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Probably the 500th time a newbie asked about skis

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Howdy, new to skiing and the site. 

Let me begin with my apologies for the thread if it's redundant or just plain tiresome.  I started skiing last year and enjoyed it immensely even with borrowed boots and skis.  I have no idea if they fit correctly or not.  The boots seemed a bit big as when I was on the lift they would shift forward a bit, but maybe that's normal.  My girl got me into skiing, but even though she's pretty damn good, she hasn't been a tremendous amount of help in selecting equipment or narrowing the immense field.  I've primarily been looking for a good used carving ski in the low 160cm range.  The number of choices out there simply has my head swimming.  If y'all could let me know if I'm on the right track and perhaps some suggestions, I'd be immensely grateful!   

 

Where in the world are you skiing?  I'm skiing in Michigan.

 

What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry)  Groomed runs, almost exclusively, a few forays into the trees and moguls.

 

How many days a year do you ski?  Last year I skied 3 times.  Goin' forward it'll be 10-15 days.

 

How advanced are you as a skier?  I'm an intermediate, MAYBE advanced intermediate.  I can navigate the green and blue without incident.  I managed the black runs that I've done, but the speed is a bit much.

 

What's your height and weight?  I'm 5'7" and 140lbs.

post #2 of 13

Welcome to Epic Ski and your question has been asked far more than 500 times.

 

First, all will tell you that boots need to be your first priority. Find a good ski shop and let a good bootfitter examine your feet and base recommendations based that exam. The common error is that boots are sold too big and the liners compress, leaving you with a sloppy fit.

 

As far as skis, there is a pair for sale in the Epic Gear Section that would serve you very well on a small, hard snow mountain.They come with adjustable bindings and the seller is well known in the community. Check out the following link. 

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/113577/2012-magnum-7-6-iq-170cm-for-sale

 

You need an easy turning, hard snow oriented ski in a shorter length. The 78 mm waist is a good fit for your needs. 

post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwiki View Post

Howdy, new to skiing and the site. 

Let me begin with my apologies for the thread if it's redundant or just plain tiresome.  I started skiing last year and enjoyed it immensely even with borrowed boots and skis.  I have no idea if they fit correctly or not.  The boots seemed a bit big as when I was on the lift they would shift forward a bit, but maybe that's normal.  My girl got me into skiing, but even though she's pretty damn good, she hasn't been a tremendous amount of help in selecting equipment or narrowing the immense field.  I've primarily been looking for a good used carving ski in the low 160cm range.  The number of choices out there simply has my head swimming.  If y'all could let me know if I'm on the right track and perhaps some suggestions, I'd be immensely grateful!   

 

Where in the world are you skiing?  I'm skiing in Michigan.

 

How many days a year do you ski?  Last year I skied 3 times.  Goin' forward it'll be 10-15 days.

 

How advanced are you as a skier?  I'm an intermediate, MAYBE advanced intermediate.  I can navigate the green and blue without incident.  I managed the black runs that I've done, but the speed is a bit much.

 

Welcome to EpicSki!  Sounds like you've been bitten by the ski bug completely.

 

No recommendations for skis, but a bit of advice about what "green, blue, black" mean.  They are specific to a ski area.  The black runs you've done are NOTHING like a black run at a big mountain in the Rockies.  There are blue runs in the west that are harder (steeper) than any black run in the midwest.  Blue runs out west are also way longer than you can imagine right now.  Hope to see you out there one day!

 

Spend your time and energy finding a good boot from a local boot fitter.  Do not buy boots online or from a big box sporting goods store.  Then invest a little more money on a few lessons.  Take a group lesson in early season.  It may turn into a private or semi-private.  You'll have more fun once you learn the proper form to do more than "navigate without incident."

 

Check out the tips for newbies here:

http://www.epicski.com/t/65105/beginners-tip-bible-share-yours

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

Living Proof and marznc:  Thanks for the welcome and the advice~  Regarding the Blizzards, wouldn't those be a bit long?  I've been primarily looking at skis in the 160-165 length range with the thought that they'd be significantly more fun, not to mention manageable, on the short runs I'll be skiing.  I did get fitted and got boots yesterday...yay!  =)  They fit insanely better than the boots I was borrowing last year...lmao, just makes me laugh that I was able to ski at all the way my feet slid around in those boots.  Marznc, yeah I know where I ski might be named Crystal Mountain, but it's just a molehill in comparison to whats out West.  I'm hoping to get out there next year!  At this point I'm just excited to hit the slopes this year with equipment that fits!

 

Sooooo, that takes me back to lookin' for some sage advice from those in the know.  I've been doing a ton of research but finding reviews of intermediate equipment is exhausting and sometimes completely futile.  Some of the skis that have caught my attention are:

 

Atomic Nomad Smoke Ti

Dynastar Outland 80 xt 

Volkl Tigershark 10ft

Nordica Nitrous

Rossi Experience 76

 

Any feedback on these...or other recommendations?

post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwiki View Post

Living Proof and marznc:  Thanks for the welcome and the advice~  Regarding the Blizzards, wouldn't those be a bit long?  I've been primarily looking at skis in the 160-165 length range with the thought that they'd be significantly more fun, not to mention manageable, on the short runs I'll be skiing.  I did get fitted and got boots yesterday...yay!  =)  They fit insanely better than the boots I was borrowing last year...lmao, just makes me laugh that I was able to ski at all the way my feet slid around in those boots.  Marznc, yeah I know where I ski might be named Crystal Mountain, but it's just a molehill in comparison to whats out West.  I'm hoping to get out there next year!  At this point I'm just excited to hit the slopes this year with equipment that fits!

