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Anybody ever compare the Armada TST to the Blizzard Bonafide or Cochise? - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by eleeski View Post

I really liked the TSTs. I demoed them on a powder day. Awesome in the powder. Powder doesn't last long at Squaw but it turns quickly into soft bumps. The TSTs were great there too. I didn't try Blizzards but the Rossignol S7 and Salomon BBR weren't as well suited to me as the TSTs. I liked the Praxis Backcountry skis I stole from a friend a bit better - maybe. But I would absolutely recommend the TST as one of your skis in the quiver.

Eric

I can see how you liked the TST's for your style of skiing and where you ski. 

The OP is looking for a good all mountain ski for Michigan 400ft vert hills that will travel well on his ski trips.  I wouldn't necessarily put any of the skis you listed into the must have list for him. 

 

Hope to ski with you again this season eleeski!

post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

The TST is a fine powder ski for someone who is timid and wants to have an entry level powder ski. 

 

Ouch! I agree it's not a powerhouse. (Yes, I spent a day on the ski.) But you obviously haven't seen my friend Dale, who's way over six feet and whose forearms are about as big around as my thighs ski his TSTs at warp 3 - his only speed, so far as I can tell - through any condition you might want to name, and have a blast doing it. He can ski on whatever he wants to, and he likes these. If he's an "entry level powder skier" then Chuck Yeager likes playing with balsa wood airplanes. Maybe what you are really saying is that they are more turny than someone who skis most of the time in areas where there are no trees might prefer. smile.gif

post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

 

Ouch! I agree it's not a powerhouse. (Yes, I spent a day on the ski.) But you obviously haven't seen my friend Dale, who's way over six feet and whose forearms are about as big around as my thighs ski his TSTs at warp 3 - his only speed, so far as I can tell - through any condition you might want to name, and have a blast doing it. He can ski on whatever he wants to, and he likes these. If he's an "entry level powder skier" then Chuck Yeager likes playing with balsa wood airplanes. Maybe what you are really saying is that they are more turny than someone who skis most of the time in areas where there are no trees might prefer. smile.gif

 

Warp 3? Why so slow? Haven't you seen the Next Generation? biggrin.gif

 

J/K of course. Actually this thread makes me more interested in trying the TST, not to mention the Scimatar as The One replacements. 

post #34 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

 

Ouch! I agree it's not a powerhouse. (Yes, I spent a day on the ski.) But you obviously haven't seen my friend Dale, who's way over six feet and whose forearms are about as big around as my thighs ski his TSTs at warp 3 - his only speed, so far as I can tell - through any condition you might want to name, and have a blast doing it. He can ski on whatever he wants to, and he likes these. If he's an "entry level powder skier" then Chuck Yeager likes playing with balsa wood airplanes. Maybe what you are really saying is that they are more turny than someone who skis most of the time in areas where there are no trees might prefer. smile.gif

Lets put it this way. 

The TST is an easy ski to control your speed when you're skiing powder and trees.  This makes it ideal for someone who's not comfortable with speed in trees and powder. 

 

Is that better? biggrin.gif

post #35 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

 

The TST is a fine powder ski for someone who is timid and wants to have an entry level powder ski. 

 

 

Hope you find this helpful. 

That is a very interesting comment. Nice to know I am timid. Thanks, you rockrolleyes.gif

post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Lets put it this way. 

The TST is an easy ski to control your speed when you're skiing powder and trees.  This makes it ideal for someone who's not comfortable with speed in trees and powder. 

 

Is that better? biggrin.gif


Really?  I think you should just jump out of the hole your digging. You recommend I buy a ski that I can't control when hauling assnonono2.gif  If you don't like the ski because it is easy to turn, just say so. The TST is one of the funniest skis I have been on.  I am just sad I didn't buy it in the 192ish length. And just read the whole thread. OP, listen to Beyond.


Edited by liv2 ski - 10/8/12 at 8:32pm
post #37 of 51
Wow... Tough crowd. Hope it snows in Coronado soon. smile.gif
post #38 of 51
Thread Starter 

 

Just thought I'd throw a picture of the Bonafides.  Very excited for it to snow.  Probably won't get a chance to ride them until the week of X-mas.  Can't wait.

post #39 of 51

Congratulation on your purchase - exciting to have a new set of skis!

post #40 of 51
Nice.  Let us know how you like them when you get out on snow. 
post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Lets put it this way. 

