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pre-season conditioning aimed at the muscles used on the uphill in skinning

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

I have never actually skinned,but I know that hiking uphill at Alta ,my hip flexors were very weak,and painful the next day.I think I am OK from mountain biking /squats etc for the hip extensors/calves/knee extensors but I really need some help on the hip flexors. I have a Nordic Track which I elevated to the max,engaging the forward portion of the stride much more. What works for you?

post #2 of 23

I usually just go out and have a light day the first day out. If you want to be well prepared just hike uphill alot. 

 

If you want, get some ankle weights at sporting good store.

post #3 of 23

Join a gym and just hit that StairMaster w/ a passion............. Don't forget to put duct tape over your mouth and a pin hole in it for breathing! :).............. Oh.......... and Yoga and or Pilates helps a ton...............

post #4 of 23

From a newbie at skinning. Tie a 10 lb. concrete block to each ankle and take a hike through the woods. That's what I feel on the snow. There is a technique, lead with your hip.

post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

I usually just go out and have a light day the first day out. If you want to be well prepared just hike uphill alot. 

 

If you want, get some ankle weights at sporting good store.

Just as a warning my mom is a personal fitness instructor and she has always told ankle weights are terrible for you. That put a lot of extra stress on the knees. think back to physics and levers. Although if just walking you should be okay it's a bigger deal for running

 

As a an alternative try hiking with a weighted pack. Only use plate weights if you have a proper pack, ideally u should only do this with a proper pack. If you must used sand or dirt in a regular back pack.

post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post

Just as a warning my mom is a personal fitness instructor and she has always told ankle weights are terrible for you. That put a lot of extra stress on the knees. think back to physics and levers. Although if just walking you should be okay it's a bigger deal for running

 

As a an alternative try hiking with a weighted pack. Only use plate weights if you have a proper pack, ideally u should only do this with a proper pack. If you must used sand or dirt in a regular back pack.

 

I am no expert, but I think this post is an example of how a little bit of information can be dangerous. I really don't see what a weighted pack will help with the hip flexor problem he is having. 

post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

 

I am no expert, but I think this post is an example of how a little bit of information can be dangerous. I really don't see what a weighted pack will help with the hip flexor problem he is having. 

I guess I slightly mis-spoke Your correct that walking with a pack won't target the hip flexors specifically but it will strengthen the muscles around them which can help the over stability of the region. 

 

I do tak a little bit of offense as to calling the information dangerous though. It may not be the exact exercise the OP was looking for but nothing about it was "dangerous" and I still stand by comment that using ankle weights can be harmful to you.


Edited by lonewolf210 - 10/14/12 at 11:47pm
post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wooley12 View Post

From a newbie at skinning. Tie a 10 lb. concrete block to each ankle and take a hike through the woods. That's what I feel on the snow. There is a technique, lead with your hip.


I dont know about a concrete block, but it does seem like  ankle weights at about the weight of boots+bindings +skis+ skins  would be a reasonable prep. and that could be about 10 pounds.

post #9 of 23

We have one of those elliptical trainer machines in the little gym in our community clubhouse.  I find that it simulates the feeling & motion of skinning quite well.  It has resistance & slope angle variations.  The thing I like most is that it is virtually zero impact.

JF

post #10 of 23

Duke, what is the exact problem with your hip flexor? Deep back squat should improve your flexibility significantly, but since you already are doing squat, I'm wondering if you have other type of muscle imbalance.

post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 

Divnamite:

 

My hip flexors are just weak compared to the rest of the leg muscles anterior and posterior because they do not get much use. I just know that hiking uphill at Alta in skis,or boot packing, they fatigue very quickly,and have an unpleasant soreness the next day.I just wanted to do something pre-season before I begin learning skinning to get ready.
 

post #12 of 23

Duke, I personally find lunges and full back squat improve my touring strength.

post #13 of 23

try doing clamshells. lay on your side with your legs pulled up to about 90*, place your hand on your waist to keep your hips vertical (don't let them twist). Lift your upper leg up while bent as far up as possible (clam shell, get it). You will feel a strong contraction in your glutes and flexors. Start off with 15 slow controlled reps, then you can add a weight on your knee to increase the resistance.

 

Another is to sit in a chair with legs bent at 90* (try to have them as much as perpendicular to your hips or even just below as possible), place a 3 or 5 weight on your thigh, lift your leg while bent (and back straight) up, you will feel this in the flexor and upper quad. it won't take many to exhaust your leg. Be careful with this one!

