skied, but from what I've read I would second the Patron. If you're looking at skis as big as the Chetler, Obsethed would be worth considering too (a bit smaller than the Chetler, bigger than the most of the other skis that have come up I think), but I'd still lean towards something a bit smaller like the S7 or Patron. If you do look at the Obsethed, it has changed a lot. The 2012 version is what I'm talking about, before that it was mainly a park ski.

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeganFreeskier View Post

Again not something I've skied, but from what I've read I would second the Patron. If you're looking at skis as big as the Chetler, Obsethed would be worth considering too (a bit smaller than the Chetler, bigger than the most of the other skis that have come up I think), but I'd still lean towards something a bit smaller like the S7 or Patron. If you do look at the Obsethed, it has changed a lot. The 2012 version is what I'm talking about, before that it was mainly a park ski

The 2011 version was the same ski...anyways, The obsethed is not going to be as versatile. Its got a lot of rocker and only a small amount of camber. plus the bases are too soft, but muchhhh faster, this thing is gonna be fast for the lack of camber. for a one ski quiver, its a good ski for someone who rips closer the expert level and gets a new ski every year or two. 

 

I have the patron also. but im giving it to my dad because of its groomer performance and more conservative rocker/camber/rocker profile. it has a small amount of rocker (perfect) and a lot of camber. super easy to ski. 

 

To the OP. If you like the pintail shape of the s7 go with the Squad 7. Its stiffer, lighter, and faster. it comes in a 190 so itll be a tad longer.

If you want to try something new and you like something thats stiff but still has some pop, go with the patron. its the best all around ski above 110mm right now. its closer to 5 dimensional than pintail. 

post #7 of 14

I know the Obsethed was a park ski until recently and was majorly changed. I thought it was 2012, but it could have been 2011.

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeganFreeskier View Post

I know the Obsethed was a park ski until recently and was majorly changed. I thought it was 2012, but it could have been 2011.

Dont get schizos. adjustable bindings are wack, why do you think theres so many leftovers on evo. 

 

I think i told you i mounted salomon sth 14 drivers. you gotta bend the break a bit. 

 

Mount them at traditional if you want a powchargering beast. +4 if you want to spin more.

 

They look sooo sweet tho. i cant wait to ski mine. they have so many reviews, and nothing bad said about them. Which is a lot better than more hyped skis with only 2 reviews that got paid to say "perfect"...your gunna be so stoked with them too. 

post #9 of 14

IMO, a BC/sidebounds ski is what you're missing. I'd keep the S7's, go for the new Watea 106's, which are very light, aimed at good skiers who want a non-lift served ski that can work on the way down. Even with a real rocker front, they seem to be fairly strong and traditional, in the sense that Blister repeatedly warned about how tough they were because they wanted user to carve well, while Real Skiers gave them the highest marks I've ever seen for a ski that wide, on same grounds, of course. Coomba's a classic, of course, and also probably $; I just am not a K2 guy. Briefly demoed a pair like 3 years ago, seemed very, ah, vanilla. If you like that Cham shape, then the High Mountain versions that are all wood seem to be getting good press. And have far cooler graphics, which is the real factor...

 

And in answer to your title, I think they hold up very well, thanks, for what they're best at: lower to moderate speed work in tight quarters, whether that's big soft bumps, chutes, or trees. Obviously, many very emphatic they've been passed by. But unsure by what; that part of the answer gets vague for those of us who need a close quarters ski that can handle everything decently. 


Edited by beyond - 10/14/12 at 1:46pm
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiSafe View Post

Dont get schizos. adjustable bindings are wack, why do you think theres so many leftovers on evo. 

 

I think i told you i mounted salomon sth 14 drivers. you gotta bend the break a bit. 

 

Mount them at traditional if you want a powchargering beast. +4 if you want to spin more.

 

They look sooo sweet tho. i cant wait to ski mine. they have so many reviews, and nothing bad said about them. Which is a lot better than more hyped skis with only 2 reviews that got paid to say "perfect"...your gunna be so stoked with them too. 


