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Canyons or Snowbasin? - Page 2

post #31 of 43
Quote:
Regarding the acreage, Canyons is the largest lift served resort in Utah.  PowMow has more acreage when counting the cat accessible skiing.  The reasons lift tickets cost more for the three Park City areas should be obvious, particularly after last year when it was important for most skiers to actually do something besides ski man made snow over Christmas (or ski on rocks at areas without snowmaking) and eat at a fast food restaurant on the way home.  I think access to a resort city, shopping, restaurants, decent lodging, galleries, lots of family activities, access to a ton of other activities, not needing to drive or drive far to a ski area, on resort activities, etc. come into play when pricing lift tickets.  This is why there is the proposed gondola going from Deer Valley into Park City...giving visitors more for their money while improving business on Main Street.

In other words, exactly what I already said. 

 

I mentioned the price simply because it's relevant to the size conversation (i.e. you pay extra for a cat ride, but still [a lot] less than Canyons).

 

Never eaten at Canyons so no opinion there, but your characterization of Snowbasin as cafeteria/lodge food is not particularly accurate. Don't know many other resort "cafeterias" with carving and stir fry stations.

post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post

In other words, exactly what I already said. 

 

I mentioned the price simply because it's relevant to the size conversation (i.e. you pay extra for a cat ride, but still [a lot] less than Canyons).

 

Never eaten at Canyons so no opinion there, but your characterization of Snowbasin as cafeteria/lodge food is not particularly accurate. Don't know many other resort "cafeterias" with carving and stir fry stations.

 

Pretty much, you seem to be in violent agreement. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

Food?  The prize has to go to Canyons because of Chef John Murcho's influence (he recently left for Sun Valley) or with Deer Valley.    There are other areas with good lodge/cafeteria food, like Solitude (I like the burgers) and Snowbasin (really good offerings).  Canyons and Deer Valley are obviously looking for bookings from visitors and conventions year round that demand upscale fare, so food is a priority.  The OP can't use his college meal card (probably paid for by dad) at any of these areas, so he'll have to hit Smith's and buy a sandwich on his way to the skiing.

 

 

I think he was talking about the fine dining offerings in the base village at the canyons...   

 

I personally think the Canyons and Snowbasin are "tied" for best on mountain food offerings in UT. But I haven't been to Deer Valley in years so I may be out of touch with what they are doing.   

post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasudeva View Post

Well I will be driving up in subaru forrester with 3 other friends to split the gas tab with so figuring the distance is 170 miles round trip with gas at 3.60 a gallon at ruffly 20 mpg (High way mileage is better but we will be driving in the snow and traffic) that puts the cost of gas of one days trip to Snowbasin at $30.6 (170/20 = 8.5g, 8.5g x $3.6 = $30.6) and $30.6 divided by 4 is $7.65 per person per trip, and assuming I go only 20 days... frown.gif  that puts gas at ruffly $153 for me this season. so for a grand total of $453, including pass.

The Canyons on the other hand are only 128 miles round trip thus... (128/20 = 6.4g, 6.4g x $3.6 = $23.04) and 23.04 divided by 4 is $5.76 per person, and thus the grand total of gas is $115.2 plus the cost of the pass, the pass being $375, the grand total is $490.2. Thus a price difference of 37.2 dollars between the two resorts. So in my case price is not so much the difference, but the cost of time, seeing as how snowbasin will cost me an extra 1 and a half hours round trip. Alas I am leaning towards snowbasin because I only have to drive 1/4 of the time, thus allowing to do be productive, in terms of school work for 3/4 of the driving time, assuming I am productive.....

Well snowbasin seems like a better mountain for me because I like steep verticle, the lift layout of snowbasin is great, with most lifts being highspeed, less crowds, and of course, the mens downhill. Anything else I should consider about canyons?

Thanks  

 

This is a pretty typical student view of travel costs, but reality is, a car costs a lot more money to operate than just fuel.  Maintenance for tires, oil, and repairs and depreciation of the car for the mileage are REAL costs.  Insurance is a sunk cost so we can leave that out.  If it's your car, you might consider it. If it's someone else's car then go for it, cause it's a bargain. Anyway, there is a reason the government allows $.55 per mile for business miles.  That is the low end of what it actually costs, and itemized costs are usually higher.  So real costs might be closer to $93.50/ 4 = 23.38/person/trip, or $467 each for 20 trips.  If it is your car, and you only collect for gas, you are basically gifting your buddies about $300 each for your unrecovered costs since you are only charging for gas.  If you each have a car and share the driving..never mind the above, it all works out.

 

You have a fun choice to make, and most skiers would be thrilled to call either one their "home area".  The drive distance would probably put me off from Snowbasin,  The suggestion to ski some individual days there makes a lot of sense to me.


Edited by Cirquerider - 9/24/12 at 9:48pm
post #34 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasudeva View Post

 I have eliminated Sundance from the list because while it may be very close (25 min) and cheap, The lack of terrain and slow chairs will drive me crazy.

 

 

Yeah but.....close and cheap isn't too bad, either.  I think if I went to school in Provo I might go there.  Or Solitude or Brighton.  

 

OTOH I drive 1 1/2 hours each way to ski, typical PNW ski commute. It's just something I've gotten used to and I imagine you have, too.    

post #35 of 43

I'm not sure what you're school schedule is like, but I wouldn't rule out Sundance if only for the closeness and the night-skiing... You're chances to catch some last minute powder turns after class will go up exponentially.

 

Then I'd augment that by searching out deals for lift tickets elsewhere.  Don't the colleges and universities have seriously discounted tickets to Snowbird?  

post #36 of 43

I know you're on a budget, but if I were you, I would make some other sacrifices and go all in on Snowbird.

 

1) Much closer

2) totally snow sure

3) one of the best advanced skier mountains in the world (not that Snowbasin isn't great when it has snow)

 

just my .02

post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Govnor View Post

 (not that Snowbasin isn't great when it has snow)

 

 

Care to explain this? 

post #38 of 43

snowbasin's season and skiability is obviously more dictated by the snow cover than snowbirds. Is that OK?

post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Govnor View Post

snowbasin's season and skiability is obviously more dictated by the snow cover than snowbirds. Is that OK?

 

The end of season dates for snowbasin and basically all UT resorts(not named snowbird) has very little to do with having snow or not and more to do with people, they always close at their highest base for the year. Snowbird just keeps on going longer and has one of the longest spring seasons of any resort on the continent. 

 

Early season neither are anywhere as good as Alta for example. But I think snowbasin has more to offer given the groomers and more mellow terrain in middle bowl. 

post #40 of 43
Thread Starter 

 I Just bought my snowbasin pass (before I turned 19, so i would still be eligable for the major discount). The problem of going to Snowbird is that the season passes are twice as expensive (600 vs 300), and while i do get %50 off tickets to snowbird with blackout dates, It would take less then 9 days of skiing before i payed for my snowbasin pass. I do love the bird but it tends to get a bit crowded on the weekends, and I plan on skiing a lot during the holidays, so blackouts are not very handy.

 

My father does come out to saltlake from time to time for business, so i may get some time in at the bird after all. I considered getting a pass at sundance becuase of the convience and price, but the lack of verticle, acerage and slow lifts would get old fast, especially if i skied there consistantly. To me snowbasin seemed like the best mountain i could get at the best price, I am looking forward to this season, (especially the mens downhill!!!) 

 

Thanks for everyones comments, 

I cant wait for the season now!

post #41 of 43

Sounds like you got it right - get the cheapest pass on your own dime and let the old man pay for the Snowbird tix if he wants to ski with you biggrin.gif

 

Enjoy the pass! And if you're looking for locals to ride with, just holler.

post #42 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Govnor View Post

snowbasin's season and skiability is obviously more dictated by the snow cover than snowbirds. Is that OK?

Considering that it takes about twice as much snow than Snowbasin for Snowbird to have good coverage I would say just the opposite, especially early season or in a low snow year.  Considering the fact that Snowbasin has one of the most sophisticated snow making systems in the world, you are pretty much assured of some long ass runs even when the snow gods don't cooperate.  In a big snow year there's not a lot of difference between 500" & 600" is there?

 

OTOH, $600 as opposed to $300 for a great mountain that is half the distance & may be open 2 months longer would be hard to resist.

 

my $.02

th_dunno-1[1].gif

JF

 

EDIT: $300 with no blackouts?...  There goes the neighborhood wink.gif.

post #43 of 43

And then again, if you go to Snowbasin, you can ski with the Ultimate Ski Bum 4ster. yahoo.gif

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