Did you ask about skis where you got the boots?  Are there any Demo Days anywhere within driving distance?  Even though you are just getting started, you'd be surprised at what differences you can feel between skis.  In the end, it doesn't matter what reviewers say, if a ski feels good to you then that's probably the right ski to buy.

 

Unless you find a real deal, there is something to be said for renting skis for a bit before you buy anything.  That way you can try our different lengths and different brands.

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwiki View Post

Living Proof and marznc:  Thanks for the welcome and the advice~  Regarding the Blizzards, wouldn't those be a bit long?  I've been primarily looking at skis in the 160-165 length range with the thought that they'd be significantly more fun, not to mention manageable, on the short runs I'll be skiing. 

One advantage to the Blizzards mentioned is that they have system bindings.  That would make them easy to sell later because they can be used with any size boot.  You can send a PM to the seller and ask about the length.

 

Here's a place to start to length about how to choose a ski of the correct length.  Also can consider where a ski reaches, meaning chin, nose, or forehead.

 

http://www.epicski.com/a/choosing-a-ski-length

post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

I did discuss skis with him and he largely pushed the Rossi experience 74 and experience 76 as those were the skis that were nearest to my budget.  Regarding used skis, they didn't have many to choose from as they'd had a tent sale earlier in the month.  There were a couple others he mentioned that I might check out...the Atomic Nomad Smoke and Smoke Ti version, Fischer Progressors, and Salomon X Wing Tornado. 

Regarding ski length, that thread says 160, and I'm 5'7"...which is 170cm, that fact and the type of runs I'll be skiing is why I thought 170 might be a bit long.  The nearest demo day isn't until after Christmas and there's no guarantee I'll be able to make it.  Now that I have boots that fit, I can continue to ski the skis I have if necessary.  I'd love to be able to rent a bunch of skis, but at 30 a pop...that's not likely.  What I'd like, is to narrow the field a bit, by borrowing upon the experience and knowledge of others.           
 

post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwiki View Post

Living Proof and marznc:  Thanks for the welcome and the advice~  Regarding the Blizzards, wouldn't those be a bit long?  I've been primarily looking at skis in the 160-165 length range with the thought that they'd be significantly more fun, not to mention manageable, on the short runs I'll be skiing.  I did get fitted and got boots yesterday...yay!  =)  They fit insanely better than the boots I was borrowing last year...lmao, just makes me laugh that I was able to ski at all the way my feet slid around in those boots.  Marznc, yeah I know where I ski might be named Crystal Mountain, but it's just a molehill in comparison to whats out West.  I'm hoping to get out there next year!  At this point I'm just excited to hit the slopes this year with equipment that fits!

 

Sooooo, that takes me back to lookin' for some sage advice from those in the know.  I've been doing a ton of research but finding reviews of intermediate equipment is exhausting and sometimes completely futile.  Some of the skis that have caught my attention are:

 

Atomic Nomad Smoke Ti

Dynastar Outland 80 xt 

Volkl Tigershark 10ft

Nordica Nitrous

Rossi Experience 76

 

Any feedback on these...or other recommendations?

Glad you got your boots sorted out.  icon14.gif

Welcome to EpicSki!

 

I'm originally from Michigan so I'm familiar with the kind of terrain you'll be skiing for the most part.  Where do you tend to ski? 

 

As for the skis you mention in your list, the only one I'd steer clear of is the Volkl Tigershark (for your skill level) Volkl has some great skis that you may like but that one is not going to be forgiving for someone getting their ski mojo. 

 

The ski that Living Proof recommended is another good option. 

The thing I like about the other skis you have on your list is that they're good skis for your advancing skills, but won't punish you(when) you make a mistake while you're still learning. 

 

Honestly, there are a lot of good skis out there, in the category that you're looking into that will serve you well. 

post #9 of 13
Hi gwiki, I agree with Trekchick that there are a lot of great skis out there, I also agree with you that the skis I'm selling, the Blizzard Magnum 7.6 (http://www.epicski.com/t/113577/2012-magnum-7-6-iq-170cm-for-sale - thanks for the plug though Living Proof!) are a little too long for your weight and ability, 165 would be plenty long.

The other thing is definitely to focus on getting fit for and buying boots that are not too big for you. If your boots are too big you lose control over your skis. They should feel very tight getting in and out of. Once they're on they shouldn't be too tight, but you should have no play, your heel shouldn't rise up, your feet shouldn't move around in them and you should be able to maintain contact with the front of the boot with your shin with very little space in there.

A few lessons will really help, and if you can afford it do private lessons, you get so much more that way than in a group, although group lessons can be great if that's all you can afford.

Have fun!
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

A few lessons will really help, and if you can afford it do private lessons, you get so much more that way than in a group, although group lessons can be great if that's all you can afford.
Have fun!

If you can go for a group lesson during early season, sometimes that can turn into a private or semi-private.  At our little mountain the group lessons in the evening are rarely full.  Does not take much snow to learn basic techniques.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwiki View Post

I did discuss skis with him and he largely pushed the Rossi experience 74 and experience 76 as those were the skis that were nearest to my budget. 

 

 I'd love to be able to rent a bunch of skis, but at 30 a pop...that's not likely.  What I'd like, is to narrow the field a bit, by borrowing upon the experience and knowledge of others.           

 

 

Both Rossi's you mention are a good start. Every manufacturer makes something that will work for your skill set and body weight/size. The renting thing... will they apply that $$ to a purchase? If so, it's kind of like $$$ in the bank.. well, not really, but you know what I mean. Good on you for getting your boots sorted out. That's job #1! 

 

(Used gear. I'm guessing the Grand Traverse Ski Club still has their annual ski swap. You might find something decent there.)

post #12 of 13
Sorry I didn't even read the OP's boot fitting comments, than I suggested getting a boot fitting. lol.
post #13 of 13
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