Did you mean to post that in my thread? I'm probably going with the STH 14 at traditional. I'm really excited, only problem is I live in Minnesota, so I'll just have access to anything but groomers once or twice all winter. At least I'll be living in the rockies soon, next year maybe. And yeah, the reviews are great. Anyway, let's stop derailing the thread. I agree with Beyond on OP lacking a BC/SC ski, I think OP is pretty covered for everything else.

post #11 of 14

The Super 7 is not a stiff ski and that's a big reason the Squad was developed.  I have been on the 195 cm Super since it first came out a few years ago.  Wanting a bit more float (I'm 6' 215 lbs) this year I decided to take a flyer on the new Praxis model called the Ullr.  Praxis does semi custom skis and you can choose your flex (soft, medium, medium/stiff, stiff) and as part of the process Praxis tested a Super 7 pair on their flex machine.  Somewhat surprising to me (and Praxis) it was in between what Praxis calls soft and medium; I went with the soft side of medium but still stiffer than the Super 7 (they will try to split hairs on flex if you ask).  As you probably know in the 188 size the 7 has the same dimensions as the Super 7 and my guess is that the 188 Super won't give up anything you like about the 7 but will fix the too soft problem.  Easy to get rid of if you don't like them.

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeganFreeskier View Post


Did you mean to post that in my thread? I'm probably going with the STH 14 at traditional. I'm really excited, only problem is I live in Minnesota, so I'll just have access to anything but groomers once or twice all winter. At least I'll be living in the rockies soon, next year maybe. And yeah, the reviews are great. Anyway, let's stop derailing the thread. I agree with Beyond on OP lacking a BC/SC ski, I think OP is pretty covered for everything else.

 

I have other skis than the ones I listed.  I consider my quiver to be 2 alpine skis and 1 tele ski because I can store 3 pairs of skis at the mountain so those are the ones I use.  I usually keep the E98 all the time and swap the Contacts and the S7 between my house and my ski slot depending on the general snow conditions.  I also share a snowboard slot with another instructor and can sometimes fit a pair of skis in there with my board for a short term thing.  I keep a pair each of alpine, telemark, and snowboard boots at the mountain.  Two pairs in my locker and one pair on the boot dryer above the locker.  I also maintain a pair of skis (Nordica Jet Fuels), boots, and poles at Snow King for patrol work,

 

At home I have a pair of Garmont Adrenaline AT boots with Intuition liners, custom footbeds, and booster strap.  For skis I have

 

Volkl Sumo w Duke Bindings & skins

Atomic (AT version of Tele Daddy) w Fritzie Freerides & skins

Atomic Tele Daddy w G3 tele bindings & skins

Volkl Gotoma (non-rockered) w Z12 alpine bindings

probably a few others, I would have to look

 

I like the Sumos OK, but they feel too fat and surfy, not to mention heavy for extended climbing.  The sumos also overpower my AT boot.  Both the Atomics (they are the same ski with different top sheets) are foam cored and light and ski well in good snow, but get pushed around a bit when conditions get weird.  Between these two skis I prefer the tele set-up even though I don't ski telemark in the BC anymore.

 

So I actually do have BC options.  I'm leaning towards replacing the Contacts and selling the Sumo set-up.

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

I came into a very good race-stock slalom ski.  Rumor has it that they were made for Bode, now they are mine.  I elected to take my annual ski this year as a Rossi E88.  Wanted something mid fat and all mountain.  I also wanted something that was a flat ski, because I will probably elect to put Hammerheads on it next season and use it as a tele ski.

 

Thanks for the advice.

 

Current primary quiver:

188  Rossi   S7

180  Rossi   E98

178  Rossi  E88

165  Head WC Slalom

 

178  Line Blend w Hammerheads

post #14 of 14

TPJ,

 

Congrats on the "Bode" SL's.  It will be interesting to hear if they are easily tamed. 

For the record, I switched from S7's to Super 7's last year, both 188cm's.  The difference was slight at best, may be slightly more stable & a hair less floppy.  Still just as playful & manageable, still luv em'.

 

JF

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