New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bindings

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hi All,

 

As I move on in age (now 63), I increasingly worry about ACL knee injuries.  I have Blizzard Magnum 7.6 with IQ TP12 bindings (!68 cm).  Does anyone  have recommendations on the new heel-release bindings that reduce risk for ACL injury?  I'm 5'8", 190 lbs. and about 6-7 level, almost exclusively front side. Thanks much.

post #2 of 14

Do a search on Kneebinding................ and get ready for days and days of reading............. many different views on these

post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michaelfahlund View Post

Hi All,

 

As I move on in age (now 63), I increasingly worry about ACL knee injuries.

Another approach is to learn about exercises that are most relevant for preventing knee injuries, especially those related to an ACL.  Bottom line is that strong hamstrings are a good idea.

 

Here's a simple example:

 

This website has a series of ski conditioning videos.  A place in Aspen that specializes in clinics for "boomers" born in 1946-1964.  (I have nothing to do with Bumps for Boomers.)  Found it wandering around the Internet recently.  I am a boomer a few months after losing an ACL, no intention of during surgery, essentially done with PT, and full intention to keep skiing.

 

http://www.bumpsforboomers.com/basic-ski-fitness-free-online-video-skiing-exercises

post #4 of 14

Well worth reading the safety tips put together by Vermont Safety Research a few years ago.

 

Tips for Knee-Friendly Skiing

 

One tip is:

"Don't try to get up until you've stopped sliding. Unless you are trying to avoid an obstacle or another skier, when you're down--stay down."

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yo Momma View Post

Do a search on Kneebinding................ and get ready for days and days of reading............. many different views on these

 

And, what is YOUR view?

post #6 of 14

Well ...........that's complicated................. I'll tell you this.............. I bought a pair a few years ago when they first came out. Quickly, many questions of quality began to arise as I tested them. Parts stripped on the binding and the teflon AFD's under my boot kept falling off................. I think these guys were on to an important innovation w/in the ski industry........... The bindings have been out for a few years now and hopefully they have worked out many of the kinks............... as a binding costing that much needs to be bulletproof. Some will get on here and tell you they have had no problems w/ them........... I had several problems w/ their first edition........... I think they released them too early and needed more testing prior to releasing them to the general public......... I hope that the latest versions of the Kneed binding are trouble free. Eventually I will buy another set, but not until I'm confident that they have a few years under their belts to work out some of the issues you will read in some of the posts.................. and also not until I see racers using their design............. when they get the racing community on board.......... I'll try them again........... IMHO.......

 

 

I do wish them the best and hope that they succeed. Innovation takes time and diligence. They are fighting an uphill battle in a binding industry that has some tough customers......... we have to be as that boot/ski interface can be critical to your life at times..........

post #7 of 14

Both Vermont Safety Research and I will tell you that one way to avoid ACL tears is to get your rump up and over your feet, rather than hanging it out to the rear, as about 90 % of skiers do.  You are thus less likely to fall back and to the side, the cause of most tears.  

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 

Yep....always good advice to get your ass in gear!  Thanks.

post #9 of 14

I have been using KneeBindings for the past 4 seasons, have 222 ski days on them, and have had many normal releases (toe releases and forward heel releases just like regular bindings) due to falls. I have taken them down the Tuckerman Ravine (steep), many mogul runs, and put over 100 timed race course runs on them. I have had ZERO (0) pre-releases, and one (1) lateral heel release that I am quite confident avoided a serious knee injury when I got tangled with another skier disembarking a chair lift. I am an early adopter that began using them 8 months after ACL Reconstruction from an injury that I sustained while skiing on Look bindings, and which I did not want to repeat. IME KneeBindings ski very well and have a tight connected feel providing great edge control. Here's me skiing on them late last season: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFjBqVO7uJE

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

I have been using KneeBindings for the past 4 seasons, have 222 ski days on them, and have had many normal releases (toe releases and forward heel releases just like regular bindings) due to falls. I have taken them down the Tuckerman Ravine (steep), many mogul runs, and put over 100 timed race course runs on them. I have had ZERO (0) pre-releases, and one (1) lateral heel release that I am quite confident avoided a serious knee injury when I got tangled with another skier disembarking a chair lift. I am an early adopter that began using them 8 months after ACL Reconstruction from an injury that I sustained while skiing on Look bindings, and which I did not want to repeat. IME KneeBindings ski very well and have a tight connected feel providing great edge control. Here's me skiing on them late last season: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFjBqVO7uJE

You forgot to re-report your original posts about the Teflon AFD's coming off............. you reported that this did happen to you years ago during their initial release............. it's interesting that you now leave that out as I consider that a major flaw especially when it happens mid mountain and midday............ Like I said........ hopefully they have or will work out the kinks......... I wish them the best and hope they succeed in getting world class racing support...........popcorn.gif

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yo Momma View Post

You forgot to re-report your original posts about the Teflon AFD's coming off............. you reported that this did happen to you years ago during their initial release............. it's interesting that you now leave that out as I consider that a major flaw especially when it happens mid mountain and midday............ Like I said........ hopefully they have or will work out the kinks......... I wish them the best and hope they succeed in getting world class racing support...........popcorn.gif

The first season I did lose a few AFDs from that first version of lifter plates, but the company immediately provided replacements and then upgraded mine and my family's lifter plates in time for the second season. We had 5 sets of bindings and I was the only one in my family that lost some AFDs that first season, from that first version with stick-on AFDs. However, that's ancient history as we have NEVER lost an AFD during the 2nd, 3rd, or 4th seasons using the updated lifter plates with molded-in AFDs. This is all documented in prior threads on this site, and not even applicable to the versions of the binding available now - and available for many seasons already.
post #12 of 14

I think they are on the path to an important innovation in the industry. Anything that increases safety is a good thing! :)
 

post #13 of 14

I assume the OP is aware that when you turn 50 your recommended DIN drops one skier level (ie a level III skier becomes a II).  Probably fine if you mainly ski groomers but if you're still skiing steeps, bumps, and deep snow you might be more concerned with prereleases. I've been 49 for 13 years.

post #14 of 14

Caution to all regarding claims supported by a person who 'congratulated' me immediately after a certain website was wrongfully changed by a 3rd-party, which wrongful-changes contain fraud.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion