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Stockli skis difference

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I noted that over the years Stockli have produced "Edition" version on certain models, eg. Rotor 74 & Rotor 74 Edition; Sinox Light & Sinox Ed Light; Laser Cross & Laser Cross Edition; Spirit & Spirit Ed

 

Anyone know what difference is the "Edition" version compare with the non-Edition version? Is it to do with the flex?

post #2 of 6

As far as I know, the edition versions are a touch lighter and softer flexing, aimed to be slightly less demanding. But we're talking Stockli here; these are not push button skis. 

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks. That is what I guessed as well.

post #4 of 6

Very surprised at everyone's opinion of Stocklis, forstered no doubt by Nicholas's advertising them as the stiffest, meanest, most difficult to use skis going.  How many of you would really want that and difficult would it be to make.  The wonderful thing about Stocklis, especially the all-mountain Stormrider line is how easy they are to ski.  Stiff torsionally for hold but moderate flex longitudinally so they are supple and easy to ski.

 

We've sold Stocklis for ten years now and the wonderful thing is that we can easily sell them down to any intermediate that is looking for a ski to improve on.  Absolutely they are push button skis, that is the design magic.

 

Lou

post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou Rosenfeld View Post

Very surprised at everyone's opinion of Stocklis, forstered no doubt by Nicholas's advertising them as the stiffest, meanest, most difficult to use skis going.  How many of you would really want that and difficult would it be to make.  The wonderful thing about Stocklis, especially the all-mountain Stormrider line is how easy they are to ski.  Stiff torsionally for hold but moderate flex longitudinally so they are supple and easy to ski.

 

We've sold Stocklis for ten years now and the wonderful thing is that we can easily sell them down to any intermediate that is looking for a ski to improve on.  Absolutely they are push button skis, that is the design magic.

 

Lou

I have several pair of Stocklis and most people who have them that I've met love the ski.  My take is that they are a skiers ski, in that if you know how to use the edges of a ski you will love them.  If all you can do is slide turns, you will not appreciate the torsional stiffness.  If you can carve turns you will love them. 

 

The only Stockli I ever owned that was the "stiffest, meanest" ski I'd ever been on was the FIS GS ski, which belongs on the World Cup and not on my feet.  It, like all skis used on the WC, is designed for one speed: too fast for a crowded groomer.  It was a blast for those early morning frozen solid runs, but then I'd switch to another ski for the rest of the day (I reluctantly sold the skis because of lack of use).  Surprisingly, I saw a video of Joey Cordeau skiing moguls on a shorter pair of the regular Stockli GS.   The FIS model is a lot stiffer and heavier (more titinal) than the regular model.

 

The skis are extremely well built and tend to last a long time.  The Stormriders are always highly rated but IMHO people should also demo the Rotors.  They are marketed towards the park guys who want to ski the whole mountain, but in reality they are a killer all mountain ski that carves well on groomers.

 

The Lasers are legendary for a reason...it is hard to find a better carving ski.  They podium every year on the WC and in cross competition, yet many poeple never heard of them.

 

Realskiers.com had a lot of good things to say about the 2013 "Y".  Stockli may have a better version of that type of ski than any other firm right now.

post #6 of 6

Lou, given the placement of your comment, perhaps you were referring to my comment about Stockli's not being push button skis. Maybe not, but in either case, I'll stand by the comment, since IMO Stockli's, like Kastles, are not as "automatic" as many skis. And I really think very few of the more well known models are suitable for intermediates. Now I say this as a guy who's owned a bunch of Stocklis over the years, including classics like the SS, AT, and XL, and currently the Rotor 84, and the Stormrider 95, and the CX. And if you check, I wrote some very strong reviews of several Stocklis a while back. I like 'em. 

 

That said, IME you have to have a basic sense of where your weight is and what you're doing, and not get in the back seat. Stocklis want a focused, fairly assertive driver. This does not scream intermediate to me. Even their "cruiser" models like the Spirit or the Editions perform at a higher level than many competitor's expert skis.

 

IMO their handling probably reflects their basic design philosophies. Stocklis and Kastles, for instance, rest on fairly conservative designs (both Stockli and Kastle came late and only partially toward the rocker party; both are full of metal in most versions; both - while supple and progressive - are fairly stiff compared to many competitors, neither line offers much in the way of deep sidecuts or unusual shapes to make turns easier). And if you're saying that you can't figure out where Stockli got this reputation for "mean" skis, I'd suggest the SS's or DP's or even the later, tamed down XXL's. Even the pre-early rise VXL, a very nice "non-mean" ski, is not a push button. Supple, yes. Smooth, yes. Forgiving, no. I assume this season's with early rise requires a touch less attention in crud or slush. 

 

My opinion, incidentally, may also reflect my size. I've never found most Stocklis very happy at low speeds, eg, low forces. If I weighed 200, I might be able to bend them to my will, so to speak. I bought some SR 95's in fact, for blasting down western crud and chop. Trees, we'll see...

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