The TST is an easy ski to control your speed when you're skiing powder and trees.  This makes it ideal for someone who's not comfortable with speed in trees and powder. 

 

Is that better? biggrin.gif

 

Yes, much better. Thanks, TC. Good recovery. icon14.gif   Hope you know I, at least, was giving you good-natured grief, not actual criticism.

post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

 

Yes, much better. Thanks, TC. Good recovery. icon14.gif   Hope you know I, at least, was giving you good-natured grief, not actual criticism.

Sometimes I don't get my point across so well. 

All in all, there are a lot of good performance skis that have a sweet spot for skiers beginning to explore more of the mountain.  There are also some good performance skis that are demanding and not easy for someone to cut their teeth on.   TST is a ski that performs well but doesn't punish for mistakes. 

post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Lets put it this way. 

The TST is an easy ski to control your speed when you're skiing powder and trees.  This makes it ideal for someone who's not comfortable with speed in trees and powder. 

 

Is that better? biggrin.gif

Still getting yourself in trouble. wink.gif Anyone who's "comfortable" with speed in trees either skis your yawn "woods" out in the Sierra's, defined as big pines set 30 feet away from each other with nice level soft snow in between, or they're certifiable. Suggest put down the "timid's" and "not comfortables" and back away slowly. Get used to the idea that like taking a 20 mph corner at 35, not all definitions of risk taking are how fast you move in a straight line, and not all definitions of "control" imply loss of cajones...

post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

"woods" out in the Sierra's, defined as big pines set 30 feet away from each other with nice level soft snow in between

 

Is that a promise? Because if it is, I'm buying in. Sort like when it's March here and someone starts complaining about Sedona, or some other place where it's warm and dry and there are no clouds and mountain bikes don't need to be washed halfway through every ride so you can get the cranks turning again. I can understand why THAT person might be bored with his or her habitual conditions, but it sounds awesome to me from here!

post #45 of 51

"Liv2ski and Beyond",  (Beyond...what kind of tree's Jeffrey Pines, Sugar Pines? I need more specifics since this thread was about tree's...of wait...it was'nt....) Both of you need to relax and though I don't know "Trekchick", or either of you "Gentlemen", she's not attacking your abilities, as your both responding to in your own manner.

 

The TST is a no brainer pow ski..I own it - I've got 20 days on it in all conditions and yes in the Seirra's and beyond and go figure...in a variety of tree runs, chutes, etc....(though I did'nt measure any distances between trees) ..I'm 6' 210 and it holds a ton of speed on groomers, 50+ mph, but it is EASY and its a great entry pair for pow skiers for upper intermediates.

 

Yeah I can say and be fact based, as I'm an xracer, expert skier, but also humble enough to know when one of my pairs is indeed easy, entry level pow ski, when its the truth. The tip rocker alone on the TST matches or exceeds CM rocker on much larger pow ski's...again...turn initiation is brainless. (I call it my hangover ski) Does'nt mean your less of a skier.....when someone tells the truth.

 

She(Trekchick) gave ya a shot as well to back down and you actually dug yourselves in deeper.( In my view, which is all that matters.)

 

Its been several months and I normally would never respond to static such as this, but felt inclined to share "facts" that are backed up with ability and fairness.  

 

ps: Try the Katana's in a 191 for your nice tree runs you measure, should you want to make a statement...I have those too....

 

Ability is not measured by the ski, but the skier. Chill out.

 

Ok, enough of that...TST's vs. Bonafide's? Great question....

 

TST vs. the Bonafide: Different ski's all together. (I've skied both extensively) A. The TST is indeed an incredible ski to tear up the entire mtn. with "INCREDIBLE EASE" Allows for mistakes without any punishment and for myself, it does have a MPH limit on the groomers, even with the flatter tail...probably around 50mph on groomers, which isnt bad for that much tip rocker! The tips get flapping pretty well, however never a bother....still a super fun ski...but easy, easy, easy to ski everywhere.

 

Bonafide: I count not find the MPH limit on groomers on this ski. Took it out with the TST's over several days in Mammoth during the week, where folks are sparse......even starting out, you can feel the ski wants to take off, which is fanstatic...however it requires an experts touch in the tree's and chutes, loose, chopped up snow and rewards plenty when managed as such. Great power to crush crud... On the groomers, there is not another ski I have found, other than the Mantra, (slightly stiffer) that will hold at a high MPH over 90 waist category.

