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Living Nowhere Near the Mountains-How Do You Do It? - Page 3

post #61 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

Oh geez, as Shredhead pointed out, those weren't locals, those were lifties who had probably lived in Breck for 7 months. 


There are short term locals and there are long term locals.  If they were at the resort several days a week for the entire season that makes them "locals" in most people's book.   I'd also consider the ""students"" at CMC "locals", even the freshmen at the end of the first season there.  Natives?  no., but locals, yes..

post #62 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

Yes, I've seen it quite a bit.  You ever try to be first on the High T or Cirque traverse on a big day?

 

Oh, Alta - I don't believe they're any nicer to 'locals' on those days.  It's pretty much equal opportunity abuse, no one gets any slack.  

 

Got any other examples?  The thing is, tourists seem to think they're getting abuse for being tourists, when really it's that they're being clueless, not where they're from.  

post #63 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

Oh, Alta - I don't believe they're any nicer to 'locals' on those days.  It's pretty much equal opportunity abuse, no one gets any slack.  

 

Regardless of who you are, LCC is an absolute madhouse on a pow day…

 

That long bearded telemarker doesn’t care if you’re a gaper, SLC resident, tourist, whatever. You cut his line and he’ll take your head off!

post #64 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post
 The thing is, tourists seem to think they're getting abuse for being tourists, when really it's that they're being clueless, not where they're from.  

+++1.

 

I've skied with Bears and been totally happy, but friends who have come in from out of town and just AREN'T REALLY SKIERS, now that's another issue.  Couldn't wait for the last ones to leave.

post #65 of 77

Here's a good one..  Experienced skiers will either get out of the lift line or wait at the top for folks they know and see getting to the corral late, way behind them in line.  Tourists will call the rest of their party to come up and cut the line ahead of everyone behind them..hopmad.gif

post #66 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

 

Oh, Alta - I don't believe they're any nicer to 'locals' on those days.  It's pretty much equal opportunity abuse, no one gets any slack.  

 

Got any other examples?  The thing is, tourists seem to think they're getting abuse for being tourists, when really it's that they're being clueless, not where they're from.  


Read Carrflor's review of Valle Nevada for a classic example of that.

post #67 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Here's a good one..  Experienced skiers will either get out of the lift line or wait at the top for folks they know and see getting to the corral late, way behind them in line.  Tourists will call the rest of their party to come up and cut the line ahead of everyone behind them..hopmad.gif

 

This is seriously one of my biggest pet peeves, but it certainly isn't a local vs tourist thing. It's just an asshole (or totally oblivious) thing.

post #68 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by iWill View Post

Read Carrflor's review of Valle Nevada for a classic example of that.

That was pretty hilarious. That guy got a full-on "tourist" treatment over on TGR. Most of the responses here on Epic were pretty epic too.
post #69 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

Yes, I've seen it quite a bit.  You ever try to be first on the High T or Cirque traverse on a big day?

Excellent example, and in fact some of the worst offenders, while they have in some cases been long-term locals, have not been tied economically to the resort in a direct way -- so were goring someone else's ox when they act a bit over the top -- and for sure would and do cut perceived members of their own circle slack they wouldn't cut to others, ranging from on traverses, to breaches in safety etiquette and the like.  And, as also seems to be a rule when it comes to localism,  often not standouts when it came it their actual skiing.  Good news is, resorts aren't into scaring their non-local customers away, so do try to keep a reasonable clamp on this. 

post #70 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

Yes, I've seen it quite a bit.  You ever try to be first on the High T or Cirque traverse on a big day?

 

I understand the situation but that has nothing to do with being a tourist. Its more about being in the way. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

 

Oh, Alta - I don't believe they're any nicer to 'locals' on those days.  It's pretty much equal opportunity abuse, no one gets any slack.  

 

Got any other examples?  The thing is, tourists seem to think they're getting abuse for being tourists, when really it's that they're being clueless, not where they're from.  

 

Yep. 

post #71 of 77

Funny thread drift. To OP: There's an implication of purer-than-thou in your opener. You gave it all up for the mountains and clean air, how do those of us who didn't manage to survive with ourselves and still be so happy? You may or may not mean that, but...

 

Anyway, at the risk of being chased off by an angry mob wielding torches, it's an easy choice. Skiing is astonishingly cool elite play, to be able to do whenever and wherever I can. We're all fortunate to able to do it. It's not life. And the vast majority of all the people on earth either don't even know what it is, or if they do, don't give a sh*t. Good for them. 

 

As far as tourists vs. locals, unclear where season pass holders who don't live near the slopes fit into all this. All I know is when "locals" get too full of themselves and their localness, it's kinda sad/irritating, like watching a school board member in a tiny district go all important. And when outsiders try to act local, it's sadder still, in a different, painful way. Get into your own life, don't imitate someone else's. And when tourists get into their "my money keeps this place going" act, I just want to show them where they can put their ski poles. Finally, anyone who cuts in line, local or outsider, should be gutted on the spot by a specially trained employee, probably from Chile, with a Katana. In other words, most everyone's messed up, each in our own way.

