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Do I need bindings with higher din settings

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Greetings,

 

This is my first post, as I'm hoping to get a better idea if I made a mistake with my recent purchase.  I recently bought skis with salomon z10 bindings (3-10 din).  According to the din settings table, I should be at about 7.5 - 8, so, on the surface, the included bindings look like they should work.  However, there are multiple discussions how people need or like to have din 14 and higher bindings, so I'm beginning to doubt whether my bindings will be ok.  Also, z10 bindings are sometimes described as designed for women or lighter skiers, which makes me doubt my purchase evern more.  Looking for more experienced folks to chime in / provide feedback.

 

I'm 6'1", 210-215 lbs, boot size 26.5, an intermediate (skied for many years, but usually 5-7 days per season, and without any real progress), like groomed runs (blue and easier blacks), usually dont go fast but try to work on carving nice(r) turns.  I just need the bindings to reliably hold and release only when necessary.  Should the z10 be sufficient?

post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by alera View Post

Greetings,

 

This is my first post, as I'm hoping to get a better idea if I made a mistake with my recent purchase.  I recently bought skis with salomon z10 bindings (3-10 din).  According to the din settings table, I should be at about 7.5 - 8, so, on the surface, the included bindings look like they should work.  However, there are multiple discussions how people need or like to have din 14 and higher bindings, so I'm beginning to doubt whether my bindings will be ok.  Also, z10 bindings are sometimes described as designed for women or lighter skiers, which makes me doubt my purchase evern more.  Looking for more experienced folks to chime in / provide feedback.

 

I'm 6'1", 210-215 lbs, boot size 26.5, an intermediate (skied for many years, but usually 5-7 days per season, and without any real progress), like groomed runs (blue and easier blacks), usually dont go fast but try to work on carving nice(r) turns.  I just need the bindings to reliably hold and release only when necessary.  Should the z10 be sufficient?

 

Yes.

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the reassurance.  Seeing people discussing how they need very high din bindings got me all worried.

post #4 of 8

If you are skiing at moderate speed, on groomed terrain, a few times a year, there is no reason not to follow the DIN chart.  Some people will exceed the chart for various reasons...usually that reason is "ego".

post #5 of 8

I ski a higher level binding slightly below the recommended DIN setting for my ability.  While I have the ability it does put at the bottom of the bindings DIN scale, which may not always be the best thing.  Ideally in most cases as long as you are in middle and not at either extreme the bindings should be good for you.

 

The primary reason for me is at my toe piece is now metal. Depending on how you ski, this may or may not be an issue and may be more of a personal preference to the skier.  For me it's that I've had a bad experience with plastic toes which drove this decision.

 

Additionally, my binding comes under various name plates and has a wider lower range than shown on my model, so I know that I am still not at the extreme end of the scale.

 

To put this in perspective, my DIN is set at 9 (ideally 9.5 for my level), and have skied my wife's skis set 6.5 and had no releases for the few aggressive runs I skied.

 

Know why you want higher level bindings and settings.  In some cases is justified and some just because it's cool (and injury waiting to happen).  Otherwise, anywhere in the middle of the scale is always the best if there is any doubt based on an honest assessment of your circumstances.

post #6 of 8

You are not so much buying a higher DIN, but a better housing on the binding. An 8 is an 8 on any binding, even if it just goes to 10 but a 14 DIN will be a better built binding and will perform better while you are skiing. Remember besides being just a safety/release mechanism, the binding is also a performance interface. You want the binding to provide the best and most solid interface between the boot and the ski, a higher DIN binding will do that for you. 

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

If you are skiing at moderate speed, on groomed terrain, a few times a year, there is no reason not to follow the DIN chart.  Some people will exceed the chart for various reasons...usually that reason is "ego".

 

Skidude, you nailed it!!! icon14.gif

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

You are not so much buying a higher DIN, but a better housing on the binding. An 8 is an 8 on any binding, even if it just goes to 10 but a 14 DIN will be a better built binding and will perform better while you are skiing. Remember besides being just a safety/release mechanism, the binding is also a performance interface. You want the binding to provide the best and most solid interface between the boot and the ski, a higher DIN binding will do that for you. 

 

 

Bingo, this is usually why people go with a higher DIN than they technically need.  If you ski a ton, it is better to have an all-metal housing and barely be using your available range even though it's capable of performing at a much higher level simply because it will last much longer, and with a lesser degree of degredation over time of that desired performance. 

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