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Warmest mittens?

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 

My wife has  problems with trying to keep her hands warm, she prefers mittens over gloves, can someone recommend a brand that will be the warmest? ( not sure if this is the right section for this?)

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Edited by Mojo1 - 10/8/12 at 5:24am
post #2 of 40

Hestra Heli Mitts are universally well regarded and very warm overall.  Not sure if they're the absolute warmest out there because I haven't tried every other mitt out there, but Hestra is highly recommended.

post #3 of 40

Black Diamond Mercury Mitt

 

I can't even think about wearing these untill it is well below ZERO

 

For more modereated folks, these should be just a damn warm mitt

post #4 of 40

My wife has some Hestra mitts as well. They're not the Heli. we bought them in Sweden and they came with an Angora inner glove. They're very warm even in Swedish conditions. I have the heli glove and that's a really warm glove. Hestra are used by the Swedish forces in the arcic. Not a bad recommendation!

post #5 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

Black Diamond Mercury Mitt

 

I can't even think about wearing these untill it is well below ZERO

 

For more modereated folks, these should be just a damn warm mitt

 

Yes. I have Hestras, too, and these are warmer. Hestras are less bulky, good warmth-to-weight ratio, but the BD Mercury mitts are crazy warm. I have also heard women swear by the Swany Toaster mitts.

post #6 of 40
Thread Starter 

Thanks for replies , after a search( should have done it before I posted) I think the Black Diamond Mercury is the ticket for her, but I will look at the Hestra’s also! The black diamond has outstanding reviews on here!

post #7 of 40

A glove liner in addition to the Mercury Mitt should be good down to -40 degrees.  The Mercurys run big, so consider one size smaller than you usually get.

post #8 of 40

A vote for Swamy Toaster Mitt.

I like the leather version (about $100) with the full zip around the mitten fingers and

the built-in fingered lining. Though the non-leather pair work well too.

You can add warmers on really cold days (I use toe warmers so they stick to inside of mitten, facing

my finger tops) or open zipper on warmer days.

Ideal for boot adjustments without exposing fingers to icey cold days, just by unzipping the mitt.

 

I have a bit of Raynaud's, so really have an investment in keeping the finger tips warm.

 

Just my .02Ct.

 

L.

post #9 of 40

My wife uses Hestra XCR and a polartec liner, no complains. 

post #10 of 40

Another vote for Hestra...but consider using an under armour or nike liner and a more basic mitten

 

Although I personally use Under Armour liners and Under Armour RAMIUS II MITT. The mittens are not warm by themselves but the combination is excellent. I have had all kinds of problems with my hands and warmth to the point where its a running joke among friends. I bought 6 pairs of gloves in 3 year window. This gives you the advantage of being able to take your glove off for a minute on the lift and not lose all your heat as well. 

 

The Swany mitts are great and well constructed but I tried them with no success. Completely viable for most people though.

post #11 of 40

A few companies are making heated gloves that work very nicely. A few have climate control built in so the glove gets hotter as the temp drops. I haven't mentioned any names because I actually haven't tried any in years. As far as I know the technology has changed quite a bit since I last put a pair on. Might be worth it to look into it. 

post #12 of 40

Make sure your wife is wearing a pair of silk glove liners, they help at lot!  and are cheap 14 - 30 dollars.
 

post #13 of 40

Outdoor Research (OR) offers some seriously warm (and expensive) mittens.  Check out the Alti Mitts and Mt. Baker variants.

post #14 of 40

My hands get cold because they sweat easily, so a good liner that wicks well is vital. Personally, I love the Polartec PowerStretch glove liners made by many different companies. They do an amazing job of keeping my hands dry, which is vital to their warmth. They are pretty thick liners (especially compared to silk liners), so you have to have gloves or mittens that provide the necessary room.

post #15 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

Black Diamond Mercury Mitt

 

I can't even think about wearing these untill it is well below ZERO

 

For more modereated folks, these should be just a damn warm mitt

 

I used the Mercury Mitts, and I really need them most of the time.  I have perpetually cold hands (one of the downsides of being an insulin dependent diabetic).  I'll use gloves when it warms up in the spring, otherwise I've got the Mercury Mitts on.  And sometimes I'll throw in a heat pack in each mitt as well (get a box at Coscto when they have them). 

