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Spring skiing pants instead of shorts or blue jeans

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I'm shopping for a second pair of pants for downhill resort skiing when it's warm enough for some (but not me) to get away with shorts or blue jeans.  What do other skiers wear? 

 

I have a pair of waterproof, windproof, insulated pants.  They're great for mid-winter conditions, but they're warmer than I need for spring skiing, and they're too warm to wear indoors or in the car for more than just a few minutes.  Plus they're baggy and ugly.   

 

I'm thinking of pants designed for cross-country skiing or running, along the lines of SportHill's Terrain II or Day Pass Pants.  Windproof, breathable and moisture wicking.  Cut just full enough to wear thick, thin or no base layer underneath for cool to mild weather, but not baggy or thick, so I could wear a pair of full side zip shell pants over them for the first couple lift rides in the morning and  to keep handy (backpack, locker or in the car) and put them on when the weather turns cold.

post #2 of 18

About the only XC ski pants I've found that are truly  windproof at downhill speeds are the storm-grade ones with the shell front, like the Craft Storm and Craft AXC.

post #3 of 18

Goretex or other waterproof/breathable shell pants. Depending on what you wear underneath, they're good for any temperature.

 

On real cold days, I wear fleece pants and long underwear, on warm days shorts. Haven't worn insulated pants in 20+ years.

post #4 of 18

123456

post #5 of 18

Isn't it a bit early to start in on spring skiing?

 

Anyway, when it gets warm enough that my usual ski pants are too warm I break out the splash pants I use for sailing small sailboats.  Works pretty well and I don't spring ski enough to warrant special gear for that.  Look for something like this: http://www.apsltd.com/p-23348-gill-waterproof-waist-pant.aspx

 

Shorts?  I don't wear shorts even in the summer.

post #6 of 18

post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

Found what I was looking for - soft-shell pants.  REI's Mistral - only $99.50, less than $90 after discount, including tax.  Sized by waist and inseam, so I got a very good fit.  Trim cut so they'll fit over a base layer or under a hard shell when needed.  Trick was not telling the salesperson I was looking for ski pants.  Although they should work great, softshell pants aren't designed primarily for skiing, are usually displayed with hiking, climbing or backpacking apparel.

 

After I got home, I searched for them and found an interesting Q&A at OutsideOnline's Gear Guy:

 

http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-gear/gear-guy/What-are-the-best-multi-sport-pants.html

post #8 of 18

i have these; they are great. plus you get the REI warranty.  

post #9 of 18

Prowl the second-hand stores for some genuine 70's vintage wool/nylon stretch pants.  Or maybe eBay.  I have two pair, one made by Spyder I get out in the spring.  

post #10 of 18

Personally, I'd go with uninsulated waterproof, breathable shell pants with generous vents.  Spring snow is wet snow and the reviews suggest that the REI Mistral pants will absorb water.

post #11 of 18

did u see my new mtn hardwear shells for $195 shipped?

post #12 of 18

Sorry, Finn.  I'm a small in pants.  Anyway, I'm not sure if I could pull it off having that color on top and bottom.  I just got the Snowpocalypse jacket in Voltage.  I have no complaints about my North Face Freedom pants after two seasons.

post #13 of 18

it was really for the OP but......  

post #14 of 18

Discounted NF Freedoms at well under $100 are hard to beat. I bet they keep out wind and water better than anything that's woven and stretchy.

post #15 of 18

Well, I paid $130 for my TNF Freedoms, in November 2010.  It looks like they're still available and priced similarly.  I think they're affordable because they use Hyvent instead of the pricier membranes.

 

Finn, the OP already bought his REI Mistrals; so, I guessed (wrongly) you were responding to me.

post #16 of 18

HyVent is a inexpensive, rather non-breathable PU plastic bag of sorts!  biggrin.gif  the Material used in the DRYQ is an ePtfe; a better eVent material that is truly amazing. it's only downfall I have noticed is that it isn't as heat retaining as Gor-tex due to its breathability (not a bad thing really except in uber cold and then you don't need H20-proof) . It has a great soft shell like feel that is soft and pliable but is incredibly H20-Proof as well. The DWR finish is also highly durable; which is just as important as the actual material.  

post #17 of 18

I'm definitely looking forward to my new DryQ Elite Snowpocalypse jacket this season.  I find that I need and generate more heat in my torso and arms.  As for pants, I've been less discriminating.  A good side-zip vent goes a long way.  The key, of course, is proper layering.

post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post

Personally, I'd go with uninsulated waterproof, breathable shell pants with generous vents.  Spring snow is wet snow and the reviews suggest that the REI Mistral pants will absorb water.

 

This is what I've done.  If it's a really warm day, I just wear my hiking wind / rain pants that I have primarily for hiking purposes.  They were some cheap thing I got from REI years ago.  If I wear a light Patagonia Capilene (or whatever your favorite brand is) underneath, they're warm enough if the weather changes and it starts getting cold.  They have elastic around the leg cuffs so they're reasonably snug against the boot and will keep slushy snow from spraying up into your legs.

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