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How would the DPS RP 112 fit into my quiver?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I have been doing alot of research here and on the net.  I have been asking about alot skis but it has been fun and I have learned alot.  I just bought a pair of 2013 Blizzard Bonafides 180 and am having them mounted.  I also own a 2010 Line Prophet 172's and 2012 Line Influence 105's in 179.  I live in Michigan but get outwest 8-10 days a year.  I am an expert skiier and lived in Aspen from '91-'94.  I'm 5' 6" and weigh 165.  I put up a thread asking about powder skis and really decided that until I can take a heli trip doesn't make sense to buy a powder specific ski.  It would be nice but not practical.  I guess what I am really looking for would be what is called "resort powder ski".  When I ski powder it is at a resort where you have to hike to the peak or find some stashes on the mountain.  A perfect example would be Highlands Bowl at Aspen Highlands.  With knowing this I started looking at some skis and found the DPS RP112.  Would this ski be a good addition to my collection?  The Rossignol Sickle looks really nice for what I am looking for as well.

 

Keep in mind I am not a hard charger.  I ski steeps, chutes, trees, bumps in the steeps.  Mostly steeps.  I don't bomb it I make lots of turns.  Really looking for a playful ski that will ski extremely well in powder and then as the mountain gets skiied off later in the day rip in those conditions as well.  I thought that was what the Influence 105's were going to be for me but last year on the last day of Aspen they got around 2 feet of snow and though the Influences were alot of fun they didn't excel in the deep stuff.  They worked excellent in crud and skiied off conditions but not the deep stuff.

 

Thanks,

 

Chuck

post #2 of 17
Don't worry about the ski fitting in. Buy a pair and sell the rest of what you have except for a ski you use in MI. They rip.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the reply.  Well every ski I own has a purpose so not sure I'd sell any of them but I guess if I got the RP I could make that decision.

 

1)Prophet 100 - tight hard bumps in Michigan.

2)Bonafide - Haven't skiied it yet but from what I hear it will carve up the Michigan conditions and be my out west ski in hard conditions and powder up to a foot.

3) Influence 105's - Does everything I want it to with the exception of powder.  The tips didn't seem to float as much as I would have liked in powder.  Will see were it stacks up to the Bonafide.  So far the Influence is the best ski I have ever skiied on.  Probably didn't need to buy the Bonafide I love the Influence so much but I'm a gear whore. LOL

 

So really what I need to fill a void is a playful ski that likes powder you would encounter at a resort such as Snowbird/Alta.  My plans this year is to take a trip to Snowbird/Alta or JH in early February and then I have a very close friend who lived with me in Aspen back in the earlier '90's who lives in Denver and has a condo in Breck.  He wants to to come out in March or April for 4 days.  So those are my out west trips this year.

post #4 of 17

What Cumberland said.  You will sell the Influence 105s.  You will compare the Bones and the 112RPs, decide which you like better, and sell the other.

post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by procos View Post

Really looking for a playful ski that will ski extremely well in powder and then as the mountain gets skiied off later in the day rip in those conditions as well.

 

This is essentially a contradiction so there's no ski that truly accomplishes this.  The very attributes that make a ski playful and surfy are somewhat the opposite of what makes a ski a crud buster that can just rip through the chop and hard pack.

 

Having said that, it is my impression (and limited experience) that the powder skis that are more charger oriented do a better job of being playful than the softer / playful skis do at charging / crud busting.  If that makes sense.  I would put the S7, Bent Chetler, Opus and DPS 112 in the former category, although I'm sure there are some DPS owner's who would disagree (but my list below has an obvious response).  Some skis that come to mind for the more chargy but still playful category...

 

Atomic Automatic

Salomon Rocker 2 115 (I bought these for this exact purpose)

Moment Bibby Pro

Moment Governor (bibby with a flat tail)

Line Influence 115

DPS 112 RPC (Resort Powder Charger)

Nordica Helldorado or Patron

Rossi Squad7

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

This is essentially a contradiction so there's no ski that truly accomplishes this.  The very attributes that make a ski playful and surfy are somewhat the opposite of what makes a ski a crud buster that can just rip through the chop and hard pack.

Having said that, it is my impression (and limited experience) that the powder skis that are more charger oriented do a better job of being playful than the softer / playful skis do at charging / crud busting.  If that makes sense.  I would put the S7, Bent Chetler, Opus and DPS 112 in the former category, although I'm sure there are some DPS owner's who would disagree (but my list below has an obvious response).  Some skis that come to mind for the more chargy but still playful category...

Atomic Automatic
Salomon Rocker 2 115 (I bought these for this exact purpose)
Moment Bibby Pro
Moment Governor (bibby with a flat tail)
Line Influence 115
DPS 112 RPC (Resort Powder Charger)
Nordica Helldorado or Patron
Rossi Squad7

I completely understand what you mean about chargers being able to be playful but not vice versa. I didn't know the Automatic was considered a charger though. Might look at the Governor never knew that about it. Thanks for the response. I really like what I have read about the RPS112 though.

Thanks,

Chuck
post #7 of 17
Chuck- with the risk of sounding smug I want to make a couple observations. You've asked a lot of questions here and on the Bones and they don't quite make sense. It looks like you don't quite know what you need, and are also willing to buy however many skis you need to satisfy the gear itch. Every ski you have will work for what you need just fine. It's somewhat ridiculous to dismiss a ski that you own on the base of one day. It's not a demo and I hope there was a reason you bought it in the first place. With where and how you ski, you are splitting hairs with any of the skis that people suggested, going more in detail is really a waste of time. You can't predict what conditions you will get on your trips West and all these skis gave enough all around performance to carry you through the day just fine.

By the way- are your boots in good order? Better put your money there. Sorry, man.
post #8 of 17

The Atomic Automatic is a more charger oriented version of the Bent Chetler with a skinnier waste and flatter tail.  Honestly, though, if I were you I'd wait until I got some quality time on those Bonafides, which will help give you some perspective towards other skis.

post #9 of 17

Not sure about smug, but I'm wondering if you just inherited a bunch of money and want to spend it all on multiple versions of a single ski that you'll only use 10 days a year. Keep in mind that the 112 - which I own - is only 14 mm wider than the Bone, and it's fairly stiff, although it definitely prefers soft fresh to heavy chop or stiff crud. It's 7 mm wider than the Line 105, can't speak to that ski's handling but I've heard it's no noodle. Also keep in mind that the kind of hiking you plan to do - which I enjoy also - really doesn't demand a super light or wide ski as much as it demands being able to handle the no-fall zones coming down. The best ski I've found for hike-to steeps at Telluride, for instance, are my MX88's. At Big Sky, with lighter snow, my BMX 98's. At Mammoth, with heavier snow, that would be my lamented old MX98's with all the metal in them. Sense a theme here (other than Kastle rules biggrin.gif)? Why don't you try out your Bones and see whether you really need anything wider? 

post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

 

This is essentially a contradiction so there's no ski that truly accomplishes this.  The very attributes that make a ski playful and surfy are somewhat the opposite of what makes a ski a crud buster that can just rip through the chop and hard pack.

 

Having said that, it is my impression (and limited experience) that the powder skis that are more charger oriented do a better job of being playful than the softer / playful skis do at charging / crud busting.  If that makes sense.  I would put the S7, Bent Chetler, Opus and DPS 112 in the former category, although I'm sure there are some DPS owner's who would disagree (but my list below has an obvious response).  Some skis that come to mind for the more chargy but still playful category...

 

Atomic Automatic

Salomon Rocker 2 115 (I bought these for this exact purpose)

Moment Bibby Pro

Moment Governor (bibby with a flat tail)

Line Influence 115

DPS 112 RPC (Resort Powder Charger)

Nordica Helldorado or Patron

Rossi Squad7

 

I endorse this post.

post #11 of 17

you're missing the K2 Side Seth.  fondled that ski yesterday. very cool profile and flex.....

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Not sure about smug, but I'm wondering if you just inherited a bunch of money and want to spend it all on multiple versions of a single ski that you'll only use 10 days a year. Keep in mind that the 112 - which I own - is only 14 mm wider than the Bone, and it's fairly stiff, although it definitely prefers soft fresh to heavy chop or stiff crud. It's 7 mm wider than the Line 105, can't speak to that ski's handling but I've heard it's no noodle. Also keep in mind that the kind of hiking you plan to do - which I enjoy also - really doesn't demand a super light or wide ski as much as it demands being able to handle the no-fall zones coming down. The best ski I've found for hike-to steeps at Telluride, for instance, are my MX88's. At Big Sky, with lighter snow, my BMX 98's. At Mammoth, with heavier snow, that would be my lamented old MX98's with all the metal in them. Sense a theme here (other than Kastle rules biggrin.gif )? Why don't you try out your Bones and see whether you really need anything wider? 

Thanks for the response. That is great advice. I didn't inherit a bunch of money I make my own living and it affords me to spend pretty much whatever I want on gear. I basically have GAS. Went through the same thing with guitar gear for about 10 years and have finally found what I love to use for playing guitar. So now I guess ski gear is taking it's place. I know I don't need more than one pair of ski's but what is in the harm of buying more? I am not saying you are this type of person but not sure why people are so judgmental on what other people spend their money on? If it brings me happiness it shouldn't matter if I own 50 pair of skis and don't even ski once. I thought this was a place to discuss gear with other like minded people. Not a place to be judgmental on what other people would like to purchase.
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

The Atomic Automatic is a more charger oriented version of the Bent Chetler with a skinnier waste and flatter tail.  Honestly, though, if I were you I'd wait until I got some quality time on those Bonafides, which will help give you some perspective towards other skis.

That is exactly what my plan is just picking people's brains so when I have the chance to demo I have a short list of skis to look at for a specific purpose.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

you're missing the K2 Side Seth.  fondled that ski yesterday. very cool profile and flex.....

 

I also forgot the ON3P BillyGoat.

post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

Chuck- with the risk of sounding smug I want to make a couple observations. You've asked a lot of questions here and on the Bones and they don't quite make sense. It looks like you don't quite know what you need, and are also willing to buy however many skis you need to satisfy the gear itch. Every ski you have will work for what you need just fine. It's somewhat ridiculous to dismiss a ski that you own on the base of one day. It's not a demo and I hope there was a reason you bought it in the first place. With where and how you ski, you are splitting hairs with any of the skis that people suggested, going more in detail is really a waste of time. You can't predict what conditions you will get on your trips West and all these skis gave enough all around performance to carry you through the day just fine.
By the way- are your boots in good order? Better put your money there. Sorry, man.

Not sure you are being smug. You are a member like everyone else and your opinions matter as much or little as anyone else's depending on who reads it. As for boots I have a great pair of boots. Just had new Super Feet orthos made last year. My orthos from 1996 finally crapped out on me last year. But thanks for the advice.
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by procos View Post

 I know I don't need more than one pair of ski's but what is in the harm of buying more? I am not saying you are this type of person but not sure why people are so judgmental on what other people spend their money on? If it brings me happiness it shouldn't matter if I own 50 pair of skis and don't even ski once. I thought this was a place to discuss gear with other like minded people. Not a place to be judgmental on what other people would like to purchase.

Point taken. But in all honesty, some of the reaction stems from the fact that you're talking about various skis that have overlapping missions. So it seems like redundancy to many. Also not sure the guitar analogy is a good one. I know musicians who play a 50 year old guitar, and the same strings they've used for years, and so on. Eg, they found a good one and kept it. But with skis, the technology evolves so rapidly that what rules right now may be fairly lame in 5 years. And the ski itself will go dead within 70-150 days onslope, depending on how you ski. So knowing that takes some of the pressure off us to find the definitive ski right now that we're going to keep foreever. 


Edited by beyond - 10/5/12 at 6:12pm
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Also not sure the guitar analogy is a good one. I know musicians who play a 50 year old guitar, and the same strings they've used for years, and so on. Eg, they found a good one and kept it.

I gotta call you out on this one. I am sure your musician friends very well might be playing 50 year old guitars because some of the best guitars were built during the '50's and '60's. However if they have any concern about how their tone sounds they wouldn't be using a set of strings that have more than 8-10 hours of playing on them. If you knew anything about guitar playing you would understand that having a set of strings on a guitar for more than 8-10 hours of playing time is like wearing a ski boot after skiing on it for 150+ days, packed out and unresponsive. Just saying'!
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