EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › The mechanics of bindig release
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The mechanics of bindig release

post #1 of 2
Thread Starter 

I was discussing this last night and I was unsure about the answer. 

 

We were discussing binding release and if an instructor could be subject to excess forces through their knees when a student collides with them at relatively low speeds. My argument was that in the scenario where a students skis pass over the top of the instructors ski then colide with the instructor the force exerted on the binding would be a twisting force around the ski (rather than a twisting force around your leg which is the normal mechanism for release).

 

Also, do the adjustments on the front and the rear of the binding control different types of release?

 

thanks

post #2 of 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by set321go View Post

I was discussing this last night and I was unsure about the answer. 

 

We were discussing binding release and if an instructor could be subject to excess forces through their knees when a student collides with them at relatively low speeds. My argument was that in the scenario where a students skis pass over the top of the instructors ski then colide with the instructor the force exerted on the binding would be a twisting force around the ski (rather than a twisting force around your leg which is the normal mechanism for release).

 

I'll answer part of this question with a quote from my first structural analysis instructor.  "A Bending Moment is a Bending Moment no matter how applied".  This means that if it results in the same forces around the given point, those forces will be same.  Newton and his Laws.

 

As to the initial part of the question.  This is more complex based on lots of factors such as binding internal friction, DIN setting, reaction of skier(s), speed of reaction/action and so on.  Slow twisting falls even with low DIN settings can cause injury more so than the high velocity load generally experienced during skiing.  Binding are meant to hold during what is experience during these loading periods (and the internal friction is a minimal part in this) and release when exceeded.  During slow falls we may exceed these points but not fast enough to overcome the internal friction.  Again Newton rears his ugly head...an object in motion stays in motion (or lack there off).

 

Also, do the adjustments on the front and the rear of the binding control different types of release?

 

No the design of the mechanics of the binding controls the different type of releases.  The adjustments control the level of hold/release.

 

thanks

 I'm sure that you'll get some better answers and explanations by some of the more experienced members.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › The mechanics of bindig release