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Tracking Elevation gain and other stats

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I do not have an iPhone - too cheap for a Smartphone. But I've seen people on the slopes use their iPhones to track elevation gain, runs, mph, and other data while skiing. I'd like to do that this season but don't want to pay $500 for a Iphone + extra cost for a data plan.


What alternatives are out there to do this in lieu of an iPhone + service plan? I don't mind dropping a hundred or two hundred, but would like ot be able to the use the device for other mapping as well.

post #2 of 15

I use a Brunton Summit ADC and track my vertical.  It relies on barometric pressure rather than GPS.  Both can go NUTS at times.  It depends on how much you want to track.  The Brunton set me back $149 about 5 years ago, I see it's down to $90-odd now.  I change the battery every year, but unlike the Vertech watch, you can do that yourself.  

post #3 of 15

any device to just measure vertical/speed is a waste of dollars and unneeded stuff to carry.

It's pretty easy to know how much vertical you ski by how many lifts you take - look for something that does a lot more (of the non skiing daily uses you need or don"t waste your money).  Speed

measurement is interesting for about 3 runs once you've done it you know how fast your going.

post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 

Found the solution! I have an iPod Touch. If I purchase separate GPS unit like the Dual Electronics XGPS150 and combine it with an app like the MotionX GPS, I can record all of the ski data that I want to. Upside is it will also work with CoPilot GPS Software and work on my iPad as well.


(Not an advertisement - trying to offer helpful information.)

post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by noncrazycanuck View Post

any device to just measure vertical/speed is a waste of dollars and unneeded stuff to carry.

It's pretty easy to know how much vertical you ski by how many lifts you take - look for something that does a lot more (of the non skiing daily uses you need or don"t waste your money).  Speed

measurement is interesting for about 3 runs once you've done it you know how fast your going.

Not every mountain publishes the vertical rise of their lifts.

Not every lift will give you the entire vertical of the mountain.

It can be a lot to remember if you're out there enjoying the day.

Some people are data nuts.  You're not.  

post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I use a Brunton Summit ADC and track my vertical.  It relies on barometric pressure rather than GPS.  Both can go NUTS at times.  It depends on how much you want to track.  The Brunton set me back $149 about 5 years ago, I see it's down to $90-odd now.  I change the battery every year, but unlike the Vertech watch, you can do that yourself.  

 

Wait a minute...you know that Whitefish Mountain tracks your vertical by your ski pass, and you can look it up online, right?

 

Did you ever see Mully Muldown? I did once...pretty exciting!

post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Skier View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I use a Brunton Summit ADC and track my vertical.  It relies on barometric pressure rather than GPS.  Both can go NUTS at times.  It depends on how much you want to track.  The Brunton set me back $149 about 5 years ago, I see it's down to $90-odd now.  I change the battery every year, but unlike the Vertech watch, you can do that yourself.  

 

Wait a minute...you know that Whitefish Mountain tracks your vertical by your ski pass, and you can look it up online, right?

 

Did you ever see Mully Muldown? I did once...pretty exciting!

I'm high on the vert list, but would be far higher if I were obsessing about getting scanned, correcting the scans using a scanner from another lift, etc.  Personally, I don't care about their scans OR WAITING to get scanned.  I start my tracking in the locker room and stop it at the end of the day.  I can ski all the lifts without worrying that the lifties are lazy at some particular lift or waiting until they come over to my part of the line.  It's not about the competition with the rest of the mountain, it's about my own results.  My friends who rely on (and care about) the lift scan just ski the mountain differently.  

post #8 of 15

I guess it might be interesting to know and record exactly how much vertical you get in a day. Whistler has that annoying app, but I still prefer my method. When my legs start to get tired I know I am over 25k, if I'm not at all  tired under 20k but when I am bagged it was a good day. Plus as a bonus I don't hear the phone go off when I leave it in the car.     

post #9 of 15

Well I don't need any smart apps telling me how much I ski as I already know that I have the most runs skied--lifetime, at my local mountain.

post #10 of 15

and I'm pretty sure the resident smart ApSS  is the senator.   

