or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Taos, New Mexico - Page 3

post #61 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinFromSA View Post

When I went skiing for the very first time, I really appreciated this sign. It's pretty intimidating for a first timer to look up at the mountain from the base. Taos looks a lot scarier to a beginner than it really ends up being. If anybody's worried about beginner there, remember what the sign says. "WE HAVE MANY EASY RUNS TOO!"

 


Very true...everything that you can see from chair 1 is absolutely frightening to the novice skier.  Even in the beginner area you have Raspberry Hill lingering above.  Some of the gnarliest wipeouts on the mountain occur there every morning when the bumps are the size of volkswagens and the snow is bulletproof.  Chair 4 is a fantastic beginner/intermediate lift.  A lot of wide open, gentle blues with a few really fun greens mixed in.  As much as I love ripping down West Basin, I always find myself lapping chair 4 at some point during the day.  36oz Optimators at the Bavarian don't hurt either beercheer.gif

post #62 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post

Good for powder days, not so good for getting steep terrain covered, which is the key issue at Taos.  Locals mention the "75-inch" rule for adequate coverage on the abundant steep terrain, and that figure is not often attained before Feb. 1.  So February/March are the safest times to go.

 

That weather reference may have said "Taos Ski Valley" but I'm fairly sure it's the town of Taos.  Not only for the 41F high temp average but if you scroll down that site shows max snowfall of 15 inches per month.  The snow plot at 11,200 averages ~45 inches per winter month and it's hard to imagine the base of the mountain being any less than 30 inches per winter month.

 

Beginners:  It depends on what the beginner wants.  It is absolutely true Taos has one of the top ski schools anywhere.  So if you intend to put yourself in their hands for an entire week you should make good progress.  But if not, there really isn't much beginner/low intermediate terrain for an entire week of skiing and most low end skiers not in lessons would find far more variety elsewhere.

 

The comments about the 20's being cold and being accustomed to midday temps over freezing are somewhat of a red flag in terms of implied ski experience.  I live in a ski region (Southern California) where this is true.  People at the local resorts here can sometimes get away with not having specialized winter clothing. Taos is colder than you might think from its latitude and you should prepare accordingly in terms of clothing.  A normal ski day will have highs in the 20's, lows in the teens and with very low humidity overnight temps in single digits are not uncommon.

 

+1

post #63 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post

Great time to ski Taos. 

 

Regarding lodging:  you have 3 choices.  You can stay at the Ski Valley, between the Ski Valley and town in the El Salto, Arroyo Seco, or Upper Colonias areas, or in town.  Lodging between town and the ski valley is in condos and houses.  I live in the Upper Colonias area and it takes me 20 minutes to get to the Ski Valley. 

 

If you want to stay on the south end of town, the Sagebrush is a good choice.  This location is the greatest distance from the Ski Valley.  In the heart of town is the Taos Inn, which is several old adobe structures.  It has a very good restaurant, Doc Martin's, and the Adobe Bar.  It is a very nice place, especially if you want local flavor.

 

Other good restaurants are 5 Star Burgers, Guadalajara Grill, Pizanos, Taos Pizza Outback, Orlandos, Grahams Grill, and a bunch of others.

 

While I have 2 4-wheel drive 4Runners, the chance you will actually need 4-wheel drive is remote.  I use 4-wheel drive more for mud than snow.

Make sure you go to Joseph's Table as well! Their Buffalo Burger is one of the best burger's I've ever had..

post #64 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by HippieFlippinNM View Post


Nope...totally false. Werners and RR never have good snow...ever! Don't waste your time venturing into those trees. : )

+1

post #65 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by ck675 View Post

Make sure you go to Joseph's Table as well! Their Buffalo Burger is one of the best burger's I've ever had..

frown.gif  Unfortunately, JT has been closed for some time.......

post #66 of 159

Here is a link for food in and around Taos.

 

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/597666

post #67 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoreFootDenver View Post

frown.gif  Unfortunately, JT has been closed for some time.......

 

 

Sadly true.  

post #68 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoreFootDenver View Post

frown.gif   Unfortunately, JT has been closed for some time.......

Are you serious? That's too bad. I really liked that place.
post #69 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by ck675 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoreFootDenver View Post

frown.gif   Unfortunately, JT has been closed for some time.......

Are you serious? That's too bad. I really liked that place.

The JT chef, Joseph Wrede! is now the executive chef at the historic Palace Restaurant and Saloon down in Santa Fe:
http://www.palacesantafe.com/

Good eatin'. cool.gif
post #70 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post


The JT chef, Joseph Wrede! is now the executive chef at the historic Palace Restaurant and Saloon down in Santa Fe:
http://www.palacesantafe.com/

Good eatin'. cool.gif

Que Bueno!