 

Hope that clarifies things...wink.gif

post #72 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

... All I know is when "locals" get too full of themselves and their localness... In other words, most everyone's messed up, each in our own way.

 

At some of the resorts mentioned re traverses, locals have in fact suggested to some of the people trying to give a localism vibe that it ain't cool.

 

Localism always sounds bad, but close to it are mutual respect, judgment, and conserving resources, which of course can be good.  Hard to teach judgment.  For sure all user groups have their odd jerks and issues, and also their big positives. 

post #73 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Funny thread drift. To OP: There's an implication of purer-than-thou in your opener. You gave it all up for the mountains and clean air, how do those of us who didn't manage to survive with ourselves and still be so happy? You may or may not mean that, but...

Hope that clarifies things...wink.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post

 

Not sure if you're laughing with us or at us OP ?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by COBillsFan View Post

Neither of these Wolf.

 

I respect anyone who's a self confessed ski addict based out of a distant location and still puts in plenty of days on the slopes. I've learned plenty about appreciating the time spent in the mountains from these folks.

 

At the same time, I'm simply curious how someone so dedicated can keep it together when they're based out of West Palm Beach, San Antonio, Nashville or Indianapolis, because as I originally mentioned, many of us dropped everything and sprinted for the mountains once we got our first taste.

 

I'm glad some one else picked up on this, I thought I was going crazy. I think the OP cleared up the ambiguity.

post #74 of 77
Quote:
The Mid-Atlantic folks certainly are a different breed than the deep south and Florida skiers since you actually have ski areas, as well as the Appalachians, but there’s only so much you can get at these places. Less than 1000’ of vert, maybe 100” of snowfall, 150 acres of skiing, it’s better than no skiing, but once you get the feeling of the big mountains in New England, and then the West, it’s hard for many to go back to these spots and be content with it.

 

It's not quite that bleak for us Mid Atlantic folks. True we only have 1000' of vert (1500' for two Snowshoe, WV trails) but West Virginia snowfall is more like 150" to 200" (or greater, even winters other than 2010.) In winters other than last winter, some legitimate tree skiing to be found. With that tree skiing, comes plenty of challenges: tight cruxes, stream beds, brush whacking, log jumping, etc. And often blower snow. 1000' of vert goes a lot farther if you spend most of it in the trees.

 

I typically get 10-15 days skiing out West each winter, so I'm no stranger. But I find the vert and acreage stats a bit misleading, though the views are a different story. At most areas I ski (especially Utah), I generally only ski a small subset of the mountain (have my favorite stashes.) I'm plenty happy doing laps on Alta's Supreme Lift (only 1100'). (Cue Bird vs Alta fight.)

post #75 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by COBillsFan View Post

You are right BW, I totally forgot about AZ Snowball. 

 

Arizona also has plenty of big mountains to keep you occupied. It's more high desert terrain, but it's still a beautiful area.

 

Now if you're in Mississippi or Florida, you're screwed....cool.gif


AZ is decent.  Sunrise had 216 inches last year spaced out in nice weekly storms and is close enough for a day trip from Phx if you are dedicated.  I leave at 5 AM and get back into town around 8 or 9 at night.  Snowbowl in Flagstaff is starting up a new snow making system that will make the place far better this season. The 2 hr drive there is nothing.  You also can't forget Mt. Lemmon above Tucson with their little lift and the most southern skiing in the US.  They had a 40 inch base at Christmas last year.  It is definitely harder here to get the pow but we can get plenty of turns.

post #76 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnL View Post

tight cruxes, stream beds, brush whacking, log jumping, etc. And often blower snow. 1000' of vert goes a lot farther if you spend most of it in the trees

Hooray for bushwacking, log jumping, and stream beds in the woods. Too bad the poison ivy dies down, because you could add that as an obstacle, too.
post #77 of 77

The availability, cost, and desirability of moving to support a ski habit was/is different for different eras and different times of life:

 

- If a midwesterner learned to ski as a kid in the 1960's, graduating and picking up to go to ski country was a much different socioeconomic decision back then than if you were a kid graduating in the 1990's or today.

 

- If you learned to ski after you were married and had kids and a career in the midwest, moving family and career to ski country was generally a big (and not always possible) decision.

 

- Married midwest skiers who have young grandchildren know they will rarely be able to convince their wife to move to a city different than where the grandchildren currently are.

 

- Any married couple where only one partner skis (or where both used to ski, but for various reasons one does not ski now), creates barriers to moving to the slopes. 

 

I'm sure many of you can come up with more examples along this line of thinking.  I learned to ski when I was in my 30's in Pennsylvania in the 1970's and went wild with skiing at Seven Springs locally and at Eastern and Western ski resorts for vacations.  In the 1990's my career brought me and wife and kids to Louisville, Kentucky.  Now, between vacations to (primarily) Western slopes, I frequent two local southern Indiana ski hills for our two-month January and February man-made snow "winter", taking up NASTAR racing in order to keep skiing a groomed 300' vertical hill interesting.  That and subscriptions to most major ski magazines and boards like this one help tide me over.   

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