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P tex base repairs.

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

How do you get P tex to stay in a core shot along side the steel edge?

I cleaned the area roughened the core a bit, layered in the P tex, scaped and waxed.

The P Tex was out in a moning.      .

post #2 of 12

P-tex sticks to p-tex. If you're dealing with core AND metal on one side you'll have difficulty getting it to stick.  There are some other compounds folks use to fill between the core and p-tex repair so the p-tex clings to the hole better, 2 part epoxy with extra resin is one I've used with some success.  There's really nothing I know of that will stick to the metal really well though..

post #3 of 12

P-tex will only bond to other p-tex. It won't bond to the ski's core or to the metal edge.

 

For damage that penetrates the p-tex through to the core of the ski or exposes the metal edge it's necessary to weld in a thin ‘foundation' layer prior to applying the p-tex. For this you use a product called Metal Grip which is available on a roll or in cut lengths. Metal Grip is a co-polymer wire of resin & polythene. It will bond to most materials at a lower temperature than p-tex. It's the ideal 'foundation' material for repairing major damage to bases where in the past only a patch might have been successful. Metal Grip has to be installed using either a 280-300C temperature soldering iron (like the Kunzmann Base Doc II tool) or using the hot tip/plate of a base repair pistol.
 

post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

.....There's really nothing I know of that will stick to the metal really well though..

I've done '000's of repairs over metal using a MetalGrip foundation & never had a pull-out. However my repairs are all welded repairs & not candles.

 

Even without exposed metal or core a candle repair gives a very poor bond due to not only the carbon in the melt from the flame (do a clear candle repair to see the amount of 'dirt' in it) but also that the dripping molten material cools so fast when it hits the cold ski that it hardly melts the contact area so giving a poor bond.

 

When using a Base Doc or similar one melts both the base material & the repair strip together to give a proper weld which is waaay stronger & without carbon contamination.

post #5 of 12
Have the same problem,gonna try JB weld.
post #6 of 12

I've had good luck with a thin layer of epoxy laid on the core that I crosshatch-score with a SERB, then use a gun or iron and roller to mash the p-tex in.  No candles for me - I think they're next to uselsss.  

post #7 of 12

I use metal grip, it's the only thing i find that's easy to use/apply and works, a little of it will last you a long long time.

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by spyderjon View Post


Even without exposed metal or core a candle repair gives a very poor bond due to not only the carbon in the melt from the flame (do a clear candle repair to see the amount of 'dirt' in it) but also that the dripping molten material cools so fast when it hits the cold ski that it hardly melts the contact area so giving a poor bond.

 

 

The best candle bonds are the ones where the all-blue flame travels down the drip and onto the ski.

post #9 of 12
The best candle bonds still suck and never last, It's only good for short term repair. The trick is to keep the candle as close to the base as possible to prevent carbon buildup. I prefer the metal grip and ribbon with a soldering iron. Never had a repair pull out.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

Never had a repair pull out.

 

Me neither smile.gif

post #11 of 12

I had the "opportunity" to do a fair amount of base repair last season.  So far, they've all held.  My first step is to remove any rocks, grit, etc. from the gouge.  The next step I do is to slightly enlarge the gouge with a slow Dremel.  I aim for straight or slightly under-cut sides, using a Dremel bit like the 115, 116, 194 or 196.  If the gouge is shallow, I may make it a bit deeper, maybe 2mm.  If there's exposed core or edge, I'll try to rough it up a bit.  Then, of course, I'll vacuum or blow out all loose debris.

 

I use a base repair iron to fill the gouge in layers.  If there's any exposed metal or core, I start with Wintersteiger Metalgrip.  Subsequent layers are Ski Visions base repair ribbon.  It takes practice to melt it all in without voids, using enough heat to melt adjoining materials together.

 

Once cool, I go after it with a metal scraper, Surform, and Ski Visions base flattener.  I stroke from tip to tail, but I begin with the rear part of the repair and work forward, to avoid peeling it out.  In my experience, the repair will always have a different texture and won't take wax well.  So, I don't make repairs for simply cosmetic reasons.

post #12 of 12

I'm jus gonna rec a couple products that I really like that aren't mentioned in this thread.

 

If you are doing any welds - this over priced p-tex roller really makes a difference  http://www.svst.com/ItemForm.aspx?item=PTR&Category=c8791c50-384c-42d0-ac2a-0808fa8fb0cd

 

Instead of p-tex candles, try this for final(post weld) or superficial area repairs  http://www.toko.ch/en/products/tools/base-tuning/repair-powder-40g-graphite

 

 

will have to agree that metal grip is awesome - only downfall is that base patching may become a lost art because of it.  frown.gif

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