 

Silk liners are just OK.  I recommend SmartWool liners, great on the really cold days.

post #16 of 40

I also use the Mercury mitts and they are too warm for me unless it is below zero.  The Smartwool liners are wonderful. Use in any glove too improve the performance.
 

post #17 of 40

Check these out.  I typed in "mountaineering mittens" and "expedition mittens" into google.  I'm thinking these are warmer than anything named so far.

 

http://www.valandre.com/eng/Sleeping_Bags_and_Outerwear/outerwear/ouralmittens.html

 

http://us.rab.uk.com/products/expedition-gear/expedition-mitts.html

post #18 of 40

Down mitts are warm but they compress easily and I found that they get cold when holding onto a pole all day.  In really cold temps I use Dachstein wool mitts with Hestra over-mitts (e.g. the Army Leather Extreme Mitt).  The boiled wool Dachstein mitts don't compress at all and stay warm even when damp, they are not too expensive and last a very long time.  My last pair lasted over ten years before I wore holes in the thumb.

 

see   http://www.bradleyalpinist.com/cart/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=42

 

I like using the combination of a wool under-mitt with an over mitt for touring too.  When climbing, I use the boiled wool mitt without a shell and it stays quite warm, even in the wind, and breathes very well.  My hands get cold easily and have been worse the last few years after multiple broken bones and dislocated fingers.  They stay warm with the Hestra/Dachstein combo.

post #19 of 40

The Mercury Mitts are significantly warmer than Swany Toasters.  I've owned both.

post #20 of 40
Thread Starter 

Wow, thanks for all the info, I had already ordered some glove liners, I know she has tried some before and didn't seem to help She does use the hand warmers a lot,below is the liners I ordered.They have a pocket for the warmers.I might get some of the wool liners also. I will pick up a box at Sam's before we head out on our trip. I have also been reviewing boot warms for her. I thought of the battery back type but may try the neoprene boot covers, they got really good reviews from what I can see. We bought her new boots last trip that seemed to really help from her feet hurting but she still needs more warmth!

 

 

Seirus Thermax glove liners 

post #21 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mojo1 View Post

Wow, thanks for all the info, I had already ordered some glove liners, I know she has tried some before and didn't seem to help She does use the hand warmers a lot,below is the liners I ordered.They have a pocket for the warmers.I might get some of the wool liners also. I will pick up a box at Sam's before we head out on our trip. I have also been reviewing boot warms for her. I thought of the battery back type but may try the neoprene boot covers, they got really good reviews from what I can see. We bought her new boots last trip that seemed to really help from her feet hurting but she still needs more warmth!

 

 

Seirus Thermax glove liners 


Neoprene boot covers.  Yes they help a little, especially if you have a drafty boot (not so much a problem theses days).  The main reason I wear them is to keep twigs and sticks from snagging a buckle and ripping off my boots!  (Curse you scrub Oak)

 

Battery Pack gloves and boot inserts.  These have gotten a lot better with the advent of Lithion Ion batteries.  I do not personally use them, but have many friends that swear by the foot beds.  I have not heard of anyone making a good pair of battery assist heated gloves,  not to say they don't exist.

post #22 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mojo1 View Post

I have also been reviewing boot warms for her. I thought of the battery back type but may try the neoprene boot covers, they got really good reviews from what I can see. 

 

I had Hotronic heaters and they did help for a season or two but eventually the liner was just too packed out for them to really work, plus a wire may have gotten broken.  What really made the difference for me was Intuition liners.  I bought a pair to get me through one last season in my old Tecnicas and last year bought Dalbello Krypton Cross boots that came with Intuition liners.  I haven't needed the heaters since I got those liners, even on the coldest days here.  That said, since your wife has Reynaud's something like the Hotronic or Thermic heater may be the only answer for her feet.  You could also try the chemical heat packs made for boots, just put them on the top of the socks over the toes rather than the bottom of the foot.

 

As far as mittens go, I've had Hestra gloves and mitts and won't buy them again, but my son has a pair of Hestra 3-finger leather race mitts that he loves.  For pretty much the same price Outdoor Research makes a vastly superior product, IMO.  I have their Alti Mitts for seriously cold days but mostly use their Northback gloves.  If she wants to use the heat packs, make sure she wears a liner because those things can cause burns if used right on your skin.

post #23 of 40

Merino wool liners are an excellent addition to a warm mitt.  They help keep moisture off your hands, they breathe, and they still work if they happen to get moist.  Beyond that, there are tradeoffs for dexterity vs warmth.  Hestras are very dextrous but perhaps not the warmest on the market (though they are very warm).  I suspect the expedition-class mitts mentioned above are warmer.  I prefer Hestra and they keep me warm (I have mild circulation issues at my extremities) but the others are probably warmer if you're looking for  THE WARMEST.

post #24 of 40

Mittens are one solution.  Another is to note that the body has a heat regulating system which tries to protect the torso above other parts.  If it senses that the torso is cold, it constricts blood to the hands and feet as they lose heat most easily.  But if the torso is too hot, it sends extra blood to the hands and feet to try to get rid of the heat.  So?  Dress more on your body with an extra sweater and your hands and feet will warm.  It sounds nutty but it works: try it. 

post #25 of 40

I understand that different people have different physiologies and have different causes and solutions for cold fingers and toes. (In my case, for example, my hands and feet always sweat a lot, without any regard to whether core or extremities are hot or cold. Therefore keeping fingers and toes warm for me is all about moisture control. Not true at all for many other people.)

 

But my attempt at a unique contribution here has to do with the subject's skiing habits. Specifically, I've noticed over the years that some people are inclined to treat skiing a run as an athletic endeavor, the same way they might think about going for a run, a fast mountain bike ride, or a game of soccer. This sometimes leads to skiing longer, more difficult runs - such as bump trails - with fewer "tea parties." Leaving aside the question of what impact this mindset might have on the social aspects of skiing, it does tend to keep its practitioners warm, because they really get their heart rates up and keep them up. So if the mitten wearer is prone to a lot of standing around outside, or if she tends to stick to low-angle groomers on which she skis fast (thus generating a lot of heat loss due to wind) without necessarily cranking turns that generate a lot of body heat, then that might be an area to look at. There is nothing like a non-stop mogul run to get really really warm all over. smile.gif

post #26 of 40

I used to get super cold hands due to a medical condition............. now I use these  http://www.handwarmers.com/id93.html

 

It's a wristband that holds a hand warmer next to the inside of your wrist to warm the blood going to your hands.................  I rarely ski w/o them.........

 

and Swany Triplex mittens, in combo w/ hottronics and boot gloves.............. cold hands a thing of the past................. and I no longer have to bulk up my midsection to keep my extremities warm.....

post #27 of 40

Another vote for the Outdoor Research Alti Mitts. My hands get cold very easily, and these things are awesome.

post #28 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadianskier View Post

Down mitts are warm but they compress easily and I found that they get cold when holding onto a pole all day.  In really cold temps I use Dachstein wool mitts with Hestra over-mitts (e.g. the Army Leather Extreme Mitt).  The boiled wool Dachstein mitts don't compress at all and stay warm even when damp, they are not too expensive and last a very long time.  My last pair lasted over ten years before I wore holes in the thumb.

 

see   http://www.bradleyalpinist.com/cart/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=42

 

I like using the combination of a wool under-mitt with an over mitt for touring too.  When climbing, I use the boiled wool mitt without a shell and it stays quite warm, even in the wind, and breathes very well.  My hands get cold easily and have been worse the last few years after multiple broken bones and dislocated fingers.  They stay warm with the Hestra/Dachstein combo.

I had a pair of mit liners just like those for years, they were super nice.   Just be sure to get the liners first then go and try on the mits to make sure they fit inside.  

post #29 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadianskier View Post

Down mitts are warm but they compress easily and I found that they get cold when holding onto a pole all day.  In really cold temps I use Dachstein wool mitts with Hestra over-mitts (e.g. the Army Leather Extreme Mitt).  The boiled wool Dachstein mitts don't compress at all and stay warm even when damp, they are not too expensive and last a very long time.  My last pair lasted over ten years before I wore holes in the thumb.

 

see   http://www.bradleyalpinist.com/cart/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=42

 

I like using the combination of a wool under-mitt with an over mitt for touring too.  When climbing, I use the boiled wool mitt without a shell and it stays quite warm, even in the wind, and breathes very well.  My hands get cold easily and have been worse the last few years after multiple broken bones and dislocated fingers.  They stay warm with the Hestra/Dachstein combo.

thanks, just ordered a pair for the wife and one for my daughter, they will make great christmas gifts! smile.gif

post #30 of 40

Anyone have a view on three finger gloves (e.g. Hestra Heli 3-finger glove, Black Diamond Lobster)?

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