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Another Pair of Skis?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Hi Experts...!

I am an Eastern skier, age 63, 190 lbs., 5'10" and have always skied on the frontside.  But I want to make a start into off-pite powder.  Right now I'm skiing on Blizzard Magnum 7.6 (168 cm).  Should I upgrade to Magnum 8.3 or 8.8 (or Rossi or Head) so that I can carve as well as powder ski or am I ok with what I've got?  I want to make the powder training as easy as possible and am wondering if I need more waist width.  Thanks much! 

post #2 of 20

I am currently in love with the offerings from both Atomic and Blizzard, although Rossi has won some awards this year for skis I have never tried, hopefully someone else will chime in with their experiences. I believe your current waist is a 76 and for your height and weight (speaking from experience as we are the same give or take 5lbs) that is not sufficient for a powder day, at least to really leverage a ski's potential. I would recommend the Blizzard Bushwhacker in 180cm sizing. That is an 88 underfoot and great for someone starting to explore powder but still wants the all mountain feel. You can ski groomers on that ski no problem. 

 

I would reply with your rough skiing ability as that could change people's recommendations on skis and sizing. 

 

As an aggressive skier I prefer the Atomic Blog (185cm) which has 110 underfoot. The wider the ski underfoot the more commitment it takes from the skier to control them on groomers and lighter snow days. I am perfectly happy but if you are looking for a ski that you can go anywhere with I would stick closer to 88-98 underfoot. You should be on a ski in the 180cm range, that would ensure you have no problems floating.

 

Other great options are Atomic Access - great cheap entry ski that is much more ski than its price tag, Blizzard Bonafide - This ski is on my short list for this year or next, I did get a demo on them this past season. 

post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks alot, skitree;  as to level, I would say I have a good, solid technique in the low advanced area.  My age (63) stops me from being too aggressive... my muscles and bones aren't what they used to be!  Aside from Rossi's I like Head skis as well.

post #4 of 20

If you like Rossis, I would look at the Experience 98 or the 88. I have not tried them specifically but they have great reviews and I have been on the 83. I was very happy with the skis I did try and would assume with everyone else's good reviews the 88s or 98s would not disappoint. I am an ex-racer so I do prefer a stiffer ski but overall I found them to be a good balance for skiing all over the mountain.

 

As far as head's go, I was on their GS ski for a year and loved them. My brother also had the Head Richie 102, I naturally tried the ski and in my opinion it was a horrible ski when compared to the competition. Not sure if they have improved but I would shy away from them if your focus is on powder skiing. They were heavy and I fought to keep the tips above the surface.

post #5 of 20

If you're on a 76mm ski now, I'd suggest you make the jump to the high 90s at least to move into off-piste. Moving up 10mm isn't going to make a huge difference at 190 pounds.

post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimintokyo View Post

If you're on a 76mm ski now, I'd suggest you make the jump to the high 90s at least to move into off-piste. Moving up 10mm isn't going to make a huge difference at 190 pounds.


Agreed here.............. I'm in northern VT @ 200 lbs.......... my daily driver is Blizzard Bonafide........... or the Volkl Mantra as my "rock" ski............. both are in the high 90's underfoot and great at "Off piste East" :)............... playful in the pow but solid on the hardpack as long as it's not boilerplate...............

post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by skifree56 View Post

If you like Rossis, I would look at the Experience 98 or the 88. I have not tried them specifically but they have great reviews and I have been on the 83. I was very happy with the skis I did try and would assume with everyone else's good reviews the 88s or 98s would not disappoint. I am an ex-racer so I do prefer a stiffer ski but overall I found them to be a good balance for skiing all over the mountain.

 

 

I also like the Rossi's and currently use the E98 as my western all mtn ski.  but the E98 is a fairly demanding ski.  I think based on your description of your skiing that you would be better off with something a bit more forgiving such as the E88.  If you will be using exclusively on the east coast, I would consider the System version which comes with binding.  I like system skis for east coast firm snow skiing.

 

The E88 will handle just about any snow conditions we get on the east coast.  The Blizzard Bushwacker would also make a good choice, but I find the graphics too juvenille for my old tastes.  The new Blizzard 8.0 or 8.5 could also be a good choice.  If you are keeping you 7.6's (fine ski BTW) go 8.5, if you are replacing then 8.0.  For East Coast skiing I believe a versatle ski in the 80-90 mm range underfoot is all you really need.

 

If possible wait till the season begins and demo each and the answer to your question will become apparent.

 

Good luck,

 

Rick G

post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post

 

  For East Coast skiing I believe a versatle ski in the 80-90 mm range underfoot is all you really need.

 

 

 

80-90 is too close to what he already has............... For the OP's "powder training" anywhere from 96 -108 will give a much more playful experience in the east coast powder............. yes I said it........ East Coast and Powder in the same sentence!!!! LMAO!!!! :) .................. okay 2 days ..........maybe 3 of "Real Pow" .............. bring on the NorEasters.......... Hold the Rain please!

post #9 of 20

I still stand by that statement.  For most skiers, skiing primarily the East Coast if you are going to have only one pair of skis then you should be looking no wider than 80-90 mm underfoot.  The skis in this range are the most versatile and will handle anything short of an epic powder day.  Skiis in that width also tend to be a bit more forgiving which will help the OP learn some new skills.