 

Cheers

post #46 of 51

PS: One small edit...I would'nt call the TST a pow ski - too narrow,...though it does just fine with the banana tips in the pow, there are so many other skis with more width and capabilities which are true pow skis. TST's are easy turning, all mountain ski's. My humble two cents.

post #47 of 51

I skied all 3 back to back.  

 

TST: playful, fun, quick, best in bumps of the 3.

Bonafide: more stable, more powerful, bit turn feel, too stiff in tight spaces for me.

Cochise: Bonafide basically, just wider

 

I would much prefer the TST in trees and bumps.  I would prefer the Bonafide or Cochise in bigger turns at speed, or like in a freeride comp situation.  Grip is massive for wider skis.  Both can be a handful at speed in tight trees though (Kabookie is my favorite Blizzard wider ski, it is way more forgiving in trees). 

post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Lets put it this way. 

The TST is an easy ski to control your speed when you're skiing powder and trees.  This makes it ideal for someone who's not comfortable with speed in trees and powder. 

 

Is that better? biggrin.gif

 

 

And if you don't weigh much.  All 3 of the guys I ski with on a regular basis, who are very good skiers (race background, can rip trees at scary speeds) and are better than all but 2 skiers I have skied with on this board, thought the full-metal Blizzards were too stiff for trees and bumps.  All 3 guys really liked my Kabookies, which is a softer version of the Bonafide, and much closer to the TST, although the TST is more playful in the tail and not quite the same feel of the Kabookie, so it is probably the more worthy comparison.  Either that, or the Head Inferno from last year: that is like a TST but has more stability and power underfoot. 

post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

 

 

And if you don't weigh much.  All 3 of the guys I ski with on a regular basis, who are very good skiers (race background, can rip trees at scary speeds) and are better than all but 2 skiers I have skied with on this board, thought the full-metal Blizzards were too stiff for trees and bumps.  All 3 guys really liked my Kabookies, which is a softer version of the Bonafide, and much closer to the TST, although the TST is more playful in the tail and not quite the same feel of the Kabookie, so it is probably the more worthy comparison.  Either that, or the Head Inferno from last year: that is like a TST but has more stability and power underfoot. 

 

I didn't like the bones in trees either. And I am talking in the trees like where you are scraping branches and can see at most 20' ahead of you - not skiing through the trees where the trees are 30' apart. 

 

I don't understand or agree with TCs earlier comment. In truth - if you are an expert who is on his/her game - any ski will work and for that matter you already know what works for you in the conditions you prefer. For people  who don't  want to work so hard - those of us who actually need to think about what ski to take - big mountain/freeride skis (like the bone) are not efficient skis in tight spots with lots of short turns and you have to work alot harder to ski them compared to softer more so called "forgiving" options that can actually decamber and hook up smoothyl in soft snow in a short turn at a lower speed ... 


Edited by tromano - 1/7/13 at 5:49am
post #50 of 51

I agree that the Cochise are a bit too stiff in tight trees - that's the only time they feel "planky" to me.  Which makes sense considering how they handle in open bowls.

post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

 

I didn't like the bones in trees either. And I am talking in the trees like where you are scraping branches and can see at most 20' ahead of you - not skiing through the trees where the trees are 30' apart. 

 

I don't understand or agree with TCs earlier comment. In truth - if you are an expert who is on his/her game - any ski will work and for that matter you already know what works for you in the conditions you prefer. For people  who don't  want to work so hard - those of us who actually need to think about what ski to take - big mountain/freeride skis (like the bone) are not efficient skis in tight spots with lots of short turns and you have to work alot harder to ski them compared to softer more so called "forgiving" options that can actually decamber and hook up smoothyl in soft snow in a short turn at a lower speed ... 

yeah, that is pretty much true  of any of the pro freeride/comp style skis I have been on. Great in open spaces; big mountains and comps aren't skied inside a dense fir stand. I remember the old Dynastar Legend Pro (one of the first true big-mountain skis) was the same deal, as was the Stockli Scot Schmidt.   I like a softer ski in those tight spaces: it allows me to feel like I can pull my feet back aggressively and get the ski to re-direct in a hurry, which I struggle to do on a ski with a really stiff tip, just like a stiffer ski is better in big turns, rough snow, at speed.    

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