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what makes a good or better Stem?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

in looking around at stems (I am going to a 70) there seems to be little advantage in spending 100 when you can find similar stems for $25-$50. I do see some are slightly lighter and some have 4 vs 2 bolt faces ( I think a 4 is better for carbon bars) but is ther really any reason to spend 100 or more on a stem?  I am looking at a Easton EA50 right now for $30.00 

post #2 of 5
I am using a Gravity stem with Enve carbon dh bars. No issues whatsoever. The clamp in the front is critical. Use the four bolt front for easier access and so you can use riser bars if you wish.

You get a lighter stem, and perhaps a sexier design for more money, but unless you go carbon (which I am reluctant to do) you aren't saving a ton of weight.

You may want to check out mtbr reviews on stems. As I said, I can vouch for the gravity, even though I wanted a Thomson in the first place. It is cheaper and has proven reliable with carbon bars during aggressive am riding.

While this goes without saying...i will say it anyway: remember that carbon bars require a little extra attention when putting on clamps for equipment and stems. You don't want to damage by over tightening.

tw
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

Yeah, I am running an inexpensive Bonnie stem right now that works but I want to drop to a 0* 70. I did check MTBR and like the other reviews there, there's no consensus on anything!

post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

Yeah, I am running an inexpensive Bonnie stem right now that works but I want to drop to a 0* 70. I did check MTBR and like the other reviews there, there's no consensus on anything!

If you are looking for a consensus, Thomson is generally the go to stem of choice for the majority of our custom builds.  That being said, owning more bikes than I do skis, some in excess of $10k, they all seem to hold a handlebar.  Even my  stupid expensive S-Works bike has an old C'dale stem on it because it was the size I needed.  I think about replacing it with something carbon, but I go thru bikes as fast as most here change skis.

post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork View Post

If you are looking for a consensus, Thomson is generally the go to stem of choice for the majority of our custom builds.  That being said, owning more bikes than I do skis, some in excess of $10k, they all seem to hold a handlebar.  Even my  stupid expensive S-Works bike has an old C'dale stem on it because it was the size I needed.  I think about replacing it with something carbon, but I go thru bikes as fast as most here change skis.

hey thanks! Gotta extra 70 laying around?  :)

 

Not looking for consensus on a brand, just confirmation or correction of my opinion that stems really seem to be stems.....  PM me if you don't want to post but do you work at a shop and where in NJ are you. 

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