 

Now if you are putting together a multible ski quiver, then a wider ski would be nice for those rare days when we get more than 12" of pow.  My go to east coast all mtn ski is the Volkl AC30 which is 80 mm underfoot and I have never wished for anything wider in any conditions I have skied those on the East Coast.  Out west it was a different story which is why I added a 98 underfoot for exclusive western skiing duty.

 

Of course YMMV.

 

Rick G

post #10 of 20

I have skied Magnum 7.6's in knee-deep snow out west...  they work (kinda), in the "everything floats if you get it moving fast enough" sense.

 

Contrary to popular belief, eastern powder does exist, but it's generally gone from the "on the trail map" stuff fast.  Or, as is sometimes said here in New England, "one foot of snow, two feet of wind".  Meaning all that snow got blown off the trails and now resides in the woods.

 

So a lot of eastern powder skiing is done in the woods.  Having a ski in the ~100mm waist width category allows you to float at lower speeds, and -- when you're in the trees -- being able to ski at slow speeds can be considered a good thing.

post #11 of 20
Thread Starter 

Maybe a more precise question is this:  Would I be better off trading my Magnum 7.6 for the 8.1, 8.3, or 8.8, given my new interest in trying a little powder (and I mean "a little"...say, 6 " or so)?  Thanks for your thoughts on this?

Michael
 

post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michaelfahlund View Post

Maybe a more precise question is this:  Would I be better off trading my Magnum 7.6 for the 8.1, 8.3, or 8.8, given my new interest in trying a little powder (and I mean "a little"...say, 6 " or so)? 

Michael
 

No. It's not a big enough difference. Time for a two ski quiver. Use the money to buy a 95/100 all mountain ski like the Bonifide or maybe something softer to noodle around in the trees. Mid 180 length.

BTW your 7.6 will work fine in 6" boot top on hardpack unless it's the death crust from Hell.

BBTW me also 63, 190, but 6'2"

post #13 of 20

Less than a 95 and you'll be missing out on a lot of fun! Yes you can do it w/ less underfoot...........but if you're getting new skis anyway, the latest generation wider skis are just so versatile and just downright fun.......... even in 6" (Correction: Especially in 6" or even 3")............. if you're looking to venture out......... time to start your quiver! :) Two tips I was given when learning pow....... stay centered.......... no need to lean fwd.............and bounce!.................. Bonus tip: Smile and Laugh! :)

post #14 of 20

6" of powder?  If that's all you expect to ski, you're fine with what you have.  I can ski that with my old Volkl Supersport Allstars(70mm waist) and they really suck in powder because they're pretty stiff.  Since you've decided you want to try powder do it first in 6-9" with your current skis.  Assuming you get used to it try deeper pow when you can.  Demo some wider skis during the season and if you really like it, buy some discounted fatter skis after the season ends.

post #15 of 20
Buy NOW!! Don't waste a season. Keep your old skis, get something 95 to 108. Still stuff out there from last years disaster. Go have FUN!!!
post #16 of 20
None of the skis suggested here will give you the powder training tool you need. All the 88-98 mm skis are one ski quiver compromises. You need a dedicated tool. I suggest something wide soft and double rockered. Rossi S7 would fit perfectly. Having a low ski in the East is an indulgence, but you only live once.
post #17 of 20
Thread Starter 

So.... what ski (Rossi, Kastle), in particular, would you suggest? 

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

6" of powder?  If that's all you expect to ski, you're fine with what you have.  I can ski that with my old Volkl Supersport Allstars(70mm waist) and they really suck in powder because they're pretty stiff.  Since you've decided you want to try powder do it first in 6-9" with your current skis.  Assuming you get used to it try deeper pow when you can.  Demo some wider skis during the season and if you really like it, buy some discounted fatter skis after the season ends.

 

As I said above, eastern powder resides in the trees.  You will never get enough "powder training" out on an open slope here in New England.  His Magnum 7.6's work in powder, but -- speaking from experience -- they require some speed to float.  If you're not floating, you're going to be skiing whatever is underneath (rocks, bumps, etc).  While dodging trees.  It's not exactly the ideal powder-learning experience.

post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post

 

As I said above, eastern powder resides in the trees.  You will never get enough "powder training" out on an open slope here in New England.  His Magnum 7.6's work in powder, but -- speaking from experience -- they require some speed to float.  If you're not floating, you're going to be skiing whatever is underneath (rocks, bumps, etc).  While dodging trees.  It's not exactly the ideal powder-learning experience.

 

 

THIS. 

 

A creamy 6" is plenty for a pow day if you have fatties, but it is short lived on piste- if you want to ski pow, you had better get in the woods and stay there.  I'd go somewhere in the 105-115 range for an actual eastern pow ski, and for God's sake get something that's going to be swively in the trees, don't get a fat GS ski, that's a waste of money IMO. 

post #20 of 20

You asked about Kastle or Rossi, try the Rossi S3................. 98 underfoot............. will be plenty for learning pow east coast............. S7 would be fun but might be too big a jump for ya to start w/..................

 

http://www.rossignol.com/US/US/s3-open_RA2SV01_product_alpine-men-skis-freeride.html


Edited by Yo Momma - 10/10/12 at 9:35am
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