 

Daughter #1 is thinking about getting married in SF this fall. Will have to check it out.

post #71 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post

 

Beginners:  It depends on what the beginner wants.  It is absolutely true Taos has one of the top ski schools anywhere.  So if you intend to put yourself in their hands for an entire week you should make good progress.  But if not, there really isn't much beginner/low intermediate terrain for an entire week of skiing and most low end skiers not in lessons would find far more variety elsewhere.

 

 

You may still consider this to be the case, but FYI, Taos just opened up a new beginner area and lift (the Pioneer beginner area) which should help a lot....

post #72 of 159
The pioneer glade is a fantastic beginner area. Once a novice has conquered pioneer glade and strawberry hill, white feather (the easiest mountain green) should be a piece of cake. To defend Taos a bit, we may not have a ton of beginner terrain but what we lack in quantity we make up for in quality. IMO, Taos has the most exciting greens in the country. Honeysuckle, bonanza, and lower Patton are a few of my favorites. I'm an expert skier and I enjoy skiing these runs almost as much as I love hucking 50 footers off West Basin.
post #73 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by HippieFlippinNM View Post
 
IMO, Taos has the most exciting greens in the country. Honeysuckle, bonanza, and lower Patton are a few of my favorites. I'm an expert skier and I enjoy skiing these runs almost as much as I love hucking 50 footers off West Basin.

 

While I actually agree with this, I would argue that these runs would be considered blues at most other resorts, and therefore might add to the "tough" reputation that Taos has with beginners.  Struggling on greens typically doesn't instill too much confidence :-)

 

Seems most of the lessons end up on White Feather, which I think is the most dangerous and miserable run on the whole mountain!

post #74 of 159
^ the greens are like super g courses. Super fun for novices and experts alike, although perhaps a little intimidating for true beginners. As an instructor, I personally believe that Taos is a fantastic place to learn how to ski, especially now that the pioneer glade beginner area is finished. Because most of our mountain greens are so challenging, they demand that newbs develop good habits early on. Just my personal experience. Most of my students that are "never-evers" in the morning quickly become level 3 or 4 skiers by the afternoon. I credit this not only to my unbelievable teaching skills smile.gif, but to the challenging terrain that Taos is famous for. Like they say, if you can ski Taos, you can ski anywhere.
post #75 of 159

good info.

post #76 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by HippieFlippinNM View Post

Like they say, if you can ski Taos, you can ski anywhere.

 

+1.

post #77 of 159

It is all really fascinating, but is there any snow to ski anything at the moment? Looks like it is a really ghastly season so far. Scheduled to go there mid February and it is frightful how little snow Taos has gotten so far. Thinking about biting the bullet taking the loss and redirect to Kicking Horse.
 

post #78 of 159

Do any of you old silverbacks remember when they stopped hiding carafes of martinis around the Taos ski area for skiers to find?  I know it is unthinkable these days that a ski area would do such a thing, but Ernie Blake was a little out of the ordinary.  It was always one of my favorite old bits of ski lore.  I never found one back in the day but always wondered when they stopped doing that?
 

post #79 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallklutz View Post

It is all really fascinating, but is there any snow to ski anything at the moment? Looks like it is a really ghastly season so far. Scheduled to go there mid February and it is frightful how little snow Taos has gotten so far. Thinking about biting the bullet taking the loss and redirect to Kicking Horse.
 


Most of our snow comes in February and March.  You can never really go wrong with Kicking Horse but I think it is a little too soon to give up on Taos for mid February.  Last year, February 20th - 25th turned out to be some of the best days I had in 10 years. 

 

And about the Martinis, we still do it to this day.  Ernie would roll over in his grave if they put a stop to that. 

post #80 of 159

I had some 5 years ago, they were not hidden though but locked away in a designated box. Libations are offered at the end of the ski better week. I hope that the snow will come, although being at Taos and not skiing the West Basin is a shame. Hopefully will not happen now.

d

post #81 of 159

@ tallklutz

 

I've skied Taos every weekend in January this year.  The base is much better than the reported totals suggest.
 

post #82 of 159

Toda raba Sheleg,

Just came back from Bird/Alta, conditions are great and getting better every day. (hagada)

post #83 of 159

Lots of snow the past week, like 28 inches. Base is good and more stuff is opening up.

post #84 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoreFootDenver View Post

Lots of snow the past week, like 28 inches. Base is good and more stuff is opening up.

After the last storm we are now just about fully open. Kachina is skiing pretty well and I believe all of West Basin is open. The only trail that I know is definitely still closed is Pipeline off of Bambi (don't bother looking for it on a trail map). It is a really tough trail to open because the exit is super steep and boney and has a tendency to slide. Excellent run though when conditions are good.
post #85 of 159

Was there on Feb 14th to 20th. Had a blast. Everything was open and Kachina was skiing good. Blue birds everyday but no new snow, not one snowflake. The snow in the west basin and werner area chutes was still good. The day after we left a major storm and 3 feet of perfect dry snow hit Taos...Still coming back there in two years.

post #86 of 159

Snow at Taos?  Didn't think they got any snow except at the hill.

 

First time I went there my GF and I drove ~28 hrs non stop from London, ON to TSV.  We crashed in the Suburban overnight then skied the next AM. I about rode the chair right back down to the bottom after I saw all those dead and dismembered bodies strewn under the chair on that mogul run.....Al's run is that what it's called?  Does anyone actually ski that?

 

Coolest part I remember is hiking up Highline Ridge and skiing that face on the 5SV's I rented from the ski shop.  I owned Head Racing GS Radials at the time and I bought those 5SV's at the end of the day.  TSV was the first time I saw a dog ski patroler....a black lab I think it was. The only downer I recall is that the sun dips behind that ridge really early in the afternoon.  I think we also hit Ski Apache on that trip as well.

 

I went back to TSV the following year but I flew into Denver that time.....28 hours is a looooong drive.

post #87 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by rank View Post

Snow at Taos?  Didn't think they got any snow except at the hill.

 

First time I went there my GF and I drove ~28 hrs non stop from London, ON to TSV.  We crashed in the Suburban overnight then skied the next AM. I about rode the chair right back down to the bottom after I saw all those dead and dismembered bodies strewn under the chair on that mogul run.....Al's run is that what it's called?  Does anyone actually ski that?

 

Coolest part I remember is hiking up Highline Ridge and skiing that face on the 5SV's I rented from the ski shop.  I owned Head Racing GS Radials at the time and I bought those 5SV's at the end of the day.  TSV was the first time I saw a dog ski patroler....a black lab I think it was. The only downer I recall is that the sun dips behind that ridge really early in the afternoon.  I think we also hit Ski Apache on that trip as well.

 

I went back to TSV the following year but I flew into Denver that time.....28 hours is a looooong drive.


I think the dead body you are talking about is "Slim Slidel" and he is usually located at the top of Chair 2 whenever the conditions become icy.  He is put there as a reminder to self arrest in the event of a fall.  Much of our terrain in the spring becomes "no fall zones" because self arresting on a bullet proof, 55 degree pitch is fairly difficult. 

 

Al's is under chair 1 and yes, many people ski it.  It is actually the easiest black on the Lower Front because it is the only run with a single fall line. 

 

The sun does go down behind the ridge fairly early from December-February but by March it is out on the front side until the lifts stop running.  Best way to chase the sun at any point throughout the season...go immediately to the backside, ski there until 11, go back to the front side, ski there until 2:30-3, go back to the back side. 

 

Oh and the Lab patrol dog you are talking about is probably Riley...cute dog and still working. 

post #88 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by HippieFlippinNM View Post


I think the dead body you are talking about is "Slim Slidel" and he is usually located at the top of Chair 2 whenever the conditions become icy.  He is put there as a reminder to self arrest in the event of a fall.  Much of our terrain in the spring becomes "no fall zones" because self arresting on a bullet proof, 55 degree pitch is fairly difficult. 

 

Al's is under chair 1 and yes, many people ski it.  It is actually the easiest black on the Lower Front because it is the only run with a single fall line. 

 

The sun does go down behind the ridge fairly early from December-February but by March it is out on the front side until the lifts stop running.  Best way to chase the sun at any point throughout the season...go immediately to the backside, ski there until 11, go back to the front side, ski there until 2:30-3, go back to the back side. 

 

Oh and the Lab patrol dog you are talking about is probably Riley...cute dog and still working. 


Ok I think I remember that Slim guy.  It's been a while, but I think there were manaquins dressed up in ski gear that someone threw in amongst the moguls near the top of Al's.  Funny as hell.  This would have been circa 1999-ish.  If Riley Working he must be a supervisor by now. :)

post #89 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by HippieFlippinNM View Post


I think the dead body you are talking about is "Slim Slidel" and he is usually located at the top of Chair 2 whenever the conditions become icy.  He is put there as a reminder to self arrest in the event of a fall. 

 

 

Slim was outfitted by Burton when TSV opened for snowboarding.  Talk about detente.

post #90 of 159

Yeah I forgot about that whole snowboard thing.  I forgot how cool that place was.  Just a different drummer over there.

EDIT: I just took a look at TSV on 3dtrailmaps.com.  Does the right side of Highline Ridge really get to 45 degrees?


Edited by rank - 3/7/13 at 7:38pm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion