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Feet different - Is it OK to have 1.5mm difference in height?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

After a year on what it seems were 1 size too large, I am now dialing in new Quest 10's. I am using a shaped footbed is good, giving nice support under instep, and then there is a thin flat spacer under that.

 

The first choice of spacers (white) were too thick, creating pain in both feet

 

The new spacers (1 size thinner) are good on the LH but the RH is still in crush mode. RH foot looks slightly slightly shorter and wider than LH.

 

Do you think it's OK to remove the spacer under RH only? It's 1.5mm I think. (blue)

 

The local boot fitter who sold me these new boots is really helpful but I like to understand these things also...

 

Cheers

 

B

post #2 of 9

1.5mm isn't a lot but it is enough to change your balance (assuming you have some feeling as to what is happening, many don't), what you could try is getting a piece of material of the same thickness and keeping it just under the heel so that the heel height is the same but there is more volume available over the rest of the foot, alternatively the fitter could stretch the boot over the tight spots

 

call me old fashioned but i always question the use of volume reducer shims in new ski boots unless every other shell option has be exhausted and there is nothing that fits better, there are times when they are required but i all too often see fitters reaching for them as a band aid for a shell with too much volume

post #3 of 9

Baldrick,

 

Your bootfitter  might be able to remove some of the padding in the tongue over your (RH) instep to free up some space and leave the spacer in---also be sure not to tighten the instep or toe buckles as this will only cause problems----do tighten the ankle buckle as tightly as you can comfortably stand to hold your heels back in the shell.

 

One more item to think about---if the boot is too long/big for your feet and you have to use shims, it is possible your feet are pulled into the back of the boot with the center of your foot behind the center of the boot/ski.  This will cause you to ski the back of the ski all the time and 

fight to balance, no funfrown.gif.

 

mike


Edited by miketsc - 9/7/12 at 7:21am
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys. I took one out at home and didn't like the feel, so have left both in and lets see how it goes next  time on snow. I know its easy enough to take both or one spacer out when on the slopes, and I am hoping the liners are packing out a bit more each time I use them

 

CEM I feel (and hope) the volume is pretty close and yes we still have the option of a little stretch behind the RH little toe.

 

Mike, these boots are one full size smaller than I had. Shell check gives 24mm gap behind the heel in bare feet.

 

When I first get into the boots they feel too short. Then I do up the ankle buckle and flex forward to push the heel back, then tighten up the ankle buckle. I have been leaving the toe buckle and the instep buckle totally loose at this stage (three buckle boot + strap) Overall they feel quite snug once I have done that, but dont know the best way to determine how much heel lift (if any) there is, and whether it is permissible or desireable...maybe that excercise can only be done on snow? When I last skied in them, after taking the spacer out, they did not feel overly tight around the heel, but neither did I feel actual heel lift. No sore spots or blisters after 3 hours like that, whereas with the old boots I used to get a developing blister on the inside ankle (from heel movement I suppose)

 

Will follow up after next day out

 

Cheers

post #5 of 9

Baldrick,

 

So far as shell check goes, 24mm is almost a full centimeter to large---you would probably fit well into the next size down on your nest boot purchase,

 

these puppies will pack out in about 20 or 30 days of skiing if not sooner.

 

Any heel lift is too much!

 

3 buckle boots won't / don't hold the heel as well as a 4 buckle will.

 

mike

post #6 of 9

agree with Mike 1 inch is too big, also if all I needed was a mm or so over the instep I wouldn't remove any under foot spacers and make the entire foot looser I'd simply grind the tongue over the instep area.  but I think your boots are too big.

 

Lou

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

Update. I have had several days on these boots and the last 2 have been using an increased arch/inside  support under the footbed right up against the inside wall of the boot and extending from heel to just forward of the arch (maybe not quite forward enough - Under ball of foot feels as though it's losing contact) This done by the same bootfitter. It has had interesting results, as follows.

 

The first day was at Mt Hutt so chairlifts all day. I skied all day in whiteout and semi clear varying conditions. Snow was shallow heavy powder and the undersurface quite variable. By unbuckling on the chair sometimes I managed to keep the boots on as they were. Boots held my feet very well, giving lots of confidence and more precision than I have been used to. A good day of about 28000 vertical feet and did not notice pain or excessive tiredness in the feet. No edging or crossing problems noticed due to change in footbed angle (invert/evert?)

 

The second day after 1 day back at work was up to Broken River. There is quite a bit of walking and steps even with the "inclinator" in service, and it was warm, so I was getting hot feet even before the first turn. Boots had been OK in walk mode but were killing me as soon as we started skiing, and I needed to take out the blue liner under the footbed. From this point I could cope but my feet were not at all happy. We still had a great day though and skied out through Allans basin right down (almost) to the carpark.

 

I was surprised at the difference in foot happiness. But of course they don't get a rest with rope tows.

 

Buckles - toe and instep - not tightened at all. Bottom ankle buckle - still done up moderate.No upper ankle but huge power strap

 

Any comments or observations welcome but my main concern - is there a way I can determine if the arch support is being overdone? I feel like I may now have minor bruising under the arch (the bit nearest the heel).

 

Note: Rear spoilers are both out to save the left leg from my old friend the lower calf pain.

 

On the plus side I have greater awareness of my edges and feel pretty sure that these boots have helped considerably.

 

Thanks

post #8 of 9

If I understand properly the pad is between the medial aspect of the shell and your foot, which would tighten and support your foot but also limit range of motion.  I imagine the extra control you are feeling is because you have snugged up the fit but improperly.  The best way to compensate for a boot that is to big is to change its purpose.  I tow a camping trailer from time to time and we lost the tire chocks.  I found a ski boot parallel the direction of travel and toe against the tire works beautifully.

 

Lou

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou Rosenfeld View Post

If I understand properly the pad is between the medial aspect of the shell and your foot, which would tighten and support your foot but also limit range of motion.  I imagine the extra control you are feeling is because you have snugged up the fit but improperly.  The best way to compensate for a boot that is to big is to change its purpose.  I tow a camping trailer from time to time and we lost the tire chocks.  I found a ski boot parallel the direction of travel and toe against the tire works beautifully.

 

Lou

And I thought I had accurate technical writing sussed - Darn! The pad was under my foot not beside it, but less then half a foot wide on a line of the big toe/next toe, not right across the whole width. Theory was to assist the arch not to collapse, which he (the boot guy) thought was happening somewhat. He thought the collapse could be pushing the little toe side across and causing the pain. Anyway between us we decided there was too much point pressure and refined it with less bulk under the arch and thin pads under ball of foot and heel. It feels good now, and flexing weight down puts my knees naturally over my feet. I don't have side to side movement so wouldn't need any sideways padding.

 

Do boots have an afterlife career as chocks? Well, these are dark bronze colour boat tyres are silver. Just won't fly.

 

I Don't think there will be any more updates - we have run out of ski season. Enjoy yours.

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