 

I was given these by my PT.

 

Clamshell- you can raise your knee much more than this dude

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=7mHdJRmtvo0

 

Here's a variation of the chair version with a cable.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wW1Zok5Apts&playnext=1&list=PL35B0B0B45EDCFAD4&feature=results_main

post #14 of 23

Errr, I just did 200 with 20lbs of kitty litter - not sure I'm doing it right??

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

 

Another is to sit in a chair with legs bent at 90* (try to have them as much as perpendicular to your hips or even just below as possible), place a 3 or 5 weight on your thigh, lift your leg while bent (and back straight) up, you will feel this in the flexor and upper quad. it won't take many to exhaust your leg. Be careful with this one!

post #15 of 23

my bet is you are not!  When the sitting version is done correctly, it will tire you out even with 5# if placed on your knee.

post #16 of 23

Nope...sorry...not getting the sitting-in-chair version then.

post #17 of 23

couldn't find video.... 

post #18 of 23

I've been inline skating this summer, and have gotten comfortable enough to start doing some road skating. Fortunate to live in an area with a long downhill (20+ blocks) all the way to the beach, with very wide streets that have light car traffic during much of the day, so there's room to make wide, sweeping turns. I'm spending most of my time on the green runs, nibbling at the blues, but waiting/beckoning if I ever get good enough are plenty of blacks and double-blacks. ;-)

 

Seriously, I've found the uphill stretches to be pretty good for building up strength and endurance, and then I can turn around and practice carving on the downhill. I don't think there's much isolation of the hip flexors, but I suspect overall skating uphill is pretty good prep for skinning uphill. Surprised it hasn't been suggested already...

 

http://www.biotecharticles.com/Healthcare-Article/Muscle-Power-Used-by-Inline-Speed-Skaters-980.html

post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
Surprised it hasn't been suggested already...

 

They're all getting tired of hearing me go on about it...

 

...and I confess I'm getting tired of "I can't possibly find the time or venue"-type responses from people who fully intend to spend significant time at less effective, even remedial methods.

post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

...

...and I confess I'm getting tired of "I can't possibly find the time or venue"-type responses from people who fully intend to spend significant time at less effective, even remedial methods.

 

Check.

 

Nordic walking / striding, roller skiing, etc. are also worth checking out.  You can do these along a bayou in Louisiana, at 0 feet above sea level, and get good prep.  Without all the gym hassle.

 

For gym-centric training programs, people need to factor in time for getting to/from gym, showered, changed, etc. -- these "slippage" factors are one reason why gym based training programs have a dismal long-term record.  Worse, those gym programs cost you all the movement skills you get from, say, inline skating, or even just running or striding up and down hills, that are also important.  The dropoff in soreness the 3d or 4th day out for most people is not due primarily to training adaptation, but instead due to better movement.  

post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

try doing clamshells. lay on your side with your legs pulled up to about 90*, place your hand on your waist to keep your hips vertical (don't let them twist). Lift your upper leg up while bent as far up as possible (clam shell, get it). You will feel a strong contraction in your glutes and flexors. Start off with 15 slow controlled reps, then you can add a weight on your knee to increase the resistance.

 

 

AND.   lie on side with lower knee bent for stability

           

           keep top leg straight (while keeping hips leaning slighly forward) lift top leg up and slighly to the rear (height is not the object)

 

            Do not roll hips/trunk forward or backward.  3 sets of 20 reps each leg.

 

The hard part is keeping your torso and hips slightly forward, the tendency is to roll your hip a little.  This is a hip flexor exercise which works very well.

 

Rehab gave me this exercise to do after a knee op and I had favored right knee all summer.  Speed and height is not the object Quality over Quanity

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

.... I don't think there's much isolation of the hip flexors, but I suspect overall skating uphill is pretty good prep for skinning uphill. ...

Wonder if anyone gave inline, nordic walking/striding, or just plain steep hiking a go for pre-season prep? 

post #23 of 23

Walking and hiking work fine.  Elliptical helps.  Start with short climbs (30 min -- 45 min.) and work up from there.  Keep in mind that skinning is not an uphill sprint.  Keep your traverse angles low and move a slow, steady, rhythmic pace.  Stop for a quick refuel/rehydrate every hour or so.  Wear as few clothes as possible.  Most folks I see try to go too fast and try to climb at too steep an angle.   It shouldn't hurt.  You don't want to be so tired that if you do have to move quickly that you're unable to do so.

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