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by noncrazycanuck View Post

and I'm pretty sure the resident smart ApSS  is the senator.   

In the trophy cabinet in the lobby of the Nancy Greene Cahilty Lodge there is a great photo of Nancy and Jean Claude Killy receiving their globes as the first winners of initial FIS World Cup in 1967. Back then Nancy was no smart ApSS but the then 22 yea old in tight ski pants had a great ApSS.

 

Today you might think she has a big ApSS but you would be wrong. Nancy is in great shape for someone in her late 60s and is very smooth on a race course or out free skiing.

post #12 of 15

Get it in watch form, so at least it does something else (tells you what time it is, and maybe will have temp barometer or other gizmos too)

 

 

Here's link on the subject, but search for altimeter watch and there are lots of lower cost options now.

http://www.gearreview.com/altiwatches.asp


Edited by raytseng - 9/19/12 at 11:16pm
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by noncrazycanuck View Post

any device to just measure vertical/speed is a waste of dollars and unneeded stuff to carry.

It's pretty easy to know how much vertical you ski by how many lifts you take - look for something that does a lot more (of the non skiing daily uses you need or don"t waste your money).  Speed

measurement is interesting for about 3 runs once you've done it you know how fast your going.


A little bit harsh and opinionated, no? I'm with you, but some folks love that kind of stuff.

 

What I would say to the OP is to be sure you really want all that function before laying the money out. I bought a watch with some altitude capability a few years back. At the time, I was looking for the fancier, more expensive Suunto ski-specific computer, but it wasn't available any longer. I'm glad it wasn't because I've never actually used the altimeter function on the cheaper watch I did buy. I used it to tell time on the slopes. Then the battery died. As it turned out, fiddling around with a watch with my cold, numb fingers didn't really seem as fun as just pointing downhill and getting after it.

post #14 of 15

these two posts sum it up perfectly.  if you rip groomers all day then this kind of data is probably interesting for about 3 days then you know what you skied and you know how fast you ski. how much vertical?  does it matter? How fast? OK, unless you are racing, your speed is pretty much going to be consistent and once you know, well, as BB king said, The thrill is gone..   The apps don't do much for me personally but there are some who like to see where they skied so they can show friends and such but if you ski off-piste a lot of what you ski isn't on the maps and its usually not about speed so it ends up being pretty useless.  Since you are self-proclaimed cheap; I would suggest you borrow one from a friend for a day or two and then decide. My guess is you won't want one after that. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by noncrazycanuck View Post

any device to just measure vertical/speed is a waste of dollars and unneeded stuff to carry.

It's pretty easy to know how much vertical you ski by how many lifts you take - look for something that does a lot more (of the non skiing daily uses you need or don"t waste your money).  Speed

measurement is interesting for about 3 runs once you've done it you know how fast your going.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post


A little bit harsh and opinionated, no? I'm with you, but some folks love that kind of stuff.

 

What I would say to the OP is to be sure you really want all that function before laying the money out. I bought a watch with some altitude capability a few years back. At the time, I was looking for the fancier, more expensive Suunto ski-specific computer, but it wasn't available any longer. I'm glad it wasn't because I've never actually used the altimeter function on the cheaper watch I did buy. I used it to tell time on the slopes. Then the battery died. As it turned out, fiddling around with a watch with my cold, numb fingers didn't really seem as fun as just pointing downhill and getting after it.

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

In the trophy cabinet in the lobby of the Nancy Greene Cahilty Lodge there is a great photo of Nancy and Jean Claude Killy receiving their globes as the first winners of initial FIS World Cup in 1967. Back then Nancy was no smart ApSS but the then 22 yea old in tight ski pants had a great ApSS.

 

Today you might think she has a big ApSS but you would be wrong. Nancy is in great shape for someone in her late 60s and is very smooth on a race course or out free skiing.


just me trying to be a smart ApSS. Sure she is older and slower but when it's competitive she still gets her mojo and slays it. One of Canada's greats.

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