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Oil vs. Water for Cleaning Natural Stones

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I found this and thought to share it since this has been discussed before.  It is directed towards knife sharpening but I paste it here mainly for the cleaning technigue, not the honing.

 

We recommend using a light based oil to lubricate the stones.  A light mineral or petroleum oil, should be used during the honing process. You can use water, but the honing oil should then be used to clean the stones. Honing oil does more than serve as a lubricant. Honing oil suspends the steel shavings and prevents them from clogging the pores of the whetstone. Whetstones should be cleaned after use by rubbing a liberal amount of Honing oil on the stone and wiping the excess away with a clean cloth. You may also clean the stone by placing it in a dish washer to help clean it up. Do not use a Cooking Oil, for it can clog the pores in the stone and ruin it from sharpening knives.

post #2 of 13

Doc, the fluids for diamond stones seem to be alcohol based.  Any difference?
 

post #3 of 13

Personally I would stay away from oils.. any kind of. Sure it might be good for stones, but no matter how thin layer you put on stone, sooner or later this thing will end on base of your ski. And last thing you want on base of ski, is some oil.

post #4 of 13

I have some Holmenkol oil, but I mostly just use water. I can't really tell a difference.

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 

Cirquerider: The function of the fluids for diamond stones is two-fold: 1. to whisk away metal; 2. to dissipate heat generated by friction (the excess heat contributes to the early demise of the stone).  The reason for using 50/50 alcohol/water is that it dries faster.

 

Regarding the original post...  As I stated the point was not to use oil in the honing of edges, to clarify it was that I have been asked by customers how to clean a stone that was gummed up with grime to try to restore it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post

Doc, the fluids for diamond stones seem to be alcohol based.  Any difference?
 

post #6 of 13

Does it really matter if it's clean or not?  Mine is all black, but still seems to work.  

post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Does it really matter if it's clean or not?  Mine is all black, but still seems to work.  

 

Wouldn't anything in the pores change the grit?  Make it smoother.  If nothing else, not consistant. 

 

 

That brings us to "What is good enough and what am I doing just because it makes me feel better?"

post #8 of 13

Well, the Arkansas stone is extremely smooth and is my last polish anyway, so not sure that loss of grit is a concern at that point so much.  

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

 

Wouldn't anything in the pores change the grit?  Make it smoother.  If nothing else, not consistant. 

 

You're assuming that it stays in the pores, instead of being lifted out through buoyancy and capillary action mechanisms to create a cutting slurry.       

 

With a slurry, proving 'not consistent'  would require showing that more particle matter is lost to gravity drip or being flung off than is created during the same time by abrasive action -

 

and if you show that, then the cutting action has the wonderfully desirable quality of being self-stopping when a specific degree of smoothing has been reached.

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Well, the Arkansas stone is extremely smooth and is my last polish anyway, so not sure that loss of grit is a concern at that point so much.  

 

For some reason I thought your were talking about diamond stone and not Arkansas.  Not sure if it changes the accuracy of my answer based on what cantunamunch wrote.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Well, the Arkansas stone is extremely smooth and is my last polish anyway, so not sure that loss of grit is a concern at that point so much.  

 

For some reason I thought your were talking about diamond stone and not Arkansas.  Not sure if it changes the accuracy of my answer based on what cantunamunch wrote.

The topic is about cleaning natural stones.

post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

The topic is about cleaning natural stones.

 

Yup.  However, in post 5, diamond stones was mentioned.  I thought (for some unknown reason other than being a wackadoodle) that you were still talking about them and not back on topic.

post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 

On a surface level a diamond stone is a flat plain studded with sharp rocky spires. Conversely a natural stone is a flat surface erratically scored by canyons & pores.  If the pores are how the stone performs its function, then clogging the pores decreases its effectiveness.


Edited by Doctor D - 9/13/12 at